What are these hose clamps called?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Pennywise@DerryMaine.Gov, Aug 15, 2007.

  1. Guest

    , Aug 15, 2007
    #1
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  2. pcbutts1 Guest

    Foreign car? They are called spring clamps made in China
    http://hose-clamp.chinese-suppliers.com/a_t-bolt_clamp.htm


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    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > Anybody know what these clamps are called? I've got them on the fuel,
    > Power Steering, and transmission cooling lines.
    >
    > http://www.shakyparts.com/cgi-bin/image/templates/5905lit.jpg
    > or
    > http://us1.webpublications.com.au/static/images/articles/i26/2692_9lo.jpg
    >
    > I've seen "Fuel line clamps", "T-clamps", "spring clamps"...
    >
    > But I need a tool to spread/open them and those descriptions aren't
    > working.
    > --
    >
    > http://www.stambaughfamily.com/bitterroot.html
    pcbutts1, Aug 15, 2007
    #2
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  3. pcbutts1 Guest

    I use a pair of pliers to open them or channel locks.

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    H. Lipman, Max M Wachtell III aka What's in a Name?, Fitz,
    Rhonda Lea Kirk, Meat Plow, F Kwatu F, George Orwell



    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > Anybody know what these clamps are called? I've got them on the fuel,
    > Power Steering, and transmission cooling lines.
    >
    > http://www.shakyparts.com/cgi-bin/image/templates/5905lit.jpg
    > or
    > http://us1.webpublications.com.au/static/images/articles/i26/2692_9lo.jpg
    >
    > I've seen "Fuel line clamps", "T-clamps", "spring clamps"...
    >
    > But I need a tool to spread/open them and those descriptions aren't
    > working.
    > --
    >
    > http://www.stambaughfamily.com/bitterroot.html
    pcbutts1, Aug 15, 2007
    #3
  4. Guest

    "pcbutts1" <> wrote:

    >I use a pair of pliers to open them or channel locks.


    Ya, used that before and did on these clamps, but putting them on is
    going to be different, they need to be expanded beyond even.

    Thanks
    --
    Over 1,700 Arcade Manuals in PDF Format!
    http://ascii.textfiles.com/archives/000454.html
    , Aug 15, 2007
    #4
  5. WhzzKdd Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > Anybody know what these clamps are called? I've got them on the fuel,
    > Power Steering, and transmission cooling lines.
    >
    > http://www.shakyparts.com/cgi-bin/image/templates/5905lit.jpg
    > or
    > http://us1.webpublications.com.au/static/images/articles/i26/2692_9lo.jpg
    >
    > I've seen "Fuel line clamps", "T-clamps", "spring clamps"...
    >
    > But I need a tool to spread/open them and those descriptions aren't
    > working.
    >

    Those things suck! I replace them whenever I can.
    WhzzKdd, Aug 15, 2007
    #5
  6. tom Guest

    wrote:
    > "pcbutts1" <> wrote:
    >
    >> I use a pair of pliers to open them or channel locks.

    >
    > Ya, used that before and did on these clamps, but putting them on is
    > going to be different, they need to be expanded beyond even.
    >
    > Thanks


    Those clamps are basically for factory installations and aren't really made
    to be re-used. Try something like this for replacement.

    http://www.breezeclamps.com/products.htm
    tom, Aug 15, 2007
    #6
  7. Vanguard Guest

    Pennywise wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > Anybody know what these clamps are called? I've got them on the
    > fuel,
    > Power Steering, and transmission cooling lines.
    >
    > http://www.shakyparts.com/cgi-bin/image/templates/5905lit.jpg
    >
    > But I need a tool to spread/open them and those descriptions aren't
    > working.



    A slipjoint or plumber's pliers works. Just place the jaws against
    the tangs and squeeze.
    Vanguard, Aug 15, 2007
    #7
  8. Whiskers Guest

    On 2007-08-15, <> wrote:
    >
    > Anybody know what these clamps are called? I've got them on the fuel,
    > Power Steering, and transmission cooling lines.
    >
    > http://www.shakyparts.com/cgi-bin/image/templates/5905lit.jpg
    > or
    > http://us1.webpublications.com.au/static/images/articles/i26/2692_9lo.jpg
    >
    > I've seen "Fuel line clamps", "T-clamps", "spring clamps"...
    >
    > But I need a tool to spread/open them and those descriptions aren't
    > working.


    There are special tools known as 'hose clamp pliers' but you might get away
    with standard pliers or improvise by twisting a loop of strong wire as a
    'spanish windlass' - but be careful! Those springs can be powerful.

    You might find this helpful
    <http://images.google.com/images?gbv=1&svnum=10&um=1&hl=en&client=opera&rls
    =en&q=hose+clamp&btnG=Search+Images> or <http://shortlinks.co.uk/3k1>.
    The screw-driver operated type is usually called 'jubilee clip' here in
    the UK.

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
    Whiskers, Aug 15, 2007
    #8
  9. HEMI-Powered Guest

    Whiskers added these comments in the current discussion du jour
    ....

    >> Anybody know what these clamps are called? I've got them on
    >> the fuel, Power Steering, and transmission cooling lines.
    >>
    >> http://www.shakyparts.com/cgi-bin/image/templates/5905lit.jpg
    >> or
    >> http://us1.webpublications.com.au/static/images/articles/i26/2
    >> 692_9lo.j pg
    >>
    >> I've seen "Fuel line clamps", "T-clamps", "spring clamps"...
    >>
    >> But I need a tool to spread/open them and those descriptions
    >> aren't working.

    >
    > There are special tools known as 'hose clamp pliers' but you
    > might get away with standard pliers or improvise by twisting a
    > loop of strong wire as a 'spanish windlass' - but be careful!
    > Those springs can be powerful.
    >
    > You might find this helpful
    > <http://images.google.com/images?gbv=1&svnum=10&um=1&hl=en&clie
    > nt=opera&rls =en&q=hose+clamp&btnG=Search+Images> or
    > <http://shortlinks.co.uk/3k1>. The screw-driver operated type
    > is usually called 'jubilee clip' here in the UK.
    >

    Sorry for coming into this late, but I just noticed it. Old
    fashioned large hose clamps that used a standard pair of pliers
    with a slot cut into the jaws won't work on a modern one-time use
    clamp. I would urge the OP to buy or borrow the SPECIFIC plier(s)
    needed for the SPECIFIC clamp(s), as they may well be different
    in size or clamping force. Also, depending on what is being
    unclamped, precautions will likely need to be taken to prevent
    potentially harmful liquids from going all over the floor of the
    garage or other place. No, there's no toxic waste and nothing
    super dangerous, but I would strongly suspect it ain't healthy
    drinking that stuff. Also be SURE to guard your eyes with at
    least wrap-around shop glasses if not goggles, because some
    automotive fluids are very caustic to the eyes, and there may be
    some pressure remaining when you pop the clamp and the hose.

    I agree these clamps are powerful, I would personally NOT try to
    jury rig something. Standard pliers are most likely going to slip
    or partially mangle the clamp making it impossible to drive the
    car, or the OP may hurt themselves. I've never used a "spanish
    windlass", but in my younger days, I did work on my own cars
    after being taught car repair from my father as a youth. He NEVER
    fooled around with makeshift tools, but he was blue-collar and
    hardly affluent enough to buy the specialized tools necessary,
    but as the Beatles song went, "with a little help from my
    friends", he could always borrow what he needed from friends or
    co-workers from the car plant that had more extensive tool
    chests.

    Again, my apologies if all this has already been covered in
    earlier replies, as I said, I just noticed it now.

    --
    HP, aka Jerry
    HEMI-Powered, Aug 15, 2007
    #9
  10. Whiskers Guest

    On 2007-08-15, HEMI-Powered <> wrote:
    > Whiskers added these comments in the current discussion du jour
    > ...
    >
    >>> Anybody know what these clamps are called? I've got them on
    >>> the fuel, Power Steering, and transmission cooling lines.
    >>>
    >>> http://www.shakyparts.com/cgi-bin/image/templates/5905lit.jpg
    >>> or
    >>> http://us1.webpublications.com.au/static/images/articles/i26/2
    >>> 692_9lo.j pg
    >>>
    >>> I've seen "Fuel line clamps", "T-clamps", "spring clamps"...
    >>>
    >>> But I need a tool to spread/open them and those descriptions
    >>> aren't working.

    >>
    >> There are special tools known as 'hose clamp pliers' but you
    >> might get away with standard pliers or improvise by twisting a
    >> loop of strong wire as a 'spanish windlass' - but be careful!
    >> Those springs can be powerful.
    >>
    >> You might find this helpful
    >> <http://images.google.com/images?gbv=1&svnum=10&um=1&hl=en&clie
    >> nt=opera&rls =en&q=hose+clamp&btnG=Search+Images> or
    >> <http://shortlinks.co.uk/3k1>. The screw-driver operated type
    >> is usually called 'jubilee clip' here in the UK.
    >>

    > Sorry for coming into this late, but I just noticed it. Old
    > fashioned large hose clamps that used a standard pair of pliers
    > with a slot cut into the jaws won't work on a modern one-time use
    > clamp. I would urge the OP to buy or borrow the SPECIFIC plier(s)
    > needed for the SPECIFIC clamp(s), as they may well be different
    > in size or clamping force.


    The hose clamp pliers I've seen use a Bowden cable with fittings on the
    sleeve and inner to hold the tags on the hose clamp, and the pliers are at
    the other end of the Bowden cable and use a ratchet to pull the inner
    through thus opening the clamp and holding it. I believe you can get sets
    of varying size and power.

    > Also, depending on what is being
    > unclamped, precautions will likely need to be taken to prevent
    > potentially harmful liquids from going all over the floor of the
    > garage or other place. No, there's no toxic waste and nothing
    > super dangerous, but I would strongly suspect it ain't healthy
    > drinking that stuff. Also be SURE to guard your eyes with at
    > least wrap-around shop glasses if not goggles, because some
    > automotive fluids are very caustic to the eyes, and there may be
    > some pressure remaining when you pop the clamp and the hose.


    Good advice.

    > I agree these clamps are powerful, I would personally NOT try to
    > jury rig something. Standard pliers are most likely going to slip
    > or partially mangle the clamp making it impossible to drive the
    > car, or the OP may hurt themselves. I've never used a "spanish
    > windlass", but in my younger days, I did work on my own cars
    > after being taught car repair from my father as a youth. He NEVER
    > fooled around with makeshift tools, but he was blue-collar and
    > hardly affluent enough to buy the specialized tools necessary,
    > but as the Beatles song went, "with a little help from my
    > friends", he could always borrow what he needed from friends or
    > co-workers from the car plant that had more extensive tool
    > chests.


    I certainly wouldn't recommend improvising on a large hose clamp or a
    system that is possibly under pressure - if in any doubt, I get a
    professional to do it! - but sometimes there is no viable option. The
    image linked to by the OP is of a small clamp less than 1" across by the
    looks of it.

    > Again, my apologies if all this has already been covered in
    > earlier replies, as I said, I just noticed it now.


    A worthwhile contribution, in my opinion.

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
    Whiskers, Aug 15, 2007
    #10
  11. wrote in news:qqm4c31i8v7eflao12mdhnr8pnnn34opho@
    4ax.com:

    >
    > Anybody know what these clamps are called? I've got them on the fuel,
    > Power Steering, and transmission cooling lines.
    >
    > http://www.shakyparts.com/cgi-bin/image/templates/5905lit.jpg
    > or
    > http://us1.webpublications.com.au/static/images/articles/i26/2692_9lo.jpg
    >
    > I've seen "Fuel line clamps", "T-clamps", "spring clamps"...
    >
    > But I need a tool to spread/open them and those descriptions aren't
    > working.



    They're just spring hose clamps. While there are specialized tools for their
    application (like slotted pliers) Channel-Lok or slip-joint pliers work well,
    as do needle-nose or Kline lineman's, etc. Usually they are applied in tight
    places, and a bent-prong needle nose work well in that case.

    http://www.eclipsetools.com/ProductPics/Latest .jpegs/100-004.JPG

    --

    "Unless it's an emergency, don't bother me after
    6:00 PM and on weekends." -- Merv Griffin (1925-2007)

    (O
    |__ BECAUSE OF THE RETARDS NORMAL PEOPLE
    .-|___ CAN NEVER PARK BY THE FRONT AGAIN
    ( ) \_
    `--'
    Bucky Breeder, Aug 15, 2007
    #11
  12. Alfred Guest

    On Tue, 14 Aug 2007 18:55:30 -0700, wrote:

    >
    >Anybody know what these clamps are called? I've got them on the fuel,
    >Power Steering, and transmission cooling lines.
    >
    >http://www.shakyparts.com/cgi-bin/image/templates/5905lit.jpg
    >or
    >http://us1.webpublications.com.au/static/images/articles/i26/2692_9lo.jpg
    >
    >I've seen "Fuel line clamps", "T-clamps", "spring clamps"...
    >
    >But I need a tool to spread/open them and those descriptions aren't
    >working.


    I always just use a big pair of pliers
    http://www.qsradio.com/Slip-Joint Pliers.JPG
    Alfred, Aug 15, 2007
    #12
  13. HEMI-Powered Guest

    Whiskers added these comments in the current discussion du jour
    ....

    >>>> Anybody know what these clamps are called? I've got them on
    >>>> the fuel, Power Steering, and transmission cooling lines.


    >> Sorry for coming into this late, but I just noticed it. Old
    >> fashioned large hose clamps that used a standard pair of
    >> pliers with a slot cut into the jaws won't work on a modern
    >> one-time use clamp. I would urge the OP to buy or borrow the
    >> SPECIFIC plier(s) needed for the SPECIFIC clamp(s), as they
    >> may well be different in size or clamping force.

    >
    > The hose clamp pliers I've seen use a Bowden cable with
    > fittings on the sleeve and inner to hold the tags on the hose
    > clamp, and the pliers are at the other end of the Bowden cable
    > and use a ratchet to pull the inner through thus opening the
    > clamp and holding it. I believe you can get sets of varying
    > size and power.


    I DO know what that is. It has been awhile since I did any
    backyard mechanic work. I'm older and wiser and do not want to
    buy the specialized tools necessary today, and prefer NOT to
    wreck something through ignorance that is expensive to fix. But,
    again, depending on WHAT clamp types there are and the nature of
    the hose, if I had my druthers, I try to borrow the right pliers
    and be safe both personally and for the car.

    >> Also, depending on what is being
    >> unclamped, precautions will likely need to be taken to
    >> prevent potentially harmful liquids from going all over the
    >> floor of the garage or other place. No, there's no toxic
    >> waste and nothing super dangerous, but I would strongly
    >> suspect it ain't healthy drinking that stuff. Also be SURE to
    >> guard your eyes with at least wrap-around shop glasses if not
    >> goggles, because some automotive fluids are very caustic to
    >> the eyes, and there may be some pressure remaining when you
    >> pop the clamp and the hose.

    >
    > Good advice.


    A friend I know has a muscle car that he was putting synthetic
    oil in. Something went wrong while he was under the car just
    taking the drain plug out and got the stuff in both eyes. He was
    in instant excrutiating pain and also blinded! Really nasty. His
    wife had to rush him to the hospital, of course, and from what I
    remember, what they did to him wasn't espcially fun. Again,
    modern fluids must meet stringent environmental requirements for
    lack of both toxicity and lack of damage to the environment,
    e.g., groundwater, in the event of even a small spill. Still,
    even ordinary brake fluid or automatic tranny fluid in the eyes
    isn't a good idea, nor really anywhere on your face, especially
    in your nose or mouth.

    >> I agree these clamps are powerful, I would personally NOT try
    >> to jury rig something. Standard pliers are most likely going
    >> to slip or partially mangle the clamp making it impossible to
    >> drive the car, or the OP may hurt themselves. I've never used
    >> a "spanish windlass", but in my younger days, I did work on
    >> my own cars after being taught car repair from my father as a
    >> youth. He NEVER fooled around with makeshift tools, but he
    >> was blue-collar and hardly affluent enough to buy the
    >> specialized tools necessary, but as the Beatles song went,
    >> "with a little help from my friends", he could always borrow
    >> what he needed from friends or co-workers from the car plant
    >> that had more extensive tool chests.

    >
    > I certainly wouldn't recommend improvising on a large hose
    > clamp or a system that is possibly under pressure - if in any
    > doubt, I get a professional to do it! - but sometimes there is
    > no viable option. The image linked to by the OP is of a small
    > clamp less than 1" across by the looks of it.


    As I said, I came into this very late, so I don't know even what
    kind of car the OP has or what year it is. If it is modern,
    again, I would err on the side of caution and do what you said -
    pay a pro to do it. Better for you, and far better for the car.
    But, if it is a vintage car of some sort, e.g. a muscle car or
    even a 1980s/90s car, it may be difficult to find people to do
    certain kinds of work.

    >> Again, my apologies if all this has already been covered in
    >> earlier replies, as I said, I just noticed it now.

    >
    > A worthwhile contribution, in my opinion.
    >

    Thank you. Besides my father's outstanding teaching of auto
    mechanics and things like woodworking and home repair, I know
    many of these things from my 33 years at Chrysler. No, I didn't
    personally do any of it, but I knew people at all levels that
    did.

    For all of my career after early 1975 to when I retired in
    January, 2002, I was in some sort of CAD/CAM/PC support as an
    engineer, supervisor, manager, etc. The last 5 1/2 years I was in
    this frustratingly difficult job of Engineering Information
    Security Manager. So, I was fortunate to come in contact with the
    product men and women from lowly mechanics and technicians to
    lofty executives. That was perhaps the most fun part of my job,
    that of learning from these people what the car biz is all about,
    even if I wasn't personally contributing.

    --
    HP, aka Jerry
    HEMI-Powered, Aug 15, 2007
    #13
  14. HEMI-Powered Guest

    Bucky Breeder added these comments in the current discussion du
    jour ...

    >> Anybody know what these clamps are called? I've got them on
    >> the fuel, Power Steering, and transmission cooling lines.
    >>
    >> http://www.shakyparts.com/cgi-bin/image/templates/5905lit.jpg
    >> or
    >> http://us1.webpublications.com.au/static/images/articles/i26/2
    >> 692_9lo.j pg
    >>
    >> I've seen "Fuel line clamps", "T-clamps", "spring clamps"...
    >>
    >> But I need a tool to spread/open them and those descriptions
    >> aren't working.

    >
    > They're just spring hose clamps. While there are specialized
    > tools for their application (like slotted pliers) Channel-Lok
    > or slip-joint pliers work well, as do needle-nose or Kline
    > lineman's, etc. Usually they are applied in tight places, and
    > a bent-prong needle nose work well in that case.
    >
    > http://www.eclipsetools.com/ProductPics/Latest .jpegs/100-004
    > .JPG
    >

    OK. Just curious, but besides the obvious - saving money - why do
    you or anybody want to get involved in this stuff, especially in
    working on anything in tight places?

    I have a 2007 Dodge Charger HEMI R/T and previously had an early
    build 2006 of the same car. The HEMI is so large with all its
    accessories that even in a pretty big engine compartment, there
    just ain't no place for the battery, so they cabled that and its
    main fuse block into the spare time well, ala what the drag race
    guys did. Although here, it isn't for weight transfer, it is just
    sheet lack of space. I can tell you that virtually the entire
    engine except a few glimses of these hoses you're talking about,
    the ABS system, and the like, are completely covered up by a
    gigantic combination air cleaner/engine cover. It has ducting to
    the actual cleaner, but the huge cover itself has no visible
    fasteners. I have no clue how to even get it off, but then, I
    don't have the service manual. On a MSRP $36K car of this
    complexity, and the huge danger of doing warrenty-cancelling
    damage, if I had a problem, I'd go to the dealer.

    --
    HP, aka Jerry
    HEMI-Powered, Aug 15, 2007
    #14
  15. "HEMI-Powered" <> wrote in
    news:Xns998D6FB6B63F1ReplyScoreID@216.168.3.30:

    > Bucky Breeder added these comments in the current discussion du
    > jour ...
    >
    >>> Anybody know what these clamps are called? I've got them on
    >>> the fuel, Power Steering, and transmission cooling lines.
    >>>
    >>> http://www.shakyparts.com/cgi-bin/image/templates/5905lit.jpg
    >>> or
    >>> http://us1.webpublications.com.au/static/images/articles/i26/2
    >>> 692_9lo.j pg
    >>>
    >>> I've seen "Fuel line clamps", "T-clamps", "spring clamps"...
    >>>
    >>> But I need a tool to spread/open them and those descriptions
    >>> aren't working.

    >>
    >> They're just spring hose clamps. While there are specialized
    >> tools for their application (like slotted pliers) Channel-Lok
    >> or slip-joint pliers work well, as do needle-nose or Kline
    >> lineman's, etc. Usually they are applied in tight places, and
    >> a bent-prong needle nose work well in that case.
    >>
    >> http://www.eclipsetools.com/ProductPics/Latest .jpegs/100-004
    >> .JPG
    >>

    > OK. Just curious, but besides the obvious - saving money - why do
    > you or anybody want to get involved in this stuff, especially in
    > working on anything in tight places?


    The saying goes "The war was lost for lack of a nail." Then the basic
    scenario Rube-Goldbergs into how the bridge collapsed when the troops were
    trying to cross... lost the battle... costing loss of the war.

    Plus, as a kid, I was quite the MacGyver fan!

    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0088559/


    > I have a 2007 Dodge Charger HEMI R/T and previously had an early
    > build 2006 of the same car. The HEMI is so large with all its
    > accessories that even in a pretty big engine compartment, there
    > just ain't no place for the battery, so they cabled that and its
    > main fuse block into the spare time well, ala what the drag race
    > guys did. Although here, it isn't for weight transfer, it is just
    > sheet lack of space. I can tell you that virtually the entire
    > engine except a few glimses of these hoses you're talking about,
    > the ABS system, and the like, are completely covered up by a
    > gigantic combination air cleaner/engine cover. It has ducting to
    > the actual cleaner, but the huge cover itself has no visible
    > fasteners. I have no clue how to even get it off, but then, I
    > don't have the service manual. On a MSRP $36K car of this
    > complexity, and the huge danger of doing warrenty-cancelling
    > damage, if I had a problem, I'd go to the dealer.



    I had an old 1981 4WD Blazer Silverado that I completely re-fitted using a
    protocol based on a DoD Maintenance Management System... Any part close to
    failing upon examination got replaced with the *best* available all the way
    back to its system or source, and when replacing anything whatsoever, if I
    could get the part/case/cover chromed, that's what I did. I replaced all
    my spring clamps with chromed hose clamps when I could, but some of the
    spring clamps are actually quite efficient once you get used to them, and
    you can get those chromed too. That thing was very dependent on a vacuum
    sytem for carburation advance and cruise control, etc., and the hoses would
    get brittle thus what may seem like a very complex problem was often solved
    by replacing a brittle hose with a pliable new one. Hidden splits and such
    were very common, it seems.

    That poor overworked piece of garbage would give me six [ that is an
    absolute (*_6_*)!!! ] MPG no matter what I was doing; 2WD, 4WD, pulling a
    boat, driving in the mountains, cruising cross-country on the Interstates,
    in South Florida, Montana, Cascades, Blue Ridge, High Desert, Low Desert, I
    don't care what I did, I got a smooth dependable 4-MPG... The guy I sold
    it to still has it and loves it to death! Lucky for both of us.

    On your air-cover cowling, next time you go to your dealer, they'll likely
    be happy to demonstrate the procedure for snapping that apart -- for
    several reasons, not the least of which may be that interim inspections by
    the owner/operator could prove to be quite prudent especially in
    particularly hostile driving conditions such as desert or arctic climates
    or even construction sites, or off-road exploring. I like keeping my
    filters really clean. In the long run it's way-cheap compared to the
    potential damages and/or the increased gas milage costs.

    In my view, there's certainly nothing wrong with accessing the experts at
    the dealers because they are intricately trained in their field(s) and
    practice their trades so much that they'd likely catch a pending problem
    long before a normal user would even notice anything amiss. But, it's good
    to know your way around at least the superficial systems in case you're
    stranded and can't get any signal bars on your cell-phone. Just one EMP
    away, and then it's only me, my trusty old SwissTool and some chewing gum.
    (^;

    --

    "Unless it's an emergency, don't bother me after
    6:00 PM and on weekends." -- Merv Griffin (1925-2007)

    (O
    |__ BECAUSE OF THE RETARDS NORMAL PEOPLE
    .-|___ CAN NEVER PARK BY THE FRONT AGAIN
    ( ) \_
    `--'
    Bucky Breeder, Aug 15, 2007
    #15
  16. Vanguard Guest

    "HEMI-Powered" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns998D6FB6B63F1ReplyScoreID@216.168.3.30...
    > On a MSRP $36K car of this
    > complexity, and the huge danger of doing warrenty-cancelling
    > damage, if I had a problem, I'd go to the dealer.



    Subie owners tend to keep their cars long past the expiration of the
    warranty. $80 to remove a hose clamp would be a ridiculous waste of
    money.
    Vanguard, Aug 15, 2007
    #16
  17. Alfred Guest

    On Wed, 15 Aug 2007 11:48:55 -0700, "WhzzKdd"
    <frack_this@email_is.invalid> wrote:

    >"Alfred" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> On Tue, 14 Aug 2007 18:55:30 -0700, wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>>Anybody know what these clamps are called? I've got them on the fuel,
    >>>Power Steering, and transmission cooling lines.
    >>>
    >>>http://www.shakyparts.com/cgi-bin/image/templates/5905lit.jpg
    >>>or
    >>>http://us1.webpublications.com.au/static/images/articles/i26/2692_9lo.jpg
    >>>
    >>>I've seen "Fuel line clamps", "T-clamps", "spring clamps"...
    >>>
    >>>But I need a tool to spread/open them and those descriptions aren't
    >>>working.

    >>
    >> I always just use a big pair of pliers
    >> http://www.qsradio.com/Slip-Joint Pliers.JPG

    >
    >
    >Obviously, a number of readers failed to understand that the OP needs to
    >spread the clamp FARTHER than a pair of pliers will handle. The middle tab
    >needs to come out beyond the two side tabs.


    Why?
    I've only ever seen these clamps on washing machines and air ducting.
    A pair of pliers to take up the tension and pull the hose off did it
    for me every time.

    For cars It has always been these
    http://www.swelluk.com/img/shop/original/Pond-Pipework-Fittings-Double-Wire-Hose-Clips.jpg

    or these
    http://www.aer.co.uk/acatalog/hose_clip.JPG

    > Just try that with slip-joint
    >pliers <g>
    >
    Alfred, Aug 15, 2007
    #17
  18. WhzzKdd Guest

    "HEMI-Powered" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns998D6EDFDE03DReplyScoreID@216.168.3.30...
    >
    > A friend I know has a muscle car that he was putting synthetic
    > oil in. Something went wrong while he was under the car just
    > taking the drain plug out and got the stuff in both eyes. He was
    > in instant excrutiating pain and also blinded! Really nasty. His
    > wife had to rush him to the hospital, of course, and from what I
    > remember, what they did to him wasn't espcially fun.
    >

    Back when I was working in the factory (I'm in the office now, customer
    service for the same company), I had a machine puncture an aerosol can of
    penetrating oil (similar to WD40), spraying it directly into my face -
    mouth, nose and eyes. I was taken to the hospital where they ran a drip
    saline solution into both eyes - 30 minutes of them holding the eyes open
    while I watched that saltwater drip...drip...drip...drip...

    The same machine (hydraulically actuated) at a different time caught my
    finger and crushed the tip to about 1/4" thick. Somehow I got through that
    with no broken bones, but it hurt like a MF for a few days <g>

    Actually, after 12 years in the plant, having only those two incidents (and
    a sprained ankle from stepping sideways on a misplaced discarded piece of
    2x4) were the only real accidents I had. So many people I work with have
    fingers (or parts thereof) totally missing...I got off easy.

    Boy, am I glad I work in the office now :)
    WhzzKdd, Aug 15, 2007
    #18
  19. WhzzKdd Guest

    "Alfred" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Tue, 14 Aug 2007 18:55:30 -0700, wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>Anybody know what these clamps are called? I've got them on the fuel,
    >>Power Steering, and transmission cooling lines.
    >>
    >>http://www.shakyparts.com/cgi-bin/image/templates/5905lit.jpg
    >>or
    >>http://us1.webpublications.com.au/static/images/articles/i26/2692_9lo.jpg
    >>
    >>I've seen "Fuel line clamps", "T-clamps", "spring clamps"...
    >>
    >>But I need a tool to spread/open them and those descriptions aren't
    >>working.

    >
    > I always just use a big pair of pliers
    > http://www.qsradio.com/Slip-Joint Pliers.JPG



    Obviously, a number of readers failed to understand that the OP needs to
    spread the clamp FARTHER than a pair of pliers will handle. The middle tab
    needs to come out beyond the two side tabs. Just try that with slip-joint
    pliers <g>
    WhzzKdd, Aug 15, 2007
    #19
  20. Guest

    "HEMI-Powered" <> wrote:

    >As I said, I came into this very late, so I don't know even what
    >kind of car the OP has or what year it is. If it is modern,
    >again, I would err on the side of caution and do what you said -
    >pay a pro to do it. Better for you, and far better for the car.
    >But, if it is a vintage car of some sort, e.g. a muscle car or
    >even a 1980s/90s car, it may be difficult to find people to do
    >certain kinds of work.


    Thank you for your replies, and fluid warnings.

    The auto in question is a 94 Mazda MPV 4WD, and I'm attempting to
    replace the starter.

    I have always taken it to the dealer as this auto is just too
    difficult to work on and I don't have the shop manuals for it (Library
    does, and I'm purchasing it for 15 cents a page <G> )

    I had the starter replaced once before $600 (4 years ago) and the
    water pump a few months ago $400. and I need 4 new tires like right
    now.

    Figure'd screw it I've always done my own work
    I'm a VW mechanic :) transportation at this time (not my link):
    http://www.classiccarmall.com/carsfs/sale2153.htm

    This turned out to be a bigger deal than I expected and $600 would of
    been a deal - had to remove everything on the left hand side just to
    see the starter; then drop a drive line to get to the bolts.

    Then clamps were for the power steering and might be for the
    transmission fluid to and from the radiator - High pressure side of
    the steering box has a aviation type connector (didn't notice until
    today when I removed it).

    All fittings are low pressure but I wanted to reuse the clamps, guess
    I'll stick with bailing wire :) na, I'll just use the screw type
    clamps but they can bind the hose and allow fluid to leak, I'll just
    be careful.


    --
    Over 1,700 Arcade Manuals in PDF Format!
    http://ascii.textfiles.com/archives/000454.html
    , Aug 15, 2007
    #20
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