What is PF Usage?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Rfdjr1@optonline.net, Mar 3, 2004.

  1. Guest

    What is PF Usage that I see in the Performance tab of Task Manager? I
    tried a Googles search but other than a lot of people discussing what
    their PF Usage is, I can't find a definition. Mine is running about
    173Mb right now. Thanks.
     
    , Mar 3, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. wrote:

    > What is PF Usage that I see in the Performance tab of Task Manager? I
    > tried a Googles search but other than a lot of people discussing what
    > their PF Usage is, I can't find a definition. Mine is running about
    > 173Mb right now. Thanks.
    >

    Pf= Pagefile. A file on your harddrive used as an extension of your RAM.
    Since a disk is a lot slower than RAM you want to avoid making a lot of
    use of your pagefile.


    --
    Groeten/Regards
    Jeroen Wijnands
    jeroen at wijnands punt xs4all punt nl
     
    Jeroen Wijnands, Mar 3, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Harrison Guest

    On Wed, 03 Mar 2004 09:22:43 -0500, wrote:

    >What is PF Usage that I see in the Performance tab of Task Manager? I
    >tried a Googles search but other than a lot of people discussing what
    >their PF Usage is, I can't find a definition. Mine is running about
    >173Mb right now. Thanks.


    PF refers to the Windows swap file, also known as the paging file.
    This is a file space on your hard drive which is allocated to be used as virtual memory by the operating system.
    Virtual memory functions as RAM, but uses hard drive space instead of standard RAM. Virtual memory is markedly slower
    than RAM.
    Depending on how much physical RAM you have, you may want to try running Windows without a paging file altogether. Not
    recommended for less than 1024 MB of memory, however.

    Ideally, you would want the paging file on its own separate partition, placed at the beginning of the drive. This
    improves seek times and guards against fragmentation. If you have two or more hard drives, place the paging file on a
    separate partition, at the beginning of the drive, and on the non-system physical drive. This will greatly improve
    performance as the system can utilize both drives at the same time for different functions.
     
    Harrison, Mar 3, 2004
    #3
  4. Guest

    Thanks. I have 1Gb of RAM. Where would I disable page filing in
    Windows XP if I wanted to try that?? I have a 120Gb hard drive in two
    equal partitions. Is this a folder I should look for and maybe move to
    the partition that doesn't have the operating system on it? Or does
    that only help if I have as you mentioned, two physical drives?

    >On Wed, 03 Mar 2004 09:22:43 -0500, wrote:
    >
    >>What is PF Usage that I see in the Performance tab of Task Manager? I
    >>tried a Googles search but other than a lot of people discussing what
    >>their PF Usage is, I can't find a definition. Mine is running about
    >>173Mb right now. Thanks.

    >
    >PF refers to the Windows swap file, also known as the paging file.
    >This is a file space on your hard drive which is allocated to be used as virtual memory by the operating system.
    >Virtual memory functions as RAM, but uses hard drive space instead of standard RAM. Virtual memory is markedly slower
    >than RAM.
    >Depending on how much physical RAM you have, you may want to try running Windows without a paging file altogether. Not
    >recommended for less than 1024 MB of memory, however.
    >
    >Ideally, you would want the paging file on its own separate partition, placed at the beginning of the drive. This
    >improves seek times and guards against fragmentation. If you have two or more hard drives, place the paging file on a
    >separate partition, at the beginning of the drive, and on the non-system physical drive. This will greatly improve
    >performance as the system can utilize both drives at the same time for different functions.
     
    , Mar 4, 2004
    #4
  5. br1ght Guest

    To disable the prefetcher:

    Start > run >regedit
    Go to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE \ SYSTEM \ CurrentControlSet \
    Control \ SessionManager \ Memory Management \
    PrefetchParameters
    Double-click the EnablePrefetcher value (remember the value
    that EnablePrefetcher is set to!)
    Change the Value data to 0 to disable the prefetcher, 1 to
    prefetch applications only, 2 prefetch boot only, 3 is
    default and does both
    Close the registry editor and reboot the computer for the
    changes to take effect


    bright

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++



    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    | Thanks. I have 1Gb of RAM. Where would I disable page
    filing in
    | Windows XP if I wanted to try that?? I have a 120Gb hard
    drive in two
    | equal partitions. Is this a folder I should look for and
    maybe move to
    | the partition that doesn't have the operating system on
    it? Or does
    | that only help if I have as you mentioned, two physical
    drives?
    |
    | >On Wed, 03 Mar 2004 09:22:43 -0500,
    wrote:
    | >
    | >>What is PF Usage that I see in the Performance tab of
    Task Manager? I
    | >>tried a Googles search but other than a lot of people
    discussing what
    | >>their PF Usage is, I can't find a definition. Mine is
    running about
    | >>173Mb right now. Thanks.
    | >
    | >PF refers to the Windows swap file, also known as the
    paging file.
    | >This is a file space on your hard drive which is
    allocated to be used as virtual memory by the operating
    system.
    | >Virtual memory functions as RAM, but uses hard drive
    space instead of standard RAM. Virtual memory is markedly
    slower
    | >than RAM.
    | >Depending on how much physical RAM you have, you may want
    to try running Windows without a paging file altogether. Not
    | >recommended for less than 1024 MB of memory, however.
    | >
    | >Ideally, you would want the paging file on its own
    separate partition, placed at the beginning of the drive.
    This
    | >improves seek times and guards against fragmentation. If
    you have two or more hard drives, place the paging file on a
    | >separate partition, at the beginning of the drive, and on
    the non-system physical drive. This will greatly improve
    | >performance as the system can utilize both drives at the
    same time for different functions.
    |
    |
     
    br1ght, Mar 4, 2004
    #5
  6. Harrison Guest

    On Wed, 03 Mar 2004 19:53:02 -0500, wrote:

    >Thanks. I have 1Gb of RAM. Where would I disable page filing in
    >Windows XP if I wanted to try that?? I have a 120Gb hard drive in two
    >equal partitions. Is this a folder I should look for and maybe move to
    >the partition that doesn't have the operating system on it? Or does
    >that only help if I have as you mentioned, two physical drives?


    Right-click My Computer and choose Properties.
    Click Advanced
    Under Performance, click Settings
    Click Advanced
    Under Virtual Memory, click Change

    Moving the swap file to a second partition on the same physical drive will be of no benefit, and would actually result
    in a degradation of performance due to the seek times being slightly longer towards the middle of the disk.

    If you ever reinstall from scratch, create a 1.5GB partition as the first partition on the drive and place the swap
    file, and nothing else, there. Use the balance of the disk as you see fit for Windows and files.

    >
    >>On Wed, 03 Mar 2004 09:22:43 -0500, wrote:
    >>
    >>>What is PF Usage that I see in the Performance tab of Task Manager? I
    >>>tried a Googles search but other than a lot of people discussing what
    >>>their PF Usage is, I can't find a definition. Mine is running about
    >>>173Mb right now. Thanks.

    >>
    >>PF refers to the Windows swap file, also known as the paging file.
    >>This is a file space on your hard drive which is allocated to be used as virtual memory by the operating system.
    >>Virtual memory functions as RAM, but uses hard drive space instead of standard RAM. Virtual memory is markedly slower
    >>than RAM.
    >>Depending on how much physical RAM you have, you may want to try running Windows without a paging file altogether. Not
    >>recommended for less than 1024 MB of memory, however.
    >>
    >>Ideally, you would want the paging file on its own separate partition, placed at the beginning of the drive. This
    >>improves seek times and guards against fragmentation. If you have two or more hard drives, place the paging file on a
    >>separate partition, at the beginning of the drive, and on the non-system physical drive. This will greatly improve
    >>performance as the system can utilize both drives at the same time for different functions.

    >
     
    Harrison, Mar 4, 2004
    #6
  7. Harrison Guest

    Wonderful bit of information. Irrelevant to the OP's question, but nonetheless wonderful.

    On Wed, 3 Mar 2004 19:52:29 -0600, "br1ght" <nitrox_frogy@> wrote:

    >To disable the prefetcher:
    >
    >Start > run >regedit
    >Go to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE \ SYSTEM \ CurrentControlSet \
    >Control \ SessionManager \ Memory Management \
    >PrefetchParameters
    >Double-click the EnablePrefetcher value (remember the value
    >that EnablePrefetcher is set to!)
    >Change the Value data to 0 to disable the prefetcher, 1 to
    >prefetch applications only, 2 prefetch boot only, 3 is
    >default and does both
    >Close the registry editor and reboot the computer for the
    >changes to take effect
    >
    >
    >bright
    >
    >+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    >
    >
    >
    ><> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >| Thanks. I have 1Gb of RAM. Where would I disable page
    >filing in
    >| Windows XP if I wanted to try that?? I have a 120Gb hard
    >drive in two
    >| equal partitions. Is this a folder I should look for and
    >maybe move to
    >| the partition that doesn't have the operating system on
    >it? Or does
    >| that only help if I have as you mentioned, two physical
    >drives?
    >|
    >| >On Wed, 03 Mar 2004 09:22:43 -0500,
    >wrote:
    >| >
    >| >>What is PF Usage that I see in the Performance tab of
    >Task Manager? I
    >| >>tried a Googles search but other than a lot of people
    >discussing what
    >| >>their PF Usage is, I can't find a definition. Mine is
    >running about
    >| >>173Mb right now. Thanks.
    >| >
    >| >PF refers to the Windows swap file, also known as the
    >paging file.
    >| >This is a file space on your hard drive which is
    >allocated to be used as virtual memory by the operating
    >system.
    >| >Virtual memory functions as RAM, but uses hard drive
    >space instead of standard RAM. Virtual memory is markedly
    >slower
    >| >than RAM.
    >| >Depending on how much physical RAM you have, you may want
    >to try running Windows without a paging file altogether. Not
    >| >recommended for less than 1024 MB of memory, however.
    >| >
    >| >Ideally, you would want the paging file on its own
    >separate partition, placed at the beginning of the drive.
    >This
    >| >improves seek times and guards against fragmentation. If
    >you have two or more hard drives, place the paging file on a
    >| >separate partition, at the beginning of the drive, and on
    >the non-system physical drive. This will greatly improve
    >| >performance as the system can utilize both drives at the
    >same time for different functions.
    >|
    >|
    >
     
    Harrison, Mar 4, 2004
    #7
  8. DynV

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2007
    Messages:
    1
    I wonder why you discussed about prefetching as it was negative, after seeing this article about prefetcher on wikipedia : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prefetcher

    I see that I need to enable Task Scheaduler as stated in the article !
     
    DynV, Sep 20, 2007
    #8
  9. elextro

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2009
    Messages:
    1
    Hey . I have 582 MB of PF Usage right now but I don't understand why. You see, my Task Manager also says that I have 3144988 K of Total Physical Memory and 2414728 K of available physical memory. My System Cache is 1009632 K.
    If I have 2414728 K of Physical Memory available then why I'm I using 582MB of virtual memory?
     
    elextro, Nov 3, 2009
    #9
  10. phoenixtwo87

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2011
    Messages:
    1
    PF Usage = Physical Memory + Page File

    Hey guys,

    Phoenix here, I scrolled through this section kinda fast but I don't think I saw this mentioned above. If it was I apologize you may chastise me later. lol.

    PF usage actually refers to the total memory being used in your system. This is total physical RAM + Page File Size. The top of the PF usage graph being the maximum memory your system can handle. Start approaching that section of the graph and you start getting those worrisome low memory warnings that I'm sure many of you have seen once or twice in your life. Adding more RAM to the system will increase the value that that graph displays as will increasing the size of your page file.

    If you'll take a walk with me down to the commit charge location, the values in this section are actually what is represented by the PF usage graph. Total = the bright green value at the bottom of the graph (only here its displayed in KB not MB/GB). Limit = the value represented by the top of the graph (No value is actually shown at the top of the graph). And of course peak = Highest value that the TOTAL has reached.

    What you want to see in that section is a value that is less than your total physical RAM if you have 512MB installed in your system total and you are seeing over 800MB being used then you know that approximately 300 MB are being ran out of the page file itself. Chances are that your system is running rather s-l-o-w as well.

    If you are seeing system slow downs and you hear a lot of disk activity then you should check this portion of task manager. If the PF usage is much higher than total physical RAM in the machine you should add more RAM. I would just bump your RAM up to 2GB it's typically a cheap upgrade that can boost performance by a lot. If you already have a good deal of RAM in the system and are still over that value, then you should really look at what is running on the machine. Uninstall unnecessary programs and run malware scans. It may be wise to boot to SAFE mode and run the malware scans. IF you don't see an improvement seek help. Also if the system is sluggish only when Internet Explorer is open make sure you don't have a ton of toolbars up in the top. I can't tell you how many times I have logged into machines where the internet browser is open and half the screen is filled with toolbars and the other half is a tiny sliver of webpage. If you have a ton of toolbars get rid of them.

    Hopefully this is helpful!
     
    phoenixtwo87, Oct 27, 2011
    #10
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. =?Utf-8?B?anNhbmNoZXo=?=

    Block usage of neighbors network.

    =?Utf-8?B?anNhbmNoZXo=?=, Jan 26, 2005, in forum: Wireless Networking
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    2,796
    Mark Gamache
    Jan 27, 2005
  2. Jan
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    791
    =?Utf-8?B?UGF2ZWwgQS4=?=
    Feb 22, 2005
  3. =?Utf-8?B?QW5keVM=?=

    Concurrent ICS + wireless print server usage

    =?Utf-8?B?QW5keVM=?=, Apr 20, 2005, in forum: Wireless Networking
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    587
    DLink Guru
    Apr 21, 2005
  4. Tom Del Rosso

    Firefox CPU usage

    Tom Del Rosso, Nov 1, 2005, in forum: Firefox
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    4,754
    Ed Mullen
    Nov 2, 2005
  5. Linz

    Usage Meter

    Linz, Nov 30, 2005, in forum: Wireless Networking
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    776
    Jack \(MVP-Networking\).
    Dec 1, 2005
Loading...

Share This Page