Weird ROES issue

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Pat, Aug 14, 2006.

  1. Pat

    Pat Guest

    In my ROES software, a picture shot in portrait orientation and flipped
    to that orientation looks okay in the preview window, but when I move
    it to the editing window, it become a negative. Then, in the Review
    page, it also is a negative. But it prints okay.

    For un-rotated pictures, it doesn't do that.

    Isn't really a problem except it's hard to edit when the image is a
    negative. Unrotating the image solves the problem, but then I'm
    editing the image sideways.

    Does anyone else have that problem and have any idea how to fix it?

    Thanks.

    Pat.
     
    Pat, Aug 14, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Pat

    Helen Guest

    "Pat" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In my ROES software, a picture shot in portrait orientation and flipped
    > to that orientation looks okay in the preview window, but when I move
    > it to the editing window, it become a negative. Then, in the Review
    > page, it also is a negative. But it prints okay.
    >


    I thought ROES were fish eggs.
    However, notwithstanding my ignorance, it would be helpful to be advised of
    the camera and the software, don't you think?
     
    Helen, Aug 14, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Pat

    Pat Guest

    ROES is the software.

    The problem is some sort of software/install/JAVA/interface/video
    problem. Only does it on 1 machine. Software has been reinstalled and
    updated, to no avail.

    Just plain weird.


    Helen wrote:
    > "Pat" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > In my ROES software, a picture shot in portrait orientation and flipped
    > > to that orientation looks okay in the preview window, but when I move
    > > it to the editing window, it become a negative. Then, in the Review
    > > page, it also is a negative. But it prints okay.
    > >

    >
    > I thought ROES were fish eggs.
    > However, notwithstanding my ignorance, it would be helpful to be advised of
    > the camera and the software, don't you think?
     
    Pat, Aug 14, 2006
    #3
  4. Pat

    Bill Funk Guest

    On 14 Aug 2006 11:50:39 -0700, "Pat" <>
    wrote:

    >ROES is the software.


    Is ROES Remote Order Entry System?
    If not, is there some other name the software might have that would be
    more recognizable?
    What does ROES do?
    >
    >The problem is some sort of software/install/JAVA/interface/video
    >problem. Only does it on 1 machine. Software has been reinstalled and
    >updated, to no avail.
    >
    >Just plain weird.
    >
    >
    >Helen wrote:
    >> "Pat" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >> > In my ROES software, a picture shot in portrait orientation and flipped
    >> > to that orientation looks okay in the preview window, but when I move
    >> > it to the editing window, it become a negative. Then, in the Review
    >> > page, it also is a negative. But it prints okay.
    >> >

    >>
    >> I thought ROES were fish eggs.
    >> However, notwithstanding my ignorance, it would be helpful to be advised of
    >> the camera and the software, don't you think?

    --
    Bill Funk
    replace "g" with "a"
     
    Bill Funk, Aug 15, 2006
    #4
  5. Pat

    Roy G Guest

    "Pat" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In my ROES software, a picture shot in portrait
    >>>>>>>>>

    > Thanks.
    >
    > Pat.
    >

    Hi

    I am very glad to discover that I am not the only person who has never heard
    of ROES software, and can't even begin to figure out what it means.

    Roy G
     
    Roy G, Aug 15, 2006
    #5
  6. Pat

    Pat Guest

    To all: Thanks. Sorry, but I thought it was a little more common than
    it seems to be.

    ROES is a little Java based application that you install on your
    computer. It is sort of a shell program that printers customize for
    their own lab. They put in their pricing, file sizes, template for
    albums, etc. In ROES, you bring up your pictures and make whatever
    basic adjustments you want: cropping and rotation. It then saves the
    picture info in a small file. When you are done, you send it off to
    your printer either as a huge upload (including the digital files) or
    save it to a CD/DVD. When I'm uploading, I usually wait until the end
    of the day, tell it to upload, and leave because it takes hours and
    hours to upload a bunch of pictures.

    I guess you could think of it as a PC based interface for a digital
    lab, instead of a web-based interface.

    It really isn't designed for sending a picture or two. More for doing
    a lot of pictures. I usually upload between 50 and 100 pics at a time
    because it is a manageable amount. 100 pic is usually a 2.5 to 3 hour
    upload on DSL.

    What do you-all use if you don't use ROES? It's pretty common (okay,
    at least not "uncommon") for Kodak labs.



    Pat wrote:
    > In my ROES software, a picture shot in portrait orientation and flipped
    > to that orientation looks okay in the preview window, but when I move
    > it to the editing window, it become a negative. Then, in the Review
    > page, it also is a negative. But it prints okay.
    >
    > For un-rotated pictures, it doesn't do that.
    >
    > Isn't really a problem except it's hard to edit when the image is a
    > negative. Unrotating the image solves the problem, but then I'm
    > editing the image sideways.
    >
    > Does anyone else have that problem and have any idea how to fix it?
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > Pat.
     
    Pat, Aug 15, 2006
    #6
  7. In article <>, Pat
    <> wrote:

    > ROES is a little Java based application that you install on your
    > computer. It is sort of a shell program that printers customize for
    > their own lab. They put in their pricing, file sizes, template for
    > albums, etc. In ROES, you bring up your pictures and make whatever
    > basic adjustments you want: cropping and rotation. It then saves the
    > picture info in a small file. When you are done, you send it off to
    > your printer either as a huge upload (including the digital files) or
    > save it to a CD/DVD. When I'm uploading, I usually wait until the end
    > of the day, tell it to upload, and leave because it takes hours and
    > hours to upload a bunch of pictures.
    >
    > I guess you could think of it as a PC based interface for a digital
    > lab, instead of a web-based interface.
    >
    > It really isn't designed for sending a picture or two. More for doing
    > a lot of pictures. I usually upload between 50 and 100 pics at a time
    > because it is a manageable amount. 100 pic is usually a 2.5 to 3 hour
    > upload on DSL.
    >
    > What do you-all use if you don't use ROES? It's pretty common (okay,
    > at least not "uncommon") for Kodak labs.


    My lab uses ROES. It works great on both PCs and Macs. I used to have a
    problem on the Mac side, where certain images would look OK in the
    preview, but be very green in the ROES working window. I think they've
    got that worked out now. I haven't sent anything to the lab in way too
    long.

    But, it's a convenient way to order prints. My monitor is calibrated
    with the lab's way of printing just about as close as you can get.
    Generally, I do very little cropping - having learned long ago to crop
    in the camera.
     
    Randall Ainsworth, Aug 15, 2006
    #7
  8. Pat

    Pat Guest

    Randall Ainsworth wrote:
    > In article <>, Pat
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > > ROES is a little Java based application that you install on your
    > > computer. It is sort of a shell program that printers customize for
    > > their own lab. They put in their pricing, file sizes, template for
    > > albums, etc. In ROES, you bring up your pictures and make whatever
    > > basic adjustments you want: cropping and rotation. It then saves the
    > > picture info in a small file. When you are done, you send it off to
    > > your printer either as a huge upload (including the digital files) or
    > > save it to a CD/DVD. When I'm uploading, I usually wait until the end
    > > of the day, tell it to upload, and leave because it takes hours and
    > > hours to upload a bunch of pictures.
    > >
    > > I guess you could think of it as a PC based interface for a digital
    > > lab, instead of a web-based interface.
    > >
    > > It really isn't designed for sending a picture or two. More for doing
    > > a lot of pictures. I usually upload between 50 and 100 pics at a time
    > > because it is a manageable amount. 100 pic is usually a 2.5 to 3 hour
    > > upload on DSL.
    > >
    > > What do you-all use if you don't use ROES? It's pretty common (okay,
    > > at least not "uncommon") for Kodak labs.

    >
    > My lab uses ROES. It works great on both PCs and Macs. I used to have a
    > problem on the Mac side, where certain images would look OK in the
    > preview, but be very green in the ROES working window. I think they've
    > got that worked out now. I haven't sent anything to the lab in way too
    > long.

    I just have the problem on 1 computer, too. I think it must have
    something to do with JAVA and the graphics card.
    >
    > But, it's a convenient way to order prints. My monitor is calibrated
    > with the lab's way of printing just about as close as you can get.
    > Generally, I do very little cropping - having learned long ago to crop
    > in the camera.


    Agreed. I do very little cropping. Mostly just to get the format,
    such as aligning the crop for an 8x10 because of the different aspect.
    I shot with my "wedding bracket" on and by the end of the day I must
    have been getting tired. I had to rotate some of the about 1 degree.
     
    Pat, Aug 15, 2006
    #8
  9. Pat

    Roy G Guest

    "Pat" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > Randall Ainsworth wrote:
    >> In article <>, Pat
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >> > ROES is a little Java based application that you install on your
    >> > computer. It is sort of a shell program that printers customize for
    >> > their own lab. They put in their pricing, file sizes, template for
    >> > albums, etc. In ROES, you bring up your pictures and make whatever
    >> > basic adjustments you want: cropping and rotation. It then saves the
    >> > picture info in a small file. When you are done, you send it off to
    >> > your printer either as a huge upload (including the digital files) or
    >> > save it to a CD/DVD. When I'm uploading, I usually wait until the end
    >> > of the day, tell it to upload, and leave because it takes hours and
    >> > hours to upload a bunch of pictures.
    >> >
    >> > I guess you could think of it as a PC based interface for a digital
    >> > lab, instead of a web-based interface.
    >> >
    >> > It really isn't designed for sending a picture or two. More for doing
    >> > a lot of pictures. I usually upload between 50 and 100 pics at a time
    >> > because it is a manageable amount. 100 pic is usually a 2.5 to 3 hour
    >> > upload on DSL.
    >> >
    >> > What do you-all use if you don't use ROES? It's pretty common (okay,
    >> > at least not "uncommon") for Kodak labs.

    >>
    >> My lab uses ROES. It works great on both PCs and Macs. I used to have a
    >> problem on the Mac side, where certain images would look OK in the
    >> preview, but be very green in the ROES working window. I think they've
    >> got that worked out now. I haven't sent anything to the lab in way too
    >> long.

    > I just have the problem on 1 computer, too. I think it must have
    > something to do with JAVA and the graphics card.
    >>
    >> But, it's a convenient way to order prints. My monitor is calibrated
    >> with the lab's way of printing just about as close as you can get.
    >> Generally, I do very little cropping - having learned long ago to crop
    >> in the camera.

    >
    > Agreed. I do very little cropping. Mostly just to get the format,
    > such as aligning the crop for an 8x10 because of the different aspect.
    > I shot with my "wedding bracket" on and by the end of the day I must
    > have been getting tired. I had to rotate some of the about 1 degree.
    >


    Hi.

    Now we know. There is something new every day on this group.

    With this sort of specialised program, I would have thought your Pro Lab
    would have been the people to ask.

    You use it once a day, but they must use it hundreds of times every day, and
    have seen every kind of problem, and probably know all the answers.

    Roy G
     
    Roy G, Aug 15, 2006
    #9
  10. Pat

    Pat Guest

    No, tried that. They had no idea, but they are a photo lab, not
    computer geeks.

    Generally, it's a pretty stable little application.

    Oh, well, I guess I'll work with negatives ....



    Roy G wrote:
    > "Pat" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > >
    > > Randall Ainsworth wrote:
    > >> In article <>, Pat
    > >> <> wrote:
    > >>
    > >> > ROES is a little Java based application that you install on your
    > >> > computer. It is sort of a shell program that printers customize for
    > >> > their own lab. They put in their pricing, file sizes, template for
    > >> > albums, etc. In ROES, you bring up your pictures and make whatever
    > >> > basic adjustments you want: cropping and rotation. It then saves the
    > >> > picture info in a small file. When you are done, you send it off to
    > >> > your printer either as a huge upload (including the digital files) or
    > >> > save it to a CD/DVD. When I'm uploading, I usually wait until the end
    > >> > of the day, tell it to upload, and leave because it takes hours and
    > >> > hours to upload a bunch of pictures.
    > >> >
    > >> > I guess you could think of it as a PC based interface for a digital
    > >> > lab, instead of a web-based interface.
    > >> >
    > >> > It really isn't designed for sending a picture or two. More for doing
    > >> > a lot of pictures. I usually upload between 50 and 100 pics at a time
    > >> > because it is a manageable amount. 100 pic is usually a 2.5 to 3 hour
    > >> > upload on DSL.
    > >> >
    > >> > What do you-all use if you don't use ROES? It's pretty common (okay,
    > >> > at least not "uncommon") for Kodak labs.
    > >>
    > >> My lab uses ROES. It works great on both PCs and Macs. I used to have a
    > >> problem on the Mac side, where certain images would look OK in the
    > >> preview, but be very green in the ROES working window. I think they've
    > >> got that worked out now. I haven't sent anything to the lab in way too
    > >> long.

    > > I just have the problem on 1 computer, too. I think it must have
    > > something to do with JAVA and the graphics card.
    > >>
    > >> But, it's a convenient way to order prints. My monitor is calibrated
    > >> with the lab's way of printing just about as close as you can get.
    > >> Generally, I do very little cropping - having learned long ago to crop
    > >> in the camera.

    > >
    > > Agreed. I do very little cropping. Mostly just to get the format,
    > > such as aligning the crop for an 8x10 because of the different aspect.
    > > I shot with my "wedding bracket" on and by the end of the day I must
    > > have been getting tired. I had to rotate some of the about 1 degree.
    > >

    >
    > Hi.
    >
    > Now we know. There is something new every day on this group.
    >
    > With this sort of specialised program, I would have thought your Pro Lab
    > would have been the people to ask.
    >
    > You use it once a day, but they must use it hundreds of times every day, and
    > have seen every kind of problem, and probably know all the answers.
    >
    > Roy G
     
    Pat, Aug 15, 2006
    #10
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Ethan

    Weird issue with new wireless NIC.

    Ethan, Oct 24, 2004, in forum: Wireless Networking
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    686
    Ethan
    Oct 24, 2004
  2. Jeff
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    662
  3. Al Blake

    Weird AP-350 issue

    Al Blake, Apr 15, 2004, in forum: Cisco
    Replies:
    6
    Views:
    2,962
  4. Michael Williams

    weird issue with Pix 501

    Michael Williams, Oct 23, 2004, in forum: Cisco
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    762
  5. Jonathan Haase

    Weird NAT/Routing Issue.

    Jonathan Haase, May 2, 2006, in forum: Cisco
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    4,133
    sharman
    May 19, 2007
Loading...

Share This Page