What certification do you recommend for a beginner?

Discussion in 'MCSA' started by Jeff, Sep 11, 2006.

  1. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    I'm transferring from a financial planning career to the IT field. I don't
    have any formal IT training...I've just sort of picked things up throughout
    the years. Nothing big at all...a peer-to-peer, some troubleshooting,
    helping others, etc. I'm trying to find my path (and, of course, an
    entry-level job here in the Lexington, KY area). I know I don't want to be a
    web designer, repair, or a programmer. From what little I know and have
    seen, it sounds like networking may be a big interest. Question: Based on
    your experience, what's the best way to narrow down my true interest (there's
    still so much I don't know)? Also, what certification would you recommend I
    begin thinking about? MCSE is definitely out of my present reach of course
    (and I'm not very sure that I would be good at actually designing networks),
    but the MCSA sounds more like my potential niche. What do YOU think?

    And, for Petesake, how do you find your way into an entry-level job without
    formal education? Catch-22...I need to get into the field in order to get
    hands-on experience, yet I have no direct experience in order to get into the
    field.

    Sorry for the length. I'm just searching and wanting to learn and want to
    put my true aptitudes to work.

    Many thanks!
    Jeff
    Jeff, Sep 11, 2006
    #1
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  2. Jeff

    Montreal MCT Guest

    Hi Jeff,

    It sounds like you have a bit of experience with Windows desktops and
    troubleshooting, so I would recommend that you start by looking into the
    Microsoft Certified Desktop Support Technician (MCDST) certification. It is
    what I call the entry-level cert - it is two exams on supporting users on
    Windows XP. I am not going to tell you that they are easy - when you are
    just starting out that would not help - but they are certainly simpler than
    that network-centric courses that you would take for the MCSA.

    I want to tell you by the way that five years ago I thought that MCSA and
    MCT were out of reach - your words about MCSE. Well if you take it easy and
    gradually then you can even one day be an MCA (Microsoft Certified
    Architect). Just set lower goals incrementally and before you know it,
    you'll be designing networks for corporations!

    Good luck and let us know how it goes.

    M
    --
    MDG, MCT
    MCSA (2003), MCSA (2000), MCDST.
    Certified Small Business Specialist
    Visit my blog at www.mitpro.ca/Blogs/tabid/59/BlogID/2/Default.aspx


    "Jeff" wrote:

    > I'm transferring from a financial planning career to the IT field. I don't
    > have any formal IT training...I've just sort of picked things up throughout
    > the years. Nothing big at all...a peer-to-peer, some troubleshooting,
    > helping others, etc. I'm trying to find my path (and, of course, an
    > entry-level job here in the Lexington, KY area). I know I don't want to be a
    > web designer, repair, or a programmer. From what little I know and have
    > seen, it sounds like networking may be a big interest. Question: Based on
    > your experience, what's the best way to narrow down my true interest (there's
    > still so much I don't know)? Also, what certification would you recommend I
    > begin thinking about? MCSE is definitely out of my present reach of course
    > (and I'm not very sure that I would be good at actually designing networks),
    > but the MCSA sounds more like my potential niche. What do YOU think?
    >
    > And, for Petesake, how do you find your way into an entry-level job without
    > formal education? Catch-22...I need to get into the field in order to get
    > hands-on experience, yet I have no direct experience in order to get into the
    > field.
    >
    > Sorry for the length. I'm just searching and wanting to learn and want to
    > put my true aptitudes to work.
    >
    > Many thanks!
    > Jeff
    Montreal MCT, Sep 12, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    "Montreal MCT" wrote:

    > Hi Jeff,
    >
    > It sounds like you have a bit of experience with Windows desktops and
    > troubleshooting, so I would recommend that you start by looking into the
    > Microsoft Certified Desktop Support Technician (MCDST) certification. It is
    > what I call the entry-level cert - it is two exams on supporting users on
    > Windows XP. I am not going to tell you that they are easy - when you are
    > just starting out that would not help - but they are certainly simpler than
    > that network-centric courses that you would take for the MCSA.
    >
    > I want to tell you by the way that five years ago I thought that MCSA and
    > MCT were out of reach - your words about MCSE. Well if you take it easy and
    > gradually then you can even one day be an MCA (Microsoft Certified
    > Architect). Just set lower goals incrementally and before you know it,
    > you'll be designing networks for corporations!
    >
    > Good luck and let us know how it goes.
    >
    > M
    > --
    > MDG, MCT
    > MCSA (2003), MCSA (2000), MCDST.
    > Certified Small Business Specialist
    > Visit my blog at www.mitpro.ca/Blogs/tabid/59/BlogID/2/Default.aspx
    >
    >
    > "Jeff" wrote:
    >
    > > I'm transferring from a financial planning career to the IT field. I don't
    > > have any formal IT training...I've just sort of picked things up throughout
    > > the years. Nothing big at all...a peer-to-peer, some troubleshooting,
    > > helping others, etc. I'm trying to find my path (and, of course, an
    > > entry-level job here in the Lexington, KY area). I know I don't want to be a
    > > web designer, repair, or a programmer. From what little I know and have
    > > seen, it sounds like networking may be a big interest. Question: Based on
    > > your experience, what's the best way to narrow down my true interest (there's
    > > still so much I don't know)? Also, what certification would you recommend I
    > > begin thinking about? MCSE is definitely out of my present reach of course
    > > (and I'm not very sure that I would be good at actually designing networks),
    > > but the MCSA sounds more like my potential niche. What do YOU think?
    > >
    > > And, for Petesake, how do you find your way into an entry-level job without
    > > formal education? Catch-22...I need to get into the field in order to get
    > > hands-on experience, yet I have no direct experience in order to get into the
    > > field.
    > >
    > > Sorry for the length. I'm just searching and wanting to learn and want to
    > > put my true aptitudes to work.
    > >
    > > Many thanks!
    > > Jeff



    That sounds like a great plan. In your opinion, is it pretty close to
    impossible to get a position somewhere until I get the MCDST?

    Thanks again.
    Jeff
    Jeff, Sep 12, 2006
    #3
  4. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    I think I responded in the wrong area. Sounds like a great plan you gave.
    Also, in your opinion, do you think it's pretty impossible to get my foot in
    the door someplace until I at least get the MCDST that you recommended??

    Have a great day. I'll leave you alone now.

    Jeff



    "Montreal MCT" wrote:

    > Hi Jeff,
    >
    > It sounds like you have a bit of experience with Windows desktops and
    > troubleshooting, so I would recommend that you start by looking into the
    > Microsoft Certified Desktop Support Technician (MCDST) certification. It is
    > what I call the entry-level cert - it is two exams on supporting users on
    > Windows XP. I am not going to tell you that they are easy - when you are
    > just starting out that would not help - but they are certainly simpler than
    > that network-centric courses that you would take for the MCSA.
    >
    > I want to tell you by the way that five years ago I thought that MCSA and
    > MCT were out of reach - your words about MCSE. Well if you take it easy and
    > gradually then you can even one day be an MCA (Microsoft Certified
    > Architect). Just set lower goals incrementally and before you know it,
    > you'll be designing networks for corporations!
    >
    > Good luck and let us know how it goes.
    >
    > M
    > --
    > MDG, MCT
    > MCSA (2003), MCSA (2000), MCDST.
    > Certified Small Business Specialist
    > Visit my blog at www.mitpro.ca/Blogs/tabid/59/BlogID/2/Default.aspx
    >
    >
    > "Jeff" wrote:
    >
    > > I'm transferring from a financial planning career to the IT field. I don't
    > > have any formal IT training...I've just sort of picked things up throughout
    > > the years. Nothing big at all...a peer-to-peer, some troubleshooting,
    > > helping others, etc. I'm trying to find my path (and, of course, an
    > > entry-level job here in the Lexington, KY area). I know I don't want to be a
    > > web designer, repair, or a programmer. From what little I know and have
    > > seen, it sounds like networking may be a big interest. Question: Based on
    > > your experience, what's the best way to narrow down my true interest (there's
    > > still so much I don't know)? Also, what certification would you recommend I
    > > begin thinking about? MCSE is definitely out of my present reach of course
    > > (and I'm not very sure that I would be good at actually designing networks),
    > > but the MCSA sounds more like my potential niche. What do YOU think?
    > >
    > > And, for Petesake, how do you find your way into an entry-level job without
    > > formal education? Catch-22...I need to get into the field in order to get
    > > hands-on experience, yet I have no direct experience in order to get into the
    > > field.
    > >
    > > Sorry for the length. I'm just searching and wanting to learn and want to
    > > put my true aptitudes to work.
    > >
    > > Many thanks!
    > > Jeff
    Jeff, Sep 12, 2006
    #4
  5. Jeff

    TBone Guest

    And on the eigth day <>
    did cause the electrons to come together and form the following words:

    > I think I responded in the wrong area. Sounds like a great plan you
    > gave. Also, in your opinion, do you think it's pretty impossible to
    > get my foot in the door someplace until I at least get the MCDST that
    > you recommended??


    Depends. Have a look at what companies in your area are requiring. For the
    most part, certs will get your resume past the HR bots, but any real
    experience you have will be what could get you the job.

    --
    T-Bone
    MCNGP XL
    TBone, Sep 13, 2006
    #5
  6. Jeff

    Montreal MCT Guest

    Hi Jeff,

    I'll be honest with you, it will depend on the size of the company. I have
    a friend who does first level technical support for a company that puts
    wireless internet into hotels. He is very bright, knows Windows pretty well,
    but does not have any certs. A few weeks ago he was competing for a
    promotion to second level, and he lost out to a guy who was no smarter than
    he, but had a couple of certs - low level certs, but certs nonetheless.

    Disappointed at being passed over he is now looking for a job and people
    tell him point blank that he needs to get certified before they consider him.

    When I passed my first exam I was quite pleased with myself, and rested on
    my laurels having passed a single exam. The people who saw my business card
    did not know if I was MCP with a sales exam or with three infrastructure
    exams, they just knew I was certified. Now a lot of companies want to see
    your transcript and see real experience behind you. That is why the
    relatively new entry-level cert that is MCDST is such a good idea, because it
    seperates the wheat from the chaff.

    In short you do not NEED any certs, but they will get you in the door
    quicker and in more places. Good luck and let us knwo how your search goes!

    M
    --
    MDG, MCT
    MCSA (2003), MCSA (2000), MCDST.
    Certified Small Business Specialist
    Visit my blog at www.mitpro.ca/Blogs/tabid/59/BlogID/2/Default.aspx

    "Jeff" wrote:

    > I think I responded in the wrong area. Sounds like a great plan you gave.
    > Also, in your opinion, do you think it's pretty impossible to get my foot in
    > the door someplace until I at least get the MCDST that you recommended??
    >
    > Have a great day. I'll leave you alone now.
    >
    > Jeff
    >
    >
    >
    > "Montreal MCT" wrote:
    >
    > > Hi Jeff,
    > >
    > > It sounds like you have a bit of experience with Windows desktops and
    > > troubleshooting, so I would recommend that you start by looking into the
    > > Microsoft Certified Desktop Support Technician (MCDST) certification. It is
    > > what I call the entry-level cert - it is two exams on supporting users on
    > > Windows XP. I am not going to tell you that they are easy - when you are
    > > just starting out that would not help - but they are certainly simpler than
    > > that network-centric courses that you would take for the MCSA.
    > >
    > > I want to tell you by the way that five years ago I thought that MCSA and
    > > MCT were out of reach - your words about MCSE. Well if you take it easy and
    > > gradually then you can even one day be an MCA (Microsoft Certified
    > > Architect). Just set lower goals incrementally and before you know it,
    > > you'll be designing networks for corporations!
    > >
    > > Good luck and let us know how it goes.
    > >
    > > M
    > > --
    > > MDG, MCT
    > > MCSA (2003), MCSA (2000), MCDST.
    > > Certified Small Business Specialist
    > > Visit my blog at www.mitpro.ca/Blogs/tabid/59/BlogID/2/Default.aspx
    > >
    > >
    > > "Jeff" wrote:
    > >
    > > > I'm transferring from a financial planning career to the IT field. I don't
    > > > have any formal IT training...I've just sort of picked things up throughout
    > > > the years. Nothing big at all...a peer-to-peer, some troubleshooting,
    > > > helping others, etc. I'm trying to find my path (and, of course, an
    > > > entry-level job here in the Lexington, KY area). I know I don't want to be a
    > > > web designer, repair, or a programmer. From what little I know and have
    > > > seen, it sounds like networking may be a big interest. Question: Based on
    > > > your experience, what's the best way to narrow down my true interest (there's
    > > > still so much I don't know)? Also, what certification would you recommend I
    > > > begin thinking about? MCSE is definitely out of my present reach of course
    > > > (and I'm not very sure that I would be good at actually designing networks),
    > > > but the MCSA sounds more like my potential niche. What do YOU think?
    > > >
    > > > And, for Petesake, how do you find your way into an entry-level job without
    > > > formal education? Catch-22...I need to get into the field in order to get
    > > > hands-on experience, yet I have no direct experience in order to get into the
    > > > field.
    > > >
    > > > Sorry for the length. I'm just searching and wanting to learn and want to
    > > > put my true aptitudes to work.
    > > >
    > > > Many thanks!
    > > > Jeff
    Montreal MCT, Sep 13, 2006
    #6
  7. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    You both have been teriffic. I bought the MCDST study book and guide
    tonight. I'll be checking the forums often. Good luck to all.

    Thank you very much!!!

    Jeff



    "Montreal MCT" wrote:

    > Hi Jeff,
    >
    > I'll be honest with you, it will depend on the size of the company. I have
    > a friend who does first level technical support for a company that puts
    > wireless internet into hotels. He is very bright, knows Windows pretty well,
    > but does not have any certs. A few weeks ago he was competing for a
    > promotion to second level, and he lost out to a guy who was no smarter than
    > he, but had a couple of certs - low level certs, but certs nonetheless.
    >
    > Disappointed at being passed over he is now looking for a job and people
    > tell him point blank that he needs to get certified before they consider him.
    >
    > When I passed my first exam I was quite pleased with myself, and rested on
    > my laurels having passed a single exam. The people who saw my business card
    > did not know if I was MCP with a sales exam or with three infrastructure
    > exams, they just knew I was certified. Now a lot of companies want to see
    > your transcript and see real experience behind you. That is why the
    > relatively new entry-level cert that is MCDST is such a good idea, because it
    > seperates the wheat from the chaff.
    >
    > In short you do not NEED any certs, but they will get you in the door
    > quicker and in more places. Good luck and let us knwo how your search goes!
    >
    > M
    > --
    > MDG, MCT
    > MCSA (2003), MCSA (2000), MCDST.
    > Certified Small Business Specialist
    > Visit my blog at www.mitpro.ca/Blogs/tabid/59/BlogID/2/Default.aspx
    >
    > "Jeff" wrote:
    >
    > > I think I responded in the wrong area. Sounds like a great plan you gave.
    > > Also, in your opinion, do you think it's pretty impossible to get my foot in
    > > the door someplace until I at least get the MCDST that you recommended??
    > >
    > > Have a great day. I'll leave you alone now.
    > >
    > > Jeff
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > "Montreal MCT" wrote:
    > >
    > > > Hi Jeff,
    > > >
    > > > It sounds like you have a bit of experience with Windows desktops and
    > > > troubleshooting, so I would recommend that you start by looking into the
    > > > Microsoft Certified Desktop Support Technician (MCDST) certification. It is
    > > > what I call the entry-level cert - it is two exams on supporting users on
    > > > Windows XP. I am not going to tell you that they are easy - when you are
    > > > just starting out that would not help - but they are certainly simpler than
    > > > that network-centric courses that you would take for the MCSA.
    > > >
    > > > I want to tell you by the way that five years ago I thought that MCSA and
    > > > MCT were out of reach - your words about MCSE. Well if you take it easy and
    > > > gradually then you can even one day be an MCA (Microsoft Certified
    > > > Architect). Just set lower goals incrementally and before you know it,
    > > > you'll be designing networks for corporations!
    > > >
    > > > Good luck and let us know how it goes.
    > > >
    > > > M
    > > > --
    > > > MDG, MCT
    > > > MCSA (2003), MCSA (2000), MCDST.
    > > > Certified Small Business Specialist
    > > > Visit my blog at www.mitpro.ca/Blogs/tabid/59/BlogID/2/Default.aspx
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > "Jeff" wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > I'm transferring from a financial planning career to the IT field. I don't
    > > > > have any formal IT training...I've just sort of picked things up throughout
    > > > > the years. Nothing big at all...a peer-to-peer, some troubleshooting,
    > > > > helping others, etc. I'm trying to find my path (and, of course, an
    > > > > entry-level job here in the Lexington, KY area). I know I don't want to be a
    > > > > web designer, repair, or a programmer. From what little I know and have
    > > > > seen, it sounds like networking may be a big interest. Question: Based on
    > > > > your experience, what's the best way to narrow down my true interest (there's
    > > > > still so much I don't know)? Also, what certification would you recommend I
    > > > > begin thinking about? MCSE is definitely out of my present reach of course
    > > > > (and I'm not very sure that I would be good at actually designing networks),
    > > > > but the MCSA sounds more like my potential niche. What do YOU think?
    > > > >
    > > > > And, for Petesake, how do you find your way into an entry-level job without
    > > > > formal education? Catch-22...I need to get into the field in order to get
    > > > > hands-on experience, yet I have no direct experience in order to get into the
    > > > > field.
    > > > >
    > > > > Sorry for the length. I'm just searching and wanting to learn and want to
    > > > > put my true aptitudes to work.
    > > > >
    > > > > Many thanks!
    > > > > Jeff
    Jeff, Sep 13, 2006
    #7
  8. Jeff

    Montreal MCT Guest

    Jeff I wish you the best of luck! Let us know how it goes. If you need
    anything you know where to find us!

    M
    --
    MDG, MCT
    MCSA (2003), MCSA (2000), MCDST.
    Certified Small Business Specialist
    Visit my blog at www.mitpro.ca/Blogs/tabid/59/BlogID/2/Default.aspx


    "Jeff" wrote:

    > You both have been teriffic. I bought the MCDST study book and guide
    > tonight. I'll be checking the forums often. Good luck to all.
    >
    > Thank you very much!!!
    >
    > Jeff
    >
    >
    >
    > "Montreal MCT" wrote:
    >
    > > Hi Jeff,
    > >
    > > I'll be honest with you, it will depend on the size of the company. I have
    > > a friend who does first level technical support for a company that puts
    > > wireless internet into hotels. He is very bright, knows Windows pretty well,
    > > but does not have any certs. A few weeks ago he was competing for a
    > > promotion to second level, and he lost out to a guy who was no smarter than
    > > he, but had a couple of certs - low level certs, but certs nonetheless.
    > >
    > > Disappointed at being passed over he is now looking for a job and people
    > > tell him point blank that he needs to get certified before they consider him.
    > >
    > > When I passed my first exam I was quite pleased with myself, and rested on
    > > my laurels having passed a single exam. The people who saw my business card
    > > did not know if I was MCP with a sales exam or with three infrastructure
    > > exams, they just knew I was certified. Now a lot of companies want to see
    > > your transcript and see real experience behind you. That is why the
    > > relatively new entry-level cert that is MCDST is such a good idea, because it
    > > seperates the wheat from the chaff.
    > >
    > > In short you do not NEED any certs, but they will get you in the door
    > > quicker and in more places. Good luck and let us knwo how your search goes!
    > >
    > > M
    > > --
    > > MDG, MCT
    > > MCSA (2003), MCSA (2000), MCDST.
    > > Certified Small Business Specialist
    > > Visit my blog at www.mitpro.ca/Blogs/tabid/59/BlogID/2/Default.aspx
    > >
    > > "Jeff" wrote:
    > >
    > > > I think I responded in the wrong area. Sounds like a great plan you gave.
    > > > Also, in your opinion, do you think it's pretty impossible to get my foot in
    > > > the door someplace until I at least get the MCDST that you recommended??
    > > >
    > > > Have a great day. I'll leave you alone now.
    > > >
    > > > Jeff
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > "Montreal MCT" wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > Hi Jeff,
    > > > >
    > > > > It sounds like you have a bit of experience with Windows desktops and
    > > > > troubleshooting, so I would recommend that you start by looking into the
    > > > > Microsoft Certified Desktop Support Technician (MCDST) certification. It is
    > > > > what I call the entry-level cert - it is two exams on supporting users on
    > > > > Windows XP. I am not going to tell you that they are easy - when you are
    > > > > just starting out that would not help - but they are certainly simpler than
    > > > > that network-centric courses that you would take for the MCSA.
    > > > >
    > > > > I want to tell you by the way that five years ago I thought that MCSA and
    > > > > MCT were out of reach - your words about MCSE. Well if you take it easy and
    > > > > gradually then you can even one day be an MCA (Microsoft Certified
    > > > > Architect). Just set lower goals incrementally and before you know it,
    > > > > you'll be designing networks for corporations!
    > > > >
    > > > > Good luck and let us know how it goes.
    > > > >
    > > > > M
    > > > > --
    > > > > MDG, MCT
    > > > > MCSA (2003), MCSA (2000), MCDST.
    > > > > Certified Small Business Specialist
    > > > > Visit my blog at www.mitpro.ca/Blogs/tabid/59/BlogID/2/Default.aspx
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > > "Jeff" wrote:
    > > > >
    > > > > > I'm transferring from a financial planning career to the IT field. I don't
    > > > > > have any formal IT training...I've just sort of picked things up throughout
    > > > > > the years. Nothing big at all...a peer-to-peer, some troubleshooting,
    > > > > > helping others, etc. I'm trying to find my path (and, of course, an
    > > > > > entry-level job here in the Lexington, KY area). I know I don't want to be a
    > > > > > web designer, repair, or a programmer. From what little I know and have
    > > > > > seen, it sounds like networking may be a big interest. Question: Based on
    > > > > > your experience, what's the best way to narrow down my true interest (there's
    > > > > > still so much I don't know)? Also, what certification would you recommend I
    > > > > > begin thinking about? MCSE is definitely out of my present reach of course
    > > > > > (and I'm not very sure that I would be good at actually designing networks),
    > > > > > but the MCSA sounds more like my potential niche. What do YOU think?
    > > > > >
    > > > > > And, for Petesake, how do you find your way into an entry-level job without
    > > > > > formal education? Catch-22...I need to get into the field in order to get
    > > > > > hands-on experience, yet I have no direct experience in order to get into the
    > > > > > field.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Sorry for the length. I'm just searching and wanting to learn and want to
    > > > > > put my true aptitudes to work.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Many thanks!
    > > > > > Jeff
    Montreal MCT, Sep 13, 2006
    #8
  9. Jeff

    venkey Guest

    hi,
    anyone please help me Is there a certification program for Mircosoft
    Exchange Server 2000.
    --
    ---
    venkey


    "Jeff" wrote:

    > I'm transferring from a financial planning career to the IT field. I don't
    > have any formal IT training...I've just sort of picked things up throughout
    > the years. Nothing big at all...a peer-to-peer, some troubleshooting,
    > helping others, etc. I'm trying to find my path (and, of course, an
    > entry-level job here in the Lexington, KY area). I know I don't want to be a
    > web designer, repair, or a programmer. From what little I know and have
    > seen, it sounds like networking may be a big interest. Question: Based on
    > your experience, what's the best way to narrow down my true interest (there's
    > still so much I don't know)? Also, what certification would you recommend I
    > begin thinking about? MCSE is definitely out of my present reach of course
    > (and I'm not very sure that I would be good at actually designing networks),
    > but the MCSA sounds more like my potential niche. What do YOU think?
    >
    > And, for Petesake, how do you find your way into an entry-level job without
    > formal education? Catch-22...I need to get into the field in order to get
    > hands-on experience, yet I have no direct experience in order to get into the
    > field.
    >
    > Sorry for the length. I'm just searching and wanting to learn and want to
    > put my true aptitudes to work.
    >
    > Many thanks!
    > Jeff
    venkey, Sep 15, 2006
    #9
  10. Jeff

    Montreal MCT Guest

    Hi Venjey,

    There are two courses on Microsoft Exchange Server 2000:

    1572: Implementing and Managing Microsoft® Exchange 2000 which prepares you
    for Exam 70-224, Installing, Configuring, and Administering Microsoft
    Exchange 2000 Server


    and

    1573: Designing Microsoft® Exchange 2000 for the Enterprise which prepares
    you for Exam 70-225, Designing and Deploying a Messaging Infrastructure with
    Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server.

    Although both of these exams are electives for the MCSE on Windows 2000
    certification, there is no specific Exchange cert (though there is MCSA:
    Messaging and MCSE: Messaging).

    Good luck!

    M

    --
    MDG, MCT
    MCSA (2003), MCSA (2000), MCDST.
    Certified Small Business Specialist
    Visit my blog at www.mitpro.ca/Blogs/tabid/59/BlogID/2/Default.aspx


    "venkey" wrote:

    > hi,
    > anyone please help me Is there a certification program for Mircosoft
    > Exchange Server 2000.
    > --
    > ---
    > venkey
    >
    >
    > "Jeff" wrote:
    >
    > > I'm transferring from a financial planning career to the IT field. I don't
    > > have any formal IT training...I've just sort of picked things up throughout
    > > the years. Nothing big at all...a peer-to-peer, some troubleshooting,
    > > helping others, etc. I'm trying to find my path (and, of course, an
    > > entry-level job here in the Lexington, KY area). I know I don't want to be a
    > > web designer, repair, or a programmer. From what little I know and have
    > > seen, it sounds like networking may be a big interest. Question: Based on
    > > your experience, what's the best way to narrow down my true interest (there's
    > > still so much I don't know)? Also, what certification would you recommend I
    > > begin thinking about? MCSE is definitely out of my present reach of course
    > > (and I'm not very sure that I would be good at actually designing networks),
    > > but the MCSA sounds more like my potential niche. What do YOU think?
    > >
    > > And, for Petesake, how do you find your way into an entry-level job without
    > > formal education? Catch-22...I need to get into the field in order to get
    > > hands-on experience, yet I have no direct experience in order to get into the
    > > field.
    > >
    > > Sorry for the length. I'm just searching and wanting to learn and want to
    > > put my true aptitudes to work.
    > >
    > > Many thanks!
    > > Jeff
    Montreal MCT, Sep 15, 2006
    #10
  11. Montreal MCT wrote:
    > Jeff I wish you the best of luck! Let us know how it goes. If you need
    > anything you know where to find us!


    Hold on!!! Let me guess? Perhaps in Montreal? Perhaps with a bowl of
    poutine? Damn! I am good at this!!

    >
    > M



    --
    Rowdy Yates
    MCNGP Thug #39

    "I'm thirtynine with a bullet
    Got my finger on the trigger, I'm gonna pull it"
    Rowdy Yates, MCNGP #39, Sep 16, 2006
    #11
  12. Jeff

    Montreal MCT Guest

    Poutine... don't make me vomit. Now if you said with a good smoked meat
    sandwich from Schwartz's Deli I might think you knew Montreal but Poutine?
    Really... Instant blocked articles... insert lunch at BelPro for fast results.

    M
    --
    MDG, MCT
    MCSA (2003), MCSA (2000), MCDST.
    Certified Small Business Specialist
    Visit my blog at www.mitpro.ca/Blogs/tabid/59/BlogID/2/Default.aspx


    "Rowdy Yates, MCNGP #39" wrote:

    > Montreal MCT wrote:
    > > Jeff I wish you the best of luck! Let us know how it goes. If you need
    > > anything you know where to find us!

    >
    > Hold on!!! Let me guess? Perhaps in Montreal? Perhaps with a bowl of
    > poutine? Damn! I am good at this!!
    >
    > >
    > > M

    >
    >
    > --
    > Rowdy Yates
    > MCNGP Thug #39
    >
    > "I'm thirtynine with a bullet
    > Got my finger on the trigger, I'm gonna pull it"
    >
    Montreal MCT, Sep 16, 2006
    #12
  13. Jeff

    venkey Guest

    Hi Montreal,
    Thanks a lot for providing me the information.

    ---
    venkey


    "Montreal MCT" wrote:

    > Hi Venjey,
    >
    > There are two courses on Microsoft Exchange Server 2000:
    >
    > 1572: Implementing and Managing Microsoft® Exchange 2000 which prepares you
    > for Exam 70-224, Installing, Configuring, and Administering Microsoft
    > Exchange 2000 Server
    >
    >
    > and
    >
    > 1573: Designing Microsoft® Exchange 2000 for the Enterprise which prepares
    > you for Exam 70-225, Designing and Deploying a Messaging Infrastructure with
    > Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server.
    >
    > Although both of these exams are electives for the MCSE on Windows 2000
    > certification, there is no specific Exchange cert (though there is MCSA:
    > Messaging and MCSE: Messaging).
    >
    > Good luck!
    >
    > M
    >
    > --
    > MDG, MCT
    > MCSA (2003), MCSA (2000), MCDST.
    > Certified Small Business Specialist
    > Visit my blog at www.mitpro.ca/Blogs/tabid/59/BlogID/2/Default.aspx
    >
    >
    > "venkey" wrote:
    >
    > > hi,
    > > anyone please help me Is there a certification program for Mircosoft
    > > Exchange Server 2000.
    > > --
    > > ---
    > > venkey
    > >
    > >
    > > "Jeff" wrote:
    > >
    > > > I'm transferring from a financial planning career to the IT field. I don't
    > > > have any formal IT training...I've just sort of picked things up throughout
    > > > the years. Nothing big at all...a peer-to-peer, some troubleshooting,
    > > > helping others, etc. I'm trying to find my path (and, of course, an
    > > > entry-level job here in the Lexington, KY area). I know I don't want to be a
    > > > web designer, repair, or a programmer. From what little I know and have
    > > > seen, it sounds like networking may be a big interest. Question: Based on
    > > > your experience, what's the best way to narrow down my true interest (there's
    > > > still so much I don't know)? Also, what certification would you recommend I
    > > > begin thinking about? MCSE is definitely out of my present reach of course
    > > > (and I'm not very sure that I would be good at actually designing networks),
    > > > but the MCSA sounds more like my potential niche. What do YOU think?
    > > >
    > > > And, for Petesake, how do you find your way into an entry-level job without
    > > > formal education? Catch-22...I need to get into the field in order to get
    > > > hands-on experience, yet I have no direct experience in order to get into the
    > > > field.
    > > >
    > > > Sorry for the length. I'm just searching and wanting to learn and want to
    > > > put my true aptitudes to work.
    > > >
    > > > Many thanks!
    > > > Jeff
    venkey, Sep 16, 2006
    #13
  14. venkey wrote:
    > Hi Montreal,
    > Thanks a lot for providing me the information.


    Keep the the cr@ppy work!! It suits you.

    >
    > ---
    > venkey
    >
    >
    > "Montreal MCT" wrote:
    >
    >> Hi Venjey,
    >>
    >> There are two courses on Microsoft Exchange Server 2000:
    >>
    >> 1572: Implementing and Managing Microsoft® Exchange 2000 which prepares you
    >> for Exam 70-224, Installing, Configuring, and Administering Microsoft
    >> Exchange 2000 Server
    >>
    >>
    >> and
    >>
    >> 1573: Designing Microsoft® Exchange 2000 for the Enterprise which prepares
    >> you for Exam 70-225, Designing and Deploying a Messaging Infrastructure with
    >> Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server.
    >>
    >> Although both of these exams are electives for the MCSE on Windows 2000
    >> certification, there is no specific Exchange cert (though there is MCSA:
    >> Messaging and MCSE: Messaging).
    >>
    >> Good luck!
    >>
    >> M
    >>
    >> --
    >> MDG, MCT
    >> MCSA (2003), MCSA (2000), MCDST.
    >> Certified Small Business Specialist
    >> Visit my blog at www.mitpro.ca/Blogs/tabid/59/BlogID/2/Default.aspx
    >>
    >>
    >> "venkey" wrote:
    >>
    >>> hi,
    >>> anyone please help me Is there a certification program for Mircosoft
    >>> Exchange Server 2000.
    >>> --
    >>> ---
    >>> venkey
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "Jeff" wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I'm transferring from a financial planning career to the IT field. I don't
    >>>> have any formal IT training...I've just sort of picked things up throughout
    >>>> the years. Nothing big at all...a peer-to-peer, some troubleshooting,
    >>>> helping others, etc. I'm trying to find my path (and, of course, an
    >>>> entry-level job here in the Lexington, KY area). I know I don't want to be a
    >>>> web designer, repair, or a programmer. From what little I know and have
    >>>> seen, it sounds like networking may be a big interest. Question: Based on
    >>>> your experience, what's the best way to narrow down my true interest (there's
    >>>> still so much I don't know)? Also, what certification would you recommend I
    >>>> begin thinking about? MCSE is definitely out of my present reach of course
    >>>> (and I'm not very sure that I would be good at actually designing networks),
    >>>> but the MCSA sounds more like my potential niche. What do YOU think?
    >>>>
    >>>> And, for Petesake, how do you find your way into an entry-level job without
    >>>> formal education? Catch-22...I need to get into the field in order to get
    >>>> hands-on experience, yet I have no direct experience in order to get into the
    >>>> field.
    >>>>
    >>>> Sorry for the length. I'm just searching and wanting to learn and want to
    >>>> put my true aptitudes to work.
    >>>>
    >>>> Many thanks!
    >>>> Jeff



    --
    Rowdy Yates
    MCNGP Thug #39

    "I'm thirtynine with a bullet
    Got my finger on the trigger, I'm gonna pull it"
    Rowdy Yates, MCNGP #39, Sep 16, 2006
    #14
    1. Advertising

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