what do i need to write DVDs?

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Marcellus Wallace, Nov 4, 2003.

  1. Ok, so I'm looking for advice on what sort of computer equipment I need for
    the project I'm taking on. I work at a talent agency and we want to be able
    to put together our actors' demo reels on DVD. Up to now, we have been using
    video tape. For a bunch of different reasons that are pretty obvious, it
    would be better to have them on DVD. Generally, the reels will only be 10-15
    minutes in length. We need the DVDs we make to be playable on standard DVD
    players, not just DVD-ROMs or whatever. We also need to be able to extract
    scenes from other DVDs and then save them permanently to the hard drive so
    that whenever we need to cut a new reel, we can do it relatively easily.

    So given what we want to do, what kind equipment and software do we need?
    I'm thinking we may just buy a new computer specifically for this task. I've
    been given a budget of $4K or so, but I was hoping to do it for far less.
    Any recommendations would be much appreciated.
     
    Marcellus Wallace, Nov 4, 2003
    #1
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  2. Marcellus Wallace

    Klaus Guest

    1) A DV camcorder
    2) Computer with large hard drive and firewire input.
    3) DVD recorder (burner)
    4) Blank media
    5) Software for editing (most DVD burners will come with this)
    6) Time


    "Marcellus Wallace" <> wrote in message
    news:ULTpb.9248$...
    > Ok, so I'm looking for advice on what sort of computer equipment I need

    for
    > the project I'm taking on. I work at a talent agency and we want to be

    able
    > to put together our actors' demo reels on DVD. Up to now, we have been

    using
    > video tape. For a bunch of different reasons that are pretty obvious, it
    > would be better to have them on DVD. Generally, the reels will only be

    10-15
    > minutes in length. We need the DVDs we make to be playable on standard DVD
    > players, not just DVD-ROMs or whatever. We also need to be able to extract
    > scenes from other DVDs and then save them permanently to the hard drive so
    > that whenever we need to cut a new reel, we can do it relatively easily.
    >
    > So given what we want to do, what kind equipment and software do we need?
    > I'm thinking we may just buy a new computer specifically for this task.

    I've
    > been given a budget of $4K or so, but I was hoping to do it for far less.
    > Any recommendations would be much appreciated.
    >
    >





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    Klaus, Nov 4, 2003
    #2
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  3. in article ULTpb.9248$, Marcellus
    Wallace at wrote on 11/4/03 12:13 PM:

    > Ok, so I'm looking for advice on what sort of computer equipment I need for
    > the project I'm taking on. I work at a talent agency and we want to be able
    > to put together our actors' demo reels on DVD. Up to now, we have been using
    > video tape. For a bunch of different reasons that are pretty obvious, it
    > would be better to have them on DVD. Generally, the reels will only be 10-15
    > minutes in length. We need the DVDs we make to be playable on standard DVD
    > players, not just DVD-ROMs or whatever. We also need to be able to extract
    > scenes from other DVDs and then save them permanently to the hard drive so
    > that whenever we need to cut a new reel, we can do it relatively easily.
    >
    > So given what we want to do, what kind equipment and software do we need?
    > I'm thinking we may just buy a new computer specifically for this task. I've
    > been given a budget of $4K or so, but I was hoping to do it for far less.
    > Any recommendations would be much appreciated.


    I highly recommend getting a Mac. Get one with a Superdrive, and it will
    come with iMovie, iDVD, FireWire, all in a system that is very easy to use,
    learn, and deal with in general.

    There's shareware for extracting scenes from other DVDs, but it may not be
    needed if what you're really talking about is saving your own scenes in a
    way that they can always be accessed.

    For compatibility, you'll want to use DVD-R, but keep in mind there are some
    older players that aren't compatible with any recordable DVD format.

    Which specific Mac you should get depends on the volume of work you'll be
    doing. You might also find that you want more robust software such as Final
    Cut Express or Final Cut Pro for editing video, and DVD Studio Pro for
    authoring DVDs, and maybe also Toast. It all depends on how much you're
    intending to do.

    If you want more advice, need a consultant or are hiring, let me know:


    Remove AFRAIDOFSPAM to respond.
     
    Kevin Edwards, Nov 4, 2003
    #3
  4. Marcellus Wallace

    luminos Guest

    A PC ca. 1 ghz.
    Windows 2000 or XP
    Pinnacle PCI analog to video direct MPEG or Canopus (do not go AVI and
    convert...the time is not worth it for videotape). Get a
    hardware MPEG2 encoder.
    DVD Burner-Pioneer A04
    DVD Author or DVDXMAKER software.

    well under $2K.

    see www.videoguys.com for such.

    '
    "Marcellus Wallace" <> wrote in message
    news:ULTpb.9248$...
    > Ok, so I'm looking for advice on what sort of computer equipment I need

    for
    > the project I'm taking on. I work at a talent agency and we want to be

    able
    > to put together our actors' demo reels on DVD. Up to now, we have been

    using
    > video tape. For a bunch of different reasons that are pretty obvious, it
    > would be better to have them on DVD. Generally, the reels will only be

    10-15
    > minutes in length. We need the DVDs we make to be playable on standard DVD
    > players, not just DVD-ROMs or whatever. We also need to be able to extract
    > scenes from other DVDs and then save them permanently to the hard drive so
    > that whenever we need to cut a new reel, we can do it relatively easily.
    >
    > So given what we want to do, what kind equipment and software do we need?
    > I'm thinking we may just buy a new computer specifically for this task.

    I've
    > been given a budget of $4K or so, but I was hoping to do it for far less.
    > Any recommendations would be much appreciated.
    >
    >
     
    luminos, Nov 4, 2003
    #4
  5. Marcellus Wallace

    luminos Guest

    Ooops...Any Pioneer ca. A06.

    "luminos" <> wrote in message
    news:TNVpb.4300502$...
    > A PC ca. 1 ghz.
    > Windows 2000 or XP
    > Pinnacle PCI analog to video direct MPEG or Canopus (do not go AVI and
    > convert...the time is not worth it for videotape). Get a
    > hardware MPEG2 encoder.
    > DVD Burner-Pioneer A04
    > DVD Author or DVDXMAKER software.
    >
    > well under $2K.
    >
    > see www.videoguys.com for such.
    >
    > '
    > "Marcellus Wallace" <> wrote in message
    > news:ULTpb.9248$...
    > > Ok, so I'm looking for advice on what sort of computer equipment I need

    > for
    > > the project I'm taking on. I work at a talent agency and we want to be

    > able
    > > to put together our actors' demo reels on DVD. Up to now, we have been

    > using
    > > video tape. For a bunch of different reasons that are pretty obvious, it
    > > would be better to have them on DVD. Generally, the reels will only be

    > 10-15
    > > minutes in length. We need the DVDs we make to be playable on standard

    DVD
    > > players, not just DVD-ROMs or whatever. We also need to be able to

    extract
    > > scenes from other DVDs and then save them permanently to the hard drive

    so
    > > that whenever we need to cut a new reel, we can do it relatively easily.
    > >
    > > So given what we want to do, what kind equipment and software do we

    need?
    > > I'm thinking we may just buy a new computer specifically for this task.

    > I've
    > > been given a budget of $4K or so, but I was hoping to do it for far

    less.
    > > Any recommendations would be much appreciated.
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    luminos, Nov 4, 2003
    #5
  6. Thanks for the input.

    What is a Pinnacle PCI analog to video direct MPEG or Canopus? Is that a
    video card? Software?
    Also, what is a Pioneer ca. AO6? A model of burner?

    Thanks again.


    "luminos" <> wrote in message
    news:VSVpb.297203$...
    > Ooops...Any Pioneer ca. A06.
    >
    > "luminos" <> wrote in message
    > news:TNVpb.4300502$...
    > > A PC ca. 1 ghz.
    > > Windows 2000 or XP
    > > Pinnacle PCI analog to video direct MPEG or Canopus(do not go AVI and
    > > convert...the time is not worth it for videotape). Get a
    > > hardware MPEG2 encoder.
    > > DVD Burner-Pioneer A04
    > > DVD Author or DVDXMAKER software.
    > >
    > > well under $2K.
    > >
    > > see www.videoguys.com for such.
    > >
    > > '
    > > "Marcellus Wallace" <> wrote in message
    > > news:ULTpb.9248$...
    > > > Ok, so I'm looking for advice on what sort of computer equipment I

    need
    > > for
    > > > the project I'm taking on. I work at a talent agency and we want to be

    > > able
    > > > to put together our actors' demo reels on DVD. Up to now, we have been

    > > using
    > > > video tape. For a bunch of different reasons that are pretty obvious,

    it
    > > > would be better to have them on DVD. Generally, the reels will only be

    > > 10-15
    > > > minutes in length. We need the DVDs we make to be playable on standard

    > DVD
    > > > players, not just DVD-ROMs or whatever. We also need to be able to

    > extract
    > > > scenes from other DVDs and then save them permanently to the hard

    drive
    > so
    > > > that whenever we need to cut a new reel, we can do it relatively

    easily.
    > > >
    > > > So given what we want to do, what kind equipment and software do we

    > need?
    > > > I'm thinking we may just buy a new computer specifically for this

    task.
    > > I've
    > > > been given a budget of $4K or so, but I was hoping to do it for far

    > less.
    > > > Any recommendations would be much appreciated.
    > > >
    > > >

    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    Marcellus Wallace, Nov 5, 2003
    #6
  7. Marcellus Wallace

    luminos Guest

    A06 DVD+/- R burner.
    Pinnacle PCI analog: Hardware and software for analog capture to hard disk.
    Canopus also makes such a system.

    Again, see www.videoguys.com. They will help you by phone to get the right
    stuff for what you need to do.

    Another option, of course, is to get a Panasonic DMR-80 for $500 that is a
    stand alone (no computer) recorder. Simply plug your camera in and record
    (no fancy menus or editing...but it is fast and easy).


    "Marcellus Wallace" <> wrote in message
    news:e9Zpb.9838$...
    > Thanks for the input.
    >
    > What is a Pinnacle PCI analog to video direct MPEG or Canopus? Is that a
    > video card? Software?
    > Also, what is a Pioneer ca. AO6? A model of burner?
    >
    > Thanks again.
    >
    >
    > "luminos" <> wrote in message
    > news:VSVpb.297203$...
    > > Ooops...Any Pioneer ca. A06.
    > >
    > > "luminos" <> wrote in message
    > > news:TNVpb.4300502$...
    > > > A PC ca. 1 ghz.
    > > > Windows 2000 or XP
    > > > Pinnacle PCI analog to video direct MPEG or Canopus(do not go AVI and
    > > > convert...the time is not worth it for videotape). Get a
    > > > hardware MPEG2 encoder.
    > > > DVD Burner-Pioneer A04
    > > > DVD Author or DVDXMAKER software.
    > > >
    > > > well under $2K.
    > > >
    > > > see www.videoguys.com for such.
    > > >
    > > > '
    > > > "Marcellus Wallace" <> wrote in message
    > > > news:ULTpb.9248$...
    > > > > Ok, so I'm looking for advice on what sort of computer equipment I

    > need
    > > > for
    > > > > the project I'm taking on. I work at a talent agency and we want to

    be
    > > > able
    > > > > to put together our actors' demo reels on DVD. Up to now, we have

    been
    > > > using
    > > > > video tape. For a bunch of different reasons that are pretty

    obvious,
    > it
    > > > > would be better to have them on DVD. Generally, the reels will only

    be
    > > > 10-15
    > > > > minutes in length. We need the DVDs we make to be playable on

    standard
    > > DVD
    > > > > players, not just DVD-ROMs or whatever. We also need to be able to

    > > extract
    > > > > scenes from other DVDs and then save them permanently to the hard

    > drive
    > > so
    > > > > that whenever we need to cut a new reel, we can do it relatively

    > easily.
    > > > >
    > > > > So given what we want to do, what kind equipment and software do we

    > > need?
    > > > > I'm thinking we may just buy a new computer specifically for this

    > task.
    > > > I've
    > > > > been given a budget of $4K or so, but I was hoping to do it for far

    > > less.
    > > > > Any recommendations would be much appreciated.
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > >

    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    luminos, Nov 5, 2003
    #7
  8. Hi Marcellus,

    Although you've gotten several excellent responses, the fact is that no
    one can advise you without one critical piece of information.

    You mention "demo reels". What are these? What format are they in? What
    media are they on?

    From your post, we know that the desired output is a DVD that'll play on
    any standard DVD player. But before we can advise you about what is
    necessary in the middle to accomplish your desired outout, we need to
    have a full definition of the input.

    Without knowing all the details, I'd suggest that you'll wind up
    committing at least two-thirds of your budget for hardware and software.
    Some of the hardware already recommended would very quickly prove to be
    inadequate for the task at hand.


    "Marcellus Wallace" <> wrote in message
    news:ULTpb.9248$...
    > Ok, so I'm looking for advice on what sort of computer equipment I

    need for
    > the project I'm taking on. I work at a talent agency and we want to be

    able
    > to put together our actors' demo reels on DVD. Up to now, we have been

    using
    > video tape. For a bunch of different reasons that are pretty obvious,

    it
    > would be better to have them on DVD. Generally, the reels will only be

    10-15
    > minutes in length. We need the DVDs we make to be playable on standard

    DVD
    > players, not just DVD-ROMs or whatever. We also need to be able to

    extract
    > scenes from other DVDs and then save them permanently to the hard

    drive so
    > that whenever we need to cut a new reel, we can do it relatively

    easily.
    >
    > So given what we want to do, what kind equipment and software do we

    need?
    > I'm thinking we may just buy a new computer specifically for this

    task. I've
    > been given a budget of $4K or so, but I was hoping to do it for far

    less.
    > Any recommendations would be much appreciated.
    >
    >
     
    Colon Terminus, Nov 5, 2003
    #8
  9. "Colon Terminus" <> wrote in message
    news:2h9qb.422368$...
    >
    > Hi Marcellus,
    >
    > Although you've gotten several excellent responses, the fact is that no
    > one can advise you without one critical piece of information.
    >
    > You mention "demo reels". What are these? What format are they in? What
    > media are they on?
    >
    > From your post, we know that the desired output is a DVD that'll play on
    > any standard DVD player. But before we can advise you about what is
    > necessary in the middle to accomplish your desired outout, we need to
    > have a full definition of the input.



    Good point. Demo reels are 10-15 minutes long. They are usually a few
    different scenes from an actor's appearances on film and television. Some
    of the stuff we have to transfer to the hard drive is on video tape and the
    rest of it is on DVD. So, for example, what I'd be doing is lifting a
    client's scene from a videotape of Friends, a scene from the Swordfish DVD,
    etc. I want to be able to have them all on the hard drive so I can cut a
    different reel for each actor depending on what job I'm pitching an actor
    him/her for. Anyway, we have been doing these on video tape up to this
    point, and as you can imagine it's time-consuming and the quality isn't that
    great. We want to make the switch to DVD because the quality is better and
    because we can do non-linear editing. I hope that helps explain our needs a
    little better. Any advice would be much appreciated.
     
    Marcellus Wallace, Nov 5, 2003
    #9
  10. Marcellus Wallace

    luminos Guest

    You cannot really improve the quality of videotape (analog) by transfering
    to DVD. In your case, I think the Canopus MVR1000 analog capture with a
    Pioneer A06 and DVDXMaker or MovieFactory or Workshop is the best idea since
    you want to work from hard drive.
     
    luminos, Nov 6, 2003
    #10
  11. Hi Marcellus,

    Okay, good, now we have a complete picture.

    Here's what you'll need for a professional workstation, not a home hobby
    setup.

    At least a 3 Ghz. Pentium-IV processor based system.
    Windows 2000 is better for A/V, but you may have to settle for XP.
    2GB DDR RAM.
    A reasonably sized hard disk to hold the O/S and applications.
    160 - 240 GB RAID0 for workspace.
    Top end Radeon or geForce video.
    Soundblaster Audigy2 audio.
    Logitech Z560 or Z680 speakers.
    A DVD reader (Lite-on makes a good one).
    A DVD burner from Pioneer or Plextor.
    A video capture device not subject to Macrovision. *

    * I'd recommend an extenal USB 2.0 device for this purpose. Personally,
    I like the Pinnacle DVC-150 along with a Macrovision killer from
    Lik-Sang. Both ADS Instant DVD 2.0 and Adaptech VideOh! DVD aren't
    subject to Macrovision.

    Software:
    You'll need DVD Decrypter - free
    TMPGEnc (excellent MPG tools) - free or under $50 for encoding
    Other free software ... see http://www.dvdrhelp.com
    As for authoring software, you gotta make your own choice. There's a lot
    of good stuff out there, especially from Adobe and Ulead.

    Miscellaneous:

    Most people consider the -R format to be more compatible with set-top
    players than the +R format, though players manufactured in the last
    couple of years shouldn't have a problem with either format.

    I don't think we have enought experience yet to know just how compatible
    DVDs or meida burned at 8X might be, caveat emptor.

    Depending on how many copies of a DVD you need to distribute, you might
    consider a stand-alone DVD duplicator as well.

    If I've omitted anything or you need additional advice, contact me via
    email and we can continue the discussion.



    "Marcellus Wallace" <> wrote in message
    news:4fbqb.10815$...
    >
    > "Colon Terminus" <> wrote in message
    > news:2h9qb.422368$...
    > >
    > > Hi Marcellus,
    > >
    > > Although you've gotten several excellent responses, the fact is that

    no
    > > one can advise you without one critical piece of information.
    > >
    > > You mention "demo reels". What are these? What format are they in?

    What
    > > media are they on?
    > >
    > > From your post, we know that the desired output is a DVD that'll

    play on
    > > any standard DVD player. But before we can advise you about what is
    > > necessary in the middle to accomplish your desired outout, we need

    to
    > > have a full definition of the input.

    >
    >
    > Good point. Demo reels are 10-15 minutes long. They are usually a

    few
    > different scenes from an actor's appearances on film and television.

    Some
    > of the stuff we have to transfer to the hard drive is on video tape

    and the
    > rest of it is on DVD. So, for example, what I'd be doing is lifting

    a
    > client's scene from a videotape of Friends, a scene from the Swordfish

    DVD,
    > etc. I want to be able to have them all on the hard drive so I can

    cut a
    > different reel for each actor depending on what job I'm pitching an

    actor
    > him/her for. Anyway, we have been doing these on video tape up to

    this
    > point, and as you can imagine it's time-consuming and the quality

    isn't that
    > great. We want to make the switch to DVD because the quality is

    better and
    > because we can do non-linear editing. I hope that helps explain our

    needs a
    > little better. Any advice would be much appreciated.
    >
    >
     
    Colon Terminus, Nov 7, 2003
    #11
  12. Marcellus Wallace

    Max Volume Guest

    In article <qCPqb.479751$>, Colon Terminus
    <> wrote:

    > Okay, good, now we have a complete picture.
    >
    > Here's what you'll need for a professional workstation, not a home hobby
    > setup.


    > A video capture device not subject to Macrovision. *


    Wake the **** up, man. You wouldn't know professional gear if it fell
    on you. Try a TBC, moron.
     
    Max Volume, Nov 7, 2003
    #12
  13. Marcellus Wallace

    Frode Guest

    -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    Hash: SHA1

    Colon Terminus wrote:
    >Okay, good, now we have a complete picture.
    >Here's what you'll need for a professional workstation, not a home hobby
    >setup.


    Why, then, do you go on to describe a home hobby setup? Half the stuff you
    list is irrelevant to his needs. Most of the rest is way over the top.


    - --
    Frode

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    iQA/AwUBP6wwuOXlGBWTt1afEQLxygCgro5+auUizW0ZfNBq/SgyW+EJCfAAnRUw
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    =Am0m
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    Frode, Nov 7, 2003
    #13
  14. "Frode" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    > Hash: SHA1
    >
    > Colon Terminus wrote:
    > >Okay, good, now we have a complete picture.
    > >Here's what you'll need for a professional workstation, not a home hobby
    > >setup.

    >
    > Why, then, do you go on to describe a home hobby setup? Half the stuff you
    > list is irrelevant to his needs. Most of the rest is way over the top.


    Ok, so what's not over the top? I don't want to overspend. Any suggestions
    would be much appreciated. Do I really need a 3 GHz processor? Can I get
    by with a 1.8? Do I really need RAID? I'm not opposed to spending money,
    but I don't want to do it if I don't need to.
     
    Marcellus Wallace, Nov 8, 2003
    #14
  15. Marcellus Wallace

    Dick Sidbury Guest

    Marcellus Wallace wrote:
    > "Frode" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >>-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    >>Hash: SHA1
    >>
    >>Colon Terminus wrote:
    >>
    >>>Okay, good, now we have a complete picture.
    >>>Here's what you'll need for a professional workstation, not a home hobby
    >>>setup.

    >>
    >>Why, then, do you go on to describe a home hobby setup? Half the stuff you
    >>list is irrelevant to his needs. Most of the rest is way over the top.

    >
    >
    > Ok, so what's not over the top? I don't want to overspend. Any suggestions
    > would be much appreciated. Do I really need a 3 GHz processor? Can I get
    > by with a 1.8? Do I really need RAID? I'm not opposed to spending money,
    > but I don't want to do it if I don't need to.
    >
    >

    you don't need raid. You also don't need a particularly good video
    card. Probably 1 gig of memory is sufficient. I'd recommend two disk
    drives, one for the O/S, applications and stored data, and one as a
    scratch disk for doing the editing on. You can't buy a disk that's too
    big. [ I actually use an AMD processor (2500+ I think) with an nvidia
    chipset motherboard in a Shuttle miniature case (XPC SN41G) with dual
    video built in about 1000 with 2 120gb drives and DVD burner but not
    icluding the cost of 2 monitors] but the experts seem to be
    recommending the P-IV with hyperthreading.
    Plus software

    dick
     
    Dick Sidbury, Nov 8, 2003
    #15
  16. Marcellus Wallace

    stacey Guest

    Colon Terminus wrote:

    >
    > Hi Marcellus,
    >
    > Okay, good, now we have a complete picture.
    >
    > Here's what you'll need for a professional workstation, not a home hobby
    > setup.
    >


    snip

    > Top end Radeon or geForce video.



    ??? What difference is that going to make? Why waste money of a "top end
    radeon" when something like a Matrox G550 would work better in 2D and is
    only $100?
    --

    Stacey
     
    stacey, Nov 8, 2003
    #16
  17. Marcellus Wallace

    stacey Guest

    Marcellus Wallace wrote:

    >
    > "Frode" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    >> Hash: SHA1
    >>
    >> Colon Terminus wrote:
    >> >Okay, good, now we have a complete picture.
    >> >Here's what you'll need for a professional workstation, not a home hobby
    >> >setup.

    >>
    >> Why, then, do you go on to describe a home hobby setup? Half the stuff
    >> you list is irrelevant to his needs. Most of the rest is way over the
    >> top.

    >
    > Ok, so what's not over the top? I don't want to overspend. Any
    > suggestions
    > would be much appreciated. Do I really need a 3 GHz processor?


    No but you need at LEAST a 2.4/800 P4.

    > Can I get
    > by with a 1.8?


    No

    > Do I really need RAID?


    No


    > I'm not opposed to spending money,
    > but I don't want to do it if I don't need to.


    Then don't waste it on a "top end radeon" and spend the money on a faster
    CPU.

    --

    Stacey
     
    stacey, Nov 8, 2003
    #17
  18. in article bohvae$1em715$-berlin.de, Dick Sidbury at
    wrote on 11/7/03 9:33 PM:

    > Marcellus Wallace wrote:
    >> "Frode" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>
    >>> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    >>> Hash: SHA1
    >>>
    >>> Colon Terminus wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Okay, good, now we have a complete picture.
    >>>> Here's what you'll need for a professional workstation, not a home hobby
    >>>> setup.
    >>>
    >>> Why, then, do you go on to describe a home hobby setup? Half the stuff you
    >>> list is irrelevant to his needs. Most of the rest is way over the top.

    >>
    >>
    >> Ok, so what's not over the top? I don't want to overspend. Any suggestions
    >> would be much appreciated. Do I really need a 3 GHz processor? Can I get
    >> by with a 1.8? Do I really need RAID? I'm not opposed to spending money,
    >> but I don't want to do it if I don't need to.
    >>
    >>

    > you don't need raid. You also don't need a particularly good video
    > card. Probably 1 gig of memory is sufficient. I'd recommend two disk
    > drives, one for the O/S, applications and stored data, and one as a
    > scratch disk for doing the editing on. You can't buy a disk that's too
    > big. [ I actually use an AMD processor (2500+ I think) with an nvidia
    > chipset motherboard in a Shuttle miniature case (XPC SN41G) with dual
    > video built in about 1000 with 2 120gb drives and DVD burner but not
    > icluding the cost of 2 monitors] but the experts seem to be
    > recommending the P-IV with hyperthreading.
    > Plus software
    >
    > dick
    >


    Though many of us who edit video and author DVDs professionally would highly
    recommend a Mac. Curious Marcellus, why are you not considering using a
    system that is universally reviewed as being better suited for media (video)
    production?

    Go ahead and get a PC and deal with all the issues and hassles, come back
    with your posts of, "this doesn't seem to work with that" and "my audio
    isn't synching", and....

    Max, where are you now?
     
    MR_ED_of_Course, Nov 8, 2003
    #18
  19. Marcellus Wallace

    Frode Guest

    -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    Hash: SHA1

    Marcellus Wallace wrote:
    >> Why, then, do you go on to describe a home hobby setup? Half the stuff
    >> you list is irrelevant to his needs. Most of the rest is way over the
    >> top.

    >Ok, so what's not over the top? I don't want to overspend. Any
    >suggestions would be much appreciated. Do I really need a 3 GHz
    >processor? Can I get by with a 1.8? Do I really need RAID? I'm not
    >opposed to spending money, but I don't want to do it if I don't need to.


    Others have sorta answered the above, so this'll be kinda redundant.

    No, you don't *need* a 3GHz CPU. However, since you mention some of your
    existing content is on VHS and you'd like to move it to DVD, CPU might be
    an issue depending on capture card and the codec you choose to store it
    with. Then again, if you spend a bit on the card chances are it has
    hardware mpeg2 encoding anyways so the CPU issue disappears again.

    I believe I've read many actually prefer to pipe analog video through a DV
    camcorder and out to the PC via firewire. The camcorder thus converts it to
    the DV codec, a pretty robust and low compression codec that's perfect for
    editing (each frame compressed individually as opposed to mpeg2).

    A gig of ram will do you just fine. When it comes to harddrive space
    getting a motherboard that supports RAID0 won't cost a whole lot. Seems
    most prosumer boards have it and that's been the case for a year couple of
    years. Since you're talking pretty short clips and limited editing though,
    you probably won't miss the added speed much though. I've edited hour long
    home videos on my box and after I lost a few hundred GB when a drive in my
    RAID0 broke years ago I haven't used it and still I don't have a speed
    issue with editing even if I use the OS drive. Using a separate drive for
    the data files is still a good recommendation though. And, of course, you
    don't want to pick up an old 5400 rpm drive. It, again, will depend on the
    data rate of the codec you wish to use. DV for example is roughly
    200MB/minute. DVD compatible mpeg2 much less so. For DV a 7200rpm ata100
    will keep up nicely (might want to opt for one of them "optimized for video
    editing" drives, although none of mine are and I've never had a problem).
    But if you start messing with codecs with even higher data rates you might
    start running into problems at some point. But that's easily fixed by
    adding a second drive and RAID0'ing the two data drives together. Not a
    high cost considering harddrives are cheap and your motherboard will likely
    have RAID unless you buy the cheapest POS card you can find. Which wouldn't
    be wise from a stability point of view either.

    You *are* likely going to be spending some time on this computer though. I
    wouldn't go "as cheap as I can get away with" on all components if I were
    you. A mid range 2.5ish CPU won't set you back much. Opting for a
    motherboard with RAID0 isn't much more expensive than one without. Was it
    $4000 you mentioned? You can get a more than powerful enough computer for
    well under half of that if you buy components and put them together
    (assuming that's an option). I'm not quite sure about the analog video you
    already have and might want to capture. You might want to post a specific
    request on that. The TV in on video cards aren't something I read a lot of
    praise about when it comes to capturing so you'll want opinions from people
    experienced with it. Unless you have access to a DV camcorder, which would
    mean you likely just need a $50 (probably less) firewire card and you're
    in business. Not all DV camcorders have analog inputs or can pipe it
    straight through though.


    - --
    Frode

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    Frode, Nov 8, 2003
    #19
  20. Hi Max,

    Thanks for your helpful comment.

    "Max Volume" <> wrote in message news:071120031828042342%...
    > In article <qCPqb.479751$>, Colon Terminus
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > > Okay, good, now we have a complete picture.
    > >
    > > Here's what you'll need for a professional workstation, not a home hobby
    > > setup.

    >
    > > A video capture device not subject to Macrovision. *

    >
    > Wake the **** up, man. You wouldn't know professional gear if it fell
    > on you. Try a TBC, moron.
     
    Colon Terminus, Nov 8, 2003
    #20
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