Wedding Ring Latin Inscription

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by ]v[etaphoid, Jul 1, 2010.

  1. ]v[etaphoid

    ]v[etaphoid Guest

    Hello learned friends,

    Any chance anyone could confirm the correct Latin translation for the
    phrase, "All my love, all my life"?

    It's for a good cause - a wedding ring inscription - so there's a chance to
    earn a few bonus karmic points.

    Cheers,
    ]v[eta
     
    ]v[etaphoid, Jul 1, 2010
    #1
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  2. ]v[etaphoid

    Mike Easter Guest

    ]v[etaphoid wrote:

    > Any chance anyone could confirm the correct Latin translation for the
    > phrase, "All my love, all my life"?


    I don't know what the latin dudes will offer, but my online tool said

    totus meus diligo , totus meus vita

    ... but that looks like a literal/word translation. There's probably
    something better.



    --
    Mike Easter
     
    Mike Easter, Jul 1, 2010
    #2
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  3. ]v[etaphoid

    ]v[etaphoid Guest

    "Mike Easter" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > ]v[etaphoid wrote:
    >
    >> Any chance anyone could confirm the correct Latin translation for the
    >> phrase, "All my love, all my life"?

    >
    > I don't know what the latin dudes will offer, but my online tool said
    >
    > totus meus diligo , totus meus vita
    >
    > .. but that looks like a literal/word translation. There's probably
    > something better.


    Thanks for the help.

    That's what I'm going off so far, but there's always concerns that grammar
    can be corrupted in translation. I also think "totus meus amor" instead of
    "totus meus diligo" has a more romanic sound, quite possibly at the risk of
    bastardizing the intended meaning.

    Meh, we'll see how we go...
     
    ]v[etaphoid, Jul 1, 2010
    #3
  4. ]v[etaphoid wrote:
    > Hello learned friends,
    >
    > Any chance anyone could confirm the correct Latin translation for the
    > phrase, "All my love, all my life"?
    >
    > It's for a good cause - a wedding ring inscription - so there's a chance to
    > earn a few bonus karmic points.
    >
    > Cheers,
    > ]v[eta


    A literal rendering would be "Totus amor meus, tota vita mea", but this
    may not necessarily be the best way of doing it.

    I note, by way of interest, that in the song lyric - http://bit.ly/9Us1W9
    - this phrase is the object of the verb "I'll give", so a contextual
    translation would require the accusative case.

    Please wait to see what further suggestions may be forthcoming.

    Patruus
     
    Johannes Patruus, Jul 1, 2010
    #4
  5. ]v[etaphoid

    Evertjan. Guest

    ]v[etaphoid wrote on 01 jul 2010 in alt.language.latin:

    > Any chance anyone could confirm the correct Latin translation for the
    > phrase, "All my love, all my life"?


    1 There is no "THE correct translation",
    translating is a subjective science.

    2 Litterally seen the sentence is not correct in English,
    so before translating it you better tell what you think it means.
    Translating slang into another language without this step usually results
    in a nonsensical translation.results

    Is this a wish?
    "May you be my only love forever?"

    Or a promice?
    "You will be the sole destination of all my loving forever?

    Or is "my love" a vocative?

    3 how can we confirm what you do not give?

    4 Is it nice to inscribe in a wedding ring
    what you do not understand natively?

    --
    Evertjan.
    The Netherlands.
    (Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)
     
    Evertjan., Jul 1, 2010
    #5
  6. Evertjan. wrote:
    > ]v[etaphoid wrote on 01 jul 2010 in alt.language.latin:
    >
    >> Any chance anyone could confirm the correct Latin translation for the
    >> phrase, "All my love, all my life"?

    >
    > 1 There is no "THE correct translation",
    > translating is a subjective science.
    >
    > 2 Litterally seen the sentence is not correct in English,
    > so before translating it you better tell what you think it means.
    > Translating slang into another language without this step usually results
    > in a nonsensical translation.results
    >
    > Is this a wish?
    > "May you be my only love forever?"
    >
    > Or a promice?
    > "You will be the sole destination of all my loving forever?
    >
    > Or is "my love" a vocative?
    >
    > 3 how can we confirm what you do not give?
    >
    > 4 Is it nice to inscribe in a wedding ring
    > what you do not understand natively?


    I don't doubt you could do a similarly glorious demolition job on many of
    the other syntactically questionable wedding ring inscriptions listed on
    this page:
    http://www.allthingsfrugal.com/c_inscriptions.htm

    The length of some of them (e.g., "The World Moves For Love, It Kneels
    Down In Awe Before It") seems to presuppose a prodigiously enlarged digit!

    As to "Gotcha!" as a wedding ring inscription, well gosh, who'da thunk it?

    Patruus
     
    Johannes Patruus, Jul 1, 2010
    #6
  7. ]v[etaphoid

    Evertjan. Guest

    Johannes Patruus wrote on 01 jul 2010 in alt.language.latin:

    > As to "Gotcha!" as a wedding ring inscription,


    Capta!

    Maybe, just maybe, this is also the correct etymology,
    and the "I got you" is just "Hineininterpretierung".

    --
    Evertjan.
    The Netherlands.
    (Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)
     
    Evertjan., Jul 1, 2010
    #7
  8. ]v[etaphoid

    joevan Guest

    On Thu, 01 Jul 2010 15:08:21 -0500, philo <> wrote:

    >On 07/01/2010 09:24 AM, ]v[etaphoid wrote:
    >> Hello learned friends,
    >>
    >> Any chance anyone could confirm the correct Latin translation for the
    >> phrase, "All my love, all my life"?
    >>
    >> It's for a good cause - a wedding ring inscription - so there's a chance to
    >> earn a few bonus karmic points.
    >>
    >> Cheers,
    >> ]v[eta
    >>
    >>

    >I was going to look it up in my Latin dictionary
    >but doggone it...
    >it's one I got from a used book store and it's from 1957
    >
    >so it's out dated
    >
    >LOL

    I have one from 1866 so it must be right on.
     
    joevan, Jul 1, 2010
    #8
  9. ]v[etaphoid

    Jordon Guest

    Evan Platt wrote:
    > On Fri, 2 Jul 2010 00:24:33 +1000, "]v[etaphoid"<]v[>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Hello learned friends,
    >>
    >> Any chance anyone could confirm the correct Latin translation for the
    >> phrase, "All my love, all my life"?
    >>
    >> It's for a good cause - a wedding ring inscription - so there's a chance to
    >> earn a few bonus karmic points.

    >
    > Might I suggest some alternatives? Vini, Vidi, Vici comes to mind...


    Or maybe cave canem.
     
    Jordon, Jul 1, 2010
    #9
  10. ]v[etaphoid

    joevan Guest

    On Thu, 01 Jul 2010 07:51:52 -0700, Mike Easter <>
    wrote:

    >]v[etaphoid wrote:
    >
    >> Any chance anyone could confirm the correct Latin translation for the
    >> phrase, "All my love, all my life"?

    >
    >I don't know what the latin dudes will offer, but my online tool said
    >
    >totus meus diligo , totus meus vita
    >
    >.. but that looks like a literal/word translation. There's probably
    >something better.

    meus diligo , totus meus vita
    similar here. Maybe someone from Rhodes could answer it better.
     
    joevan, Jul 1, 2010
    #10
  11. ]v[etaphoid

    Whiskers Guest

    On 2010-07-01, ]v[etaphoid <> wrote:
    > Hello learned friends,
    >
    > Any chance anyone could confirm the correct Latin translation for the
    > phrase, "All my love, all my life"?
    >
    > It's for a good cause - a wedding ring inscription - so there's a chance to
    > earn a few bonus karmic points.
    >
    > Cheers,
    > ]v[eta


    Why a Latin inscription? If you both understand English, use that!

    The phrase you want translated is ambiguous in English. Such ambiguities
    are difficult or impossible to replicate between different languages. If
    you want something in Latin that expresses what you want, first decide
    exactly what it is you want to say in English.

    Alternatively, go with a well-known 'tag', such as "amor vincit omnia"
    (usually translated as "Love conquers All")

    Before getting anything engraved in a foreign language, get at least two
    independent trustworthy interpretations of what it really means!

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Whiskers, Jul 2, 2010
    #11
  12. ]v[etaphoid <]v[> via
    ]news:4c2ca51a$0$25325$:

    > Hello learned friends,
    >
    > Any chance anyone could confirm the correct Latin translation for the
    > phrase, "All my love, all my life"?
    >
    > It's for a good cause - a wedding ring inscription - so there's a chance
    > to earn a few bonus karmic points.
    >
    > Cheers,
    >]v[eta


    Latin never quite translates "literally" into English, British,
    Autralian, or any other variations of the Honkey-Motherland-Speak.

    Perhaps into Spanish or Italian or one of the Romance languages...

    I'd go with exactly what you mean to say in English, that way
    there is no ambiguity or acedemic argument several years from
    now when a signigicant-other comes home and says "What the ****
    do mean by 'your entire family wants to secks me for all eternity?'"

    Get it? You could Google for some Latin candidates which may hit
    the nail on the head... something like "Semper Copulatus Morte"
    but, Latin form tends to be quite ambiguous without a context,
    both in time and audience.

    Best of lust with your fortuitus fornications.

    --

    I AM Bucky Breeder, (*(^; ; and
    I am NOT Luu Tran's baby-daddy!

    http://www.facebook.com/luu.tran

    Repent! The end is near.... So, smoke 'em if you got 'em.
     
    Bucky Breeder, Jul 2, 2010
    #12
  13. ]v[etaphoid

    Aardvark Guest

    On Fri, 02 Jul 2010 01:02:40 +1000, ]v[etaphoid wrote:

    > "Mike Easter" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> ]v[etaphoid wrote:
    >>
    >>> Any chance anyone could confirm the correct Latin translation for the
    >>> phrase, "All my love, all my life"?

    >>
    >> I don't know what the latin dudes will offer, but my online tool said
    >>
    >> totus meus diligo , totus meus vita
    >>
    >> .. but that looks like a literal/word translation. There's probably
    >> something better.

    >
    > Thanks for the help.
    >
    > That's what I'm going off so far, but there's always concerns that
    > grammar can be corrupted in translation. I also think "totus meus amor"
    > instead of "totus meus diligo" has a more romanic sound, quite possibly
    > at the risk of bastardizing the intended meaning.
    >
    > Meh, we'll see how we go...


    The correct phrase would, I think, be 'Omne amore meo, omne vita mea',
    if I remember my four years of studying Latin as a boy.



    --
    I'm Josef Fritzl, and No Windows was my idea.
     
    Aardvark, Jul 4, 2010
    #13
  14. ]v[etaphoid

    Aardvark Guest

    On Thu, 01 Jul 2010 13:19:02 -0700, Evan Platt wrote:

    > Might I suggest some alternatives? Vini, Vidi, Vici comes to mind...


    That's 'Veni, vidi, vici'.



    --
    I'm Josef Fritzl, and No Windows was my idea.
     
    Aardvark, Jul 4, 2010
    #14
  15. ]v[etaphoid

    Aardvark Guest

    On Thu, 01 Jul 2010 13:57:30 -0700, Jordon wrote:

    > Evan Platt wrote:
    >> On Fri, 2 Jul 2010 00:24:33 +1000, "]v[etaphoid"<]v[>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Hello learned friends,
    >>>
    >>> Any chance anyone could confirm the correct Latin translation for the
    >>> phrase, "All my love, all my life"?
    >>>
    >>> It's for a good cause - a wedding ring inscription - so there's a
    >>> chance to earn a few bonus karmic points.

    >>
    >> Might I suggest some alternatives? Vini, Vidi, Vici comes to mind...

    >
    > Or maybe cave canem.


    "In 1843, British forces led by General Charles Napier conquered the
    province of Sindh in India. On his conquest he was supposed to have sent
    a one word message in Latin to his commander, Peccavi, meaning "I have
    sinned" ("I have Sindh"),"

    I always liked that one.

    --
    I'm Josef Fritzl, and No Windows was my idea.
     
    Aardvark, Jul 4, 2010
    #15
  16. ]v[etaphoid

    Whiskers Guest

    On 2010-07-04, Aardvark <> wrote:
    > On Thu, 01 Jul 2010 13:57:30 -0700, Jordon wrote:
    >
    >> Evan Platt wrote:
    >>> On Fri, 2 Jul 2010 00:24:33 +1000, "]v[etaphoid"<]v[>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Hello learned friends,
    >>>>
    >>>> Any chance anyone could confirm the correct Latin translation for the
    >>>> phrase, "All my love, all my life"?
    >>>>
    >>>> It's for a good cause - a wedding ring inscription - so there's a
    >>>> chance to earn a few bonus karmic points.
    >>>
    >>> Might I suggest some alternatives? Vini, Vidi, Vici comes to mind...

    >>
    >> Or maybe cave canem.

    >
    > "In 1843, British forces led by General Charles Napier conquered the
    > province of Sindh in India. On his conquest he was supposed to have sent
    > a one word message in Latin to his commander, Peccavi, meaning "I have
    > sinned" ("I have Sindh"),"
    >
    > I always liked that one.


    The custom of keeping British forces under-funded has inspired much
    ingenuity. In that instance, the telegram was charged per word so a
    one-word message was cheapest.

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Whiskers, Jul 4, 2010
    #16
  17. ]v[etaphoid

    Aardvark Guest

    On Fri, 02 Jul 2010 17:01:45 +0100, Whiskers wrote:

    > Alternatively, go with a well-known 'tag', such as "amor vincit omnia"
    > (usually translated as "Love conquers All")


    I'm sure that the more syntactically correct version would be 'amor omnia
    vincit'.



    --
    I'm Josef Fritzl, and No Windows was my idea.
     
    Aardvark, Jul 4, 2010
    #17
  18. Aardvark wrote:
    > On Fri, 02 Jul 2010 17:01:45 +0100, Whiskers wrote:
    >
    >> Alternatively, go with a well-known 'tag', such as "amor vincit omnia"
    >> (usually translated as "Love conquers All")

    >
    > I'm sure that the more syntactically correct version would be 'amor omnia
    > vincit'.


    But Virgil wrote: "Omnia vincit amor" (Eclogue X 69).

    Patruus
     
    Johannes Patruus, Jul 4, 2010
    #18
  19. ]v[etaphoid

    Aardvark Guest

    On Sun, 04 Jul 2010 13:34:10 +0100, Whiskers wrote:

    > On 2010-07-04, Aardvark <> wrote:
    >> On Thu, 01 Jul 2010 13:57:30 -0700, Jordon wrote:
    >>
    >>> Evan Platt wrote:
    >>>> On Fri, 2 Jul 2010 00:24:33 +1000, "]v[etaphoid"<]v[>
    >>>> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Hello learned friends,
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Any chance anyone could confirm the correct Latin translation for
    >>>>> the phrase, "All my love, all my life"?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> It's for a good cause - a wedding ring inscription - so there's a
    >>>>> chance to earn a few bonus karmic points.
    >>>>
    >>>> Might I suggest some alternatives? Vini, Vidi, Vici comes to mind...
    >>>
    >>> Or maybe cave canem.

    >>
    >> "In 1843, British forces led by General Charles Napier conquered the
    >> province of Sindh in India. On his conquest he was supposed to have
    >> sent a one word message in Latin to his commander, Peccavi, meaning "I
    >> have sinned" ("I have Sindh"),"
    >>
    >> I always liked that one.

    >
    > The custom of keeping British forces under-funded has inspired much
    > ingenuity. In that instance, the telegram was charged per word so a
    > one-word message was cheapest.


    Yup! I knew that. Laconicism at its best.



    --
    I'm Josef Fritzl, and No Windows was my idea.
     
    Aardvark, Jul 4, 2010
    #19
  20. ]v[etaphoid

    Aardvark Guest

    On Sun, 04 Jul 2010 13:43:52 -0500, B. T. Raven wrote:

    > Aardvark wrote:
    >> On Fri, 02 Jul 2010 17:01:45 +0100, Whiskers wrote:
    >>
    >>> Alternatively, go with a well-known 'tag', such as "amor vincit omnia"
    >>> (usually translated as "Love conquers All")

    >>
    >> I'm sure that the more syntactically correct version would be 'amor
    >> omnia vincit'.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>

    > Why? Aren't they synonymous except for a slight shift in emphasis. SVO
    > order and SOV order are syntactically equivalent. Latin word order isn't
    > completely free but it's much more free than in English, where even
    > "Love all things conquers" can be distinguished from "Love all things
    > conquer," (truer to life in the 21st century). "Man bites dog" and "dog
    > bites man" must mean homo canem mordet and hominem canis mordet,
    > respectively.
    >
    > Eduardus


    You're totally correct, but as I recall, when we were translating from
    English to Latin, the teachers were pretty strict as to the syntactical
    order of words. We were aware that translating back would result in the
    correct meaning in English, but woe betide us if we didn't write that
    which we were expected to write exactly.

    It's what you get when you're taught by psychos. Ask me about 'Boozy
    Hughesy' sometime.

    --
    I'm Josef Fritzl, and No Windows was my idea.
     
    Aardvark, Jul 4, 2010
    #20
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