week in review :)

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Shane, Jun 5, 2005.

  1. Shane

    Shane Guest

    what a crap week..
    met a guy that thinks he knows _everything_
    but doesnt know what last does, what the -al switches on ls do... or whats
    held in wtmp.log.. but lectures me on how Im probably running an open
    relay for mail (not)
    when I ask him about a perl script... his answer is ... do it in python..
    meaning he has no f***ing idea..

    Just went into #debian on freenode asking about cron and crontab after
    manning the hell out of it and googling.. only to be told by some tard to
    'man 5 crontab'

    turns out he has no idea theres even a difference between crontab on
    debian and slackware
    (he got a little miffed when I told him to man 5 crontab on slackware' to
    see the difference)

    In slackware all I have to do is add a line to /etc/crontab pointing to
    the new directory holding the scripts I want run at the new frequency
    In debian I have to do this as a user ( and I _still_ dont think I have
    done this right but Ive given it a miss until Ive finished throwing my
    little paddy

    ahhhh
    it feels better to vent

    --
    Hardware, n.: The parts of a computer system that can be kicked

    The best way to get the right answer on usenet is to post the wrong one.
    Shane, Jun 5, 2005
    #1
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  2. In article <-a-geek.net>,
    Shane <-a-geek.net> wrote:

    >In slackware all I have to do is add a line to /etc/crontab pointing to
    >the new directory holding the scripts I want run at the new frequency


    Looks the same on my SuSE 9.1 system--not that I've actually tried it..

    >In debian I have to do this as a user ( and I _still_ dont think I have
    >done this right but Ive given it a miss until Ive finished throwing my
    >little paddy


    This could also depend on which particular cron program you're running.
    This Gentoo system that I do programming on, that I've given the care
    and feeding of to another contractor, has something called anacron on
    it, which has the important (mis)feature that it takes over the root
    user's crontab to use as the system crontab, which annoyed me the first
    time I found out about it.
    Lawrence D¹Oliveiro, Jun 5, 2005
    #2
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  3. Shane

    thing Guest

    Shane wrote:
    > what a crap week..
    > met a guy that thinks he knows _everything_
    > but doesnt know what last does, what the -al switches on ls do... or whats
    > held in wtmp.log.. but lectures me on how Im probably running an open
    > relay for mail (not)
    > when I ask him about a perl script... his answer is ... do it in python..
    > meaning he has no f***ing idea..
    >
    > Just went into #debian on freenode asking about cron and crontab after
    > manning the hell out of it and googling.. only to be told by some tard to
    > 'man 5 crontab'
    >
    > turns out he has no idea theres even a difference between crontab on
    > debian and slackware
    > (he got a little miffed when I told him to man 5 crontab on slackware' to
    > see the difference)
    >
    > In slackware all I have to do is add a line to /etc/crontab pointing to
    > the new directory holding the scripts I want run at the new frequency
    > In debian I have to do this as a user ( and I _still_ dont think I have
    > done this right but Ive given it a miss until Ive finished throwing my
    > little paddy
    >
    > ahhhh
    > it feels better to vent
    >



    crontab -e

    then set the frequency and point it at the script........

    Im sure there is a proper "Debian" way but straight forward unix seems fine.

    regards

    Thing
    thing, Jun 5, 2005
    #3
  4. Shane

    Shane Guest


    >
    >
    > crontab -e
    >
    > then set the frequency and point it at the script........
    >
    > Im sure there is a proper "Debian" way but straight forward unix seems fine.
    >
    > regards
    >
    > Thing


    crontab -e is refusing to do it for me as well
    although I tried it as root ( and created a crontab for root)
    it worked perfectly for the established directorys but not for my
    homegrown directory, although it did check at the right frequency (635
    emails in my folder this morning saying /bin/sh: root command not found )
    I've had a feeling overnight that it can only be done as a user, which is
    a biarch


    --
    Hardware, n.: The parts of a computer system that can be kicked

    The best way to get the right answer on usenet is to post the wrong one.
    Shane, Jun 5, 2005
    #4
  5. Shane

    Shane Guest

    On Mon, 06 Jun 2005 08:14:26 +1200, Shane wrote:

    >
    >>
    >>
    >> crontab -e
    >>
    >> then set the frequency and point it at the script........
    >>
    >> Im sure there is a proper "Debian" way but straight forward unix seems fine.
    >>
    >> regards
    >>
    >> Thing

    >
    > crontab -e is refusing to do it for me as well
    > although I tried it as root ( and created a crontab for root)
    > it worked perfectly for the established directorys but not for my
    > homegrown directory, although it did check at the right frequency (635
    > emails in my folder this morning saying /bin/sh: root command not found )
    > I've had a feeling overnight that it can only be done as a user, which is
    > a biarch


    and no.. it didnt
    although the root command not found was because I had left the user feild
    in :\
    f*ck this is annoying

    ahhhh
    its working
    I had a thought to tell it the whole path to my script.. which gave a..
    <scriptname> isnt a directory, so I realised it was at least looking.. and
    found the problem!!
    first of all... IMHO I am a GENIUS!!!!!!!!
    it wanted the trailing /
    ie.
    /etc/cron.tenner/
    and not
    /etc/cron.tenner
    SOMFB!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


    --
    Hardware, n.: The parts of a computer system that can be kicked

    The best way to get the right answer on usenet is to post the wrong one.
    Shane, Jun 5, 2005
    #5
  6. Shane

    thing Guest

    Shane wrote:
    > On Mon, 06 Jun 2005 08:14:26 +1200, Shane wrote:
    >
    >
    >>>
    >>>crontab -e
    >>>
    >>>then set the frequency and point it at the script........
    >>>
    >>>Im sure there is a proper "Debian" way but straight forward unix seems fine.
    >>>
    >>>regards
    >>>
    >>>Thing

    >>
    >>crontab -e is refusing to do it for me as well
    >>although I tried it as root ( and created a crontab for root)
    >>it worked perfectly for the established directorys but not for my
    >>homegrown directory, although it did check at the right frequency (635
    >>emails in my folder this morning saying /bin/sh: root command not found )
    >>I've had a feeling overnight that it can only be done as a user, which is
    >>a biarch

    >
    >
    > and no.. it didnt
    > although the root command not found was because I had left the user feild
    > in :\
    > f*ck this is annoying
    >
    > ahhhh
    > its working
    > I had a thought to tell it the whole path to my script.. which gave a..
    > <scriptname> isnt a directory, so I realised it was at least looking.. and
    > found the problem!!
    > first of all... IMHO I am a GENIUS!!!!!!!!
    > it wanted the trailing /
    > ie.
    > /etc/cron.tenner/
    > and not
    > /etc/cron.tenner
    > SOMFB!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    >
    >


    cron will have no $PATH, so you have to make sure you specify the whole
    path. whats 635? means nothing to me.

    set a cron for */5 say to execute the script every 5 mins so you can test.

    I have always found cron hard work, especially as cron differs on all
    unixes and linux...

    regards

    Thing
    thing, Jun 5, 2005
    #6
  7. Shane

    thing Guest

    Shane wrote:
    >>
    >>crontab -e
    >>
    >>then set the frequency and point it at the script........
    >>
    >>Im sure there is a proper "Debian" way but straight forward unix seems fine.
    >>
    >>regards
    >>
    >>Thing

    >
    >
    > crontab -e is refusing to do it for me as well
    > although I tried it as root ( and created a crontab for root)
    > it worked perfectly for the established directorys but not for my
    > homegrown directory, although it did check at the right frequency (635
    > emails in my folder this morning saying /bin/sh: root command not found )
    > I've had a feeling overnight that it can only be done as a user, which is
    > a biarch
    >
    >
    thing, Jun 5, 2005
    #7
  8. Shane

    Phstpok Guest

    Shane wrote:

    >
    > crontab -e is refusing to do it for me as well
    > although I tried it as root ( and created a crontab for root)
    > it worked perfectly for the established directorys but not for my
    > homegrown directory, although it did check at the right frequency (635
    > emails in my folder this morning saying /bin/sh: root command not found )
    > I've had a feeling overnight that it can only be done as a user, which is
    > a biarch
    >
    >


    If it is a once only, at is the only way to go.

    Unless of course you want to p.. off a fellow admin. Run an at job 1
    minute before his cron is due adding something into his crontab like a
    wall to all users declaring that so and so is a ...

    heh, he never did figure out how that was done. He wasn't that good at
    passwords, always easy to figure out.

    This was on Ultrix, where we edited the cron manually (vi /etc/cron).
    Still, just as easy now to run a little script calling crontab -e, as
    long as you can get su.

    Rob
    Phstpok, Jun 6, 2005
    #8
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