Wedding Photography

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by John Ortt, Feb 2, 2005.

  1. John Ortt

    John Ortt Guest

    My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father is keep
    to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D

    Can anybody give any advice on how to achieve the best shots at a wedding
    (or point to any sites which can).

    Info such as lens choice and settings would be very useful.

    He will probrably be standing next to a pro photographer anyway so the
    setting and lighting should be fairly good..

    Which reminds me.......We also need to find a pro photographer in the Cavan
    area of Ireland.....any recommendations?
    John Ortt, Feb 2, 2005
    #1
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  2. John Ortt

    Marcel Guest

    Hi John!

    I'm an amateur and I did 2 weddings. It's not an easy task.
    Some pointers:
    1- Use an external flash - It's more powerful and you can direct it.
    2- Get necessary permissions from the "officiant(s)" so as not to disturb
    the ceremony.
    3- Your lenses will have to work in conjunction with the flash / ambient
    light. For instance, it would be useless to use a 200mm lens...
    4- If there's an "official" photographer, don't get in the way.
    5- Go to the pace of the ceremony before hand and shoot some photos to get
    an idea of light, placement, etc.

    This is almost basic but it's coming off as I write. You might say it shows
    ;-)

    Marcel


    "John Ortt" <> wrote in message
    news:4200c49c$...
    > My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father is keep
    > to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D
    >
    > Can anybody give any advice on how to achieve the best shots at a wedding
    > (or point to any sites which can).
    >
    > Info such as lens choice and settings would be very useful.
    >
    > He will probrably be standing next to a pro photographer anyway so the
    > setting and lighting should be fairly good..
    >
    > Which reminds me.......We also need to find a pro photographer in the

    Cavan
    > area of Ireland.....any recommendations?
    >
    >
    Marcel, Feb 2, 2005
    #2
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  3. John Ortt

    Owamanga Guest

    On Wed, 2 Feb 2005 12:23:46 -0000, "John Ortt"
    <> wrote:

    >My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father is keep
    >to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D
    >
    >Can anybody give any advice on how to achieve the best shots at a wedding
    >(or point to any sites which can).


    Pay someone?

    >Info such as lens choice and settings would be very useful.


    Errrr.... most lenses would suffice, except I doubt he'll have much
    use for macro or 1000mm. (Unless you don't invite him of course, in
    which case 1000mm would be a good choice). Normal stuff, a 80-300 zoom
    is useful for candid snaps of guests at a distance, 120mm for bride &
    groom portraits, 28mm for the group shots. External flash of course.

    Give him the camera at least a month before the event, so he has a
    slim chance of learning how to use it.

    >He will probrably be standing next to a pro photographer anyway so the
    >setting and lighting should be fairly good..


    Pros can get annoyed if they are being ghosted by another
    photographer. It's a threat to possible sales of the photos they are
    taking. I've heard they even own a share of the copyright if they
    staged/lit a particular scene.

    You may not mind annoying the pro, but a photographer who is being
    hassled in this way is not 100% concentrating on what he is doing. If
    it were me, I'd want 100% from him.

    Make sure Dad is subtle - eg. definitely no tripod.

    >Which reminds me.......We also need to find a pro photographer in the Cavan
    >area of Ireland.....any recommendations?


    --
    Owamanga!
    Owamanga, Feb 2, 2005
    #3
  4. John Ortt wrote:
    > My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father is
    > keep to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D
    >
    > Can anybody give any advice on how to achieve the best shots at a
    > wedding (or point to any sites which can).
    >
    > Info such as lens choice and settings would be very useful.
    >
    > He will probrably be standing next to a pro photographer anyway so the
    > setting and lighting should be fairly good..
    >
    > Which reminds me.......We also need to find a pro photographer in the
    > Cavan area of Ireland.....any recommendations?


    I am glad you will be using a professional.

    I suggest that if he is not familiar with the camera now, he needs to
    spend some time getting friendly with it. Have him take photos as Sunday
    dinner or anytime the family is together. Don't wait for a special
    occasion. Go over the result with him and between the two of you figure out
    what may have been done better. By the time of the wedding the camera
    should be a tool he is comfortable with and is no longer thinking about how
    to use the camera.

    Second at the wedding, tell him not to stand next to the professional.
    The professional is likely to get better photographs from there anyway.
    Look for what the professional will not get, like a picture of the
    professional taking pictures.

    You father will know the people much better than the professional. He
    should use that information. For example if uncle Pat and aunt Beth are
    dancing together, the professional will think nothing of it, but your father
    will know they have not even spoken to each other since the event 25 years
    ago at the Cliffs hotel at Yough. He can get the photos of the children and
    special family friends that the professional will not have on his list of
    standard photographs.

    --
    Joseph Meehan

    26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
    Joseph Meehan, Feb 2, 2005
    #4
  5. John Ortt

    Martin Brown Guest

    John Ortt wrote:
    > My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father is keep
    > to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D
    >
    > Can anybody give any advice on how to achieve the best shots at a wedding
    > (or point to any sites which can).


    Be sure you know the camera you intend to use and its quirks inside out
    well before the event. You can get astonishingly good informal images
    with modern point and shoot digicams in the right hands. The trick is to
    know how to use your equipment rather than in having the best gear.
    >
    > Info such as lens choice and settings would be very useful.


    A mild wide angle to mid zoom lens should suffice.
    >
    > He will probrably be standing next to a pro photographer anyway so the
    > setting and lighting should be fairly good..


    Be sure to stay out of the pro's way. I use an inconspicuous camera when
    I am present as a wedding guest to avoid upsetting them.

    Most don't mind as long as you stay well off their sight line. And if
    one does just take pictures of your friends and wedding guests instead.
    It is only fair to let the pro set up any formal poses of the couple in
    peace and quiet.
    >
    > Which reminds me.......We also need to find a pro photographer in the Cavan
    > area of Ireland.....any recommendations?


    Ask around locally to see some of their portfolios.

    Regards,
    Marin Brown
    Martin Brown, Feb 2, 2005
    #5
  6. John Ortt

    bob Guest

    John Ortt wrote:
    >
    > He will probrably be standing next to a pro photographer anyway so the
    > setting and lighting should be fairly good..


    The more people who stand next to the professional wedding photographer
    shooting snap shots, the worse your overall outcome will be. People get
    confused and don't know where to look (for the formal shots, that is).

    For the ceremony itself, cameras tend to be a distraction -- the fewer
    the better.

    Ask him if he can shoot the reception, the rehearsal, and the
    preparations, instead. There will be tremendous photo opportunities at
    these other occasions, and his record can provide fantastic memories.

    To pick a photographer, ask freinds who have married for
    recommendations, talk to them, and look at their portfoios.

    Bob
    bob, Feb 2, 2005
    #6
  7. John Ortt

    John Ortt Guest

    Thanks for all the advice so far people, this is just the sort of thing we
    were wanting

    One thing I should have made clear is that my dad is reasonably familiar
    with the 300D as we bought it just after they were released in the UK (Dec
    2003).

    He has always been a keen amateur photographer (film) and I fell in love
    with my V1 digital Ixus about 5 years ago (which I might add is still going
    strong and has taken some amazing photos).

    I decided I wanted to evolve onto SLR's after a Safari Trip using my Ixus
    which was severely disappointing due to it's lack of zoom.
    In the end I had to hold my binoculars to one eye and the camera to the
    other binocular lens to try and get a shot of a lion :)

    I vowed to get a digital SLR as soon as they were affordable and when my dad
    found out he decided to go halves on it with me.
    It has been an ideal solution....I get used to a more mature camera and my
    dad goes digital.

    We have used it mainly for outings and family gatherings so far...it is very
    rare that we are both going somewhere interesting at the same time so we
    have found sharing it to be very convienient.

    We bought the 18-50 (I think) standard canon lens as an optional extra which
    I think equates to about a 28-80 focal lenth in film cameras (please correct
    me if I've got that one wrong).
    we also have a 30-80 (50-120 ish?) which I bought off Ebay which might be
    good for some facial closeups but not as much use as the other lens
    Based on the coments so far I think this lens should be OK
    I have also fitted the original lens with a hoya daylight filter, would
    anybody recomend any different filters?

    We have had great success with the night-time portrait mode in bars and
    clubs on the family parties as the colours are lovely and rich and the
    blurring where people move can produce some excellent results.
    I also find outdoor shots on the standard point and shoot mode to be
    excellent....but not as good as the pros
    Neither of us have experimented with the true manual settings though....

    I think my dad just wants to play with the camera at the wedding to try and
    get some candid shots and other shots which the photographer might not have
    been present at.
    I also wanted him to get a couple of the group scenes aswell (just incase
    the worst case scenario happens and the photographers film doesn't turn out
    etc etc)

    .........but as everybody has pointed out I would quite understand him
    getting a bit peeved if he felt crowded.


    Thanks once again and please feel free to leave any further advice if you
    think it could help.

    John
    John Ortt, Feb 2, 2005
    #7
  8. John Ortt

    P.R.Brady Guest

    John Ortt wrote:
    > My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father is keep
    > to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D
    >
    > Can anybody give any advice on how to achieve the best shots at a wedding
    > (or point to any sites which can).
    >
    > Info such as lens choice and settings would be very useful.
    >
    > He will probrably be standing next to a pro photographer anyway so the
    > setting and lighting should be fairly good..
    >
    > Which reminds me.......We also need to find a pro photographer in the Cavan
    > area of Ireland.....any recommendations?
    >
    >


    Another respondent has suggested he concentrate on the 'informal' shots
    which nobody else will. Don't forget your dad will be in some of the
    formal shots too.

    Also think about buying a disposable cameras with flash to put on each
    table at the reception - you will then get the really fun shots of the
    other guests in an informal setting like the toddlers and grannies.

    Good luck.

    Phil
    P.R.Brady, Feb 2, 2005
    #8
  9. John Ortt

    Frank ess Guest

    John Ortt wrote:
    > Thanks for all the advice so far people, this is just the sort of
    > thing we were wanting
    >


    <snip>

    >
    > I think my dad just wants to play with the camera at the wedding to
    > try and get some candid shots and other shots which the photographer
    > might not have been present at.
    > I also wanted him to get a couple of the group scenes aswell (just
    > incase the worst case scenario happens and the photographers film
    > doesn't turn out etc etc)
    >
    > ........but as everybody has pointed out I would quite understand him
    > getting a bit peeved if he felt crowded.
    >
    >
    > Thanks once again and please feel free to leave any further advice if
    > you think it could help.
    >


    Aha! Why does it have to be "him" getting peeved?

    Wasn't there a woman from the Auld Sod here in the recent past, and
    principally interested in doing weddings? It'd be quite a coincidence if
    she were from the same area, but ...

    How to find her?


    --
    Frank ess

    PS: My daughter and granddaughter spent some time on the Dingle (?!)
    Peninsula at New Year's. They said it was marvelous.
    Frank ess, Feb 2, 2005
    #9
  10. John Ortt wrote:
    > Thanks for all the advice so far people, this is just the sort of
    > thing we were wanting
    >

    ....

    > I also wanted him to get a couple of the group scenes aswell (just
    > incase the worst case scenario happens and the photographers film
    > doesn't turn out etc etc)
    >


    And it does happen. I once worked for a large department store. The
    general managers daughter was being married so he called on the store
    portrait studio to do the job. They sent on of their regulars to do the
    job. It was his second wedding of the day. He had tipped a few too many at
    the first wedding and the entire second wedding was shoot on the same roll
    of film. I was manager of the photo retail sales and photo processing
    department. I ended up collecting all the pictures all the guest had taken
    and ended up with a nice album. Years later she married my cousin.

    ....

    >
    > Thanks once again and please feel free to leave any further advice if
    > you think it could help.
    >
    > John


    --
    Joseph Meehan

    26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
    Joseph Meehan, Feb 3, 2005
    #10
  11. John Ortt

    RustY© Guest

    "John Ortt" <> wrote in message
    news:4200c49c$...
    > My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father is keep
    > to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D


    Talk him out of it!! This can only end in tears, either for you or him.
    Let him enjoy the day like a normal guest of honour.
    RustY©, Feb 3, 2005
    #11
  12. John Ortt

    John Ortt Guest

    "RustY©" <> wrote in message
    news:wUkMd.20$...
    >
    > "John Ortt" <> wrote in message
    > news:4200c49c$...
    > > My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father wants
    > > to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D

    >
    > Talk him out of it!! This can only end in tears, either for you or him.
    > Let him enjoy the day like a normal guest of honour.


    It wasn't my decision, he wants to do it. I am sure my fiancee will step in
    to ensure that the camera is put aside for all the shots he is supposed to
    be in (she can be very firm when she wants to), but he thinks he will enjoy
    the day more if he is allowed to do some photography.....
    John Ortt, Feb 3, 2005
    #12
  13. John Ortt

    John Ortt Guest

    <snip>
    > > ........but as everybody has pointed out I would quite understand him
    > > getting a bit peeved if he felt crowded.
    > >

    > Aha! Why does it have to be "him" getting peeved?


    Sorry, very un-pc :)
    I think my brain was clouded due to all the photographers I have found so
    far in the area being male.

    >
    > Wasn't there a woman from the Auld Sod here in the recent past, and
    > principally interested in doing weddings? It'd be quite a coincidence if
    > she were from the same area, but ...
    >
    > How to find her?
    >

    Lets hope she still reads the NG's..........
    John Ortt, Feb 3, 2005
    #13
  14. John Ortt

    John Ortt Guest

    > Another respondent has suggested he concentrate on the 'informal' shots
    > which nobody else will. Don't forget your dad will be in some of the
    > formal shots too.


    I think (hope) that is the direction he is going to take..... :)

    > Also think about buying a disposable cameras with flash to put on each
    > table at the reception - you will then get the really fun shots of the
    > other guests in an informal setting like the toddlers and grannies.


    Yes, I think we will be doing. Some of our friends have done this at their
    weddings and for a relatively small outlay they have got some lovely snaps.
    (Lots of junk too but a few good ones is well worth the waste).

    > Good luck.
    >
    > Phil
    >
    John Ortt, Feb 3, 2005
    #14
  15. John Ortt

    Ron Hunter Guest

    RustY© wrote:
    > "John Ortt" <> wrote in message
    > news:4200c49c$...
    >
    >>My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father is keep
    >>to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D

    >
    >
    > Talk him out of it!! This can only end in tears, either for you or him.
    > Let him enjoy the day like a normal guest of honour.
    >
    >

    Indeed, let him enjoy the ocassion! Hire some bad tempered, obnoxious,
    and expensive professional. You will get better pictures, and if you
    hate HIM after the ceremony, there is no harm done.


    --
    Ron Hunter
    Ron Hunter, Feb 3, 2005
    #15
  16. John Ortt

    Ron Hunter Guest

    John Ortt wrote:
    > "RustY©" <> wrote in message
    > news:wUkMd.20$...
    >
    >>"John Ortt" <> wrote in message
    >>news:4200c49c$...
    >>
    >>>My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father wants
    >>>to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D

    >>
    >>Talk him out of it!! This can only end in tears, either for you or him.
    >>Let him enjoy the day like a normal guest of honour.

    >
    >
    > It wasn't my decision, he wants to do it. I am sure my fiancee will step in
    > to ensure that the camera is put aside for all the shots he is supposed to
    > be in (she can be very firm when she wants to), but he thinks he will enjoy
    > the day more if he is allowed to do some photography.....
    >
    >

    Sure, allow him (an anyone else) to take pictures, especially at any
    reception/party after the wedding, but reserve the main shots for a pro.
    After all, he should be IN many of those shots, and you will regret it
    later if he is not.


    --
    Ron Hunter
    Ron Hunter, Feb 3, 2005
    #16
  17. Ron Hunter wrote:
    > RustY© wrote:
    >> "John Ortt" <> wrote in
    >> message news:4200c49c$...
    >>
    >>> My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father
    >>> is keep to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D

    >>
    >>
    >> Talk him out of it!! This can only end in tears, either for you or
    >> him. Let him enjoy the day like a normal guest of honour.
    >>
    >>

    > Indeed, let him enjoy the ocassion! Hire some bad tempered,
    > obnoxious, and expensive professional. You will get better pictures,
    > and if you hate HIM after the ceremony, there is no harm done.


    Ron, read the thread. He is hiring a professional.

    --
    Joseph Meehan

    26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
    Joseph Meehan, Feb 3, 2005
    #17
  18. RustY© wrote:
    > "John Ortt" <> wrote in
    > message news:4200c49c$...
    >> My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father
    >> is keep to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D

    >
    > Talk him out of it!! This can only end in tears, either for you or
    > him. Let him enjoy the day like a normal guest of honour.


    I disagree. While it can be overdone, it does not sound like that will
    happen here. The father enjoys photography and appears to do well. Telling
    him he should not do what he likes and can do well would detract from the
    day not add to it. Photography is a part of many people, a part that fits
    into events like weddings. To deny that is artificial and would detract from
    the event.

    --
    Joseph Meehan

    26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
    Joseph Meehan, Feb 3, 2005
    #18
  19. "Joseph Meehan" <> wrote in message
    news:n3nMd.1174$...
    > RustY© wrote:
    >> "John Ortt" <> wrote in
    >> message news:4200c49c$...
    >>> My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father
    >>> is keep to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D

    >>
    >> Talk him out of it!! This can only end in tears, either for you or
    >> him. Let him enjoy the day like a normal guest of honour.

    >
    > I disagree. While it can be overdone, it does not sound like that will
    > happen here. The father enjoys photography and appears to do well.
    > Telling him he should not do what he likes and can do well would detract
    > from the day not add to it. Photography is a part of many people, a part
    > that fits into events like weddings. To deny that is artificial and would
    > detract from the event.
    >
    > --
    > Joseph Meehan
    >
    > 26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
    >

    Some people do not feel very comfortable at such family festivities and my
    opinion below is based on personal experience.
    Perhaps Dad will feel that he can attend the event and be happy as long as
    he can have the camera as an excuse to wander among the other guests,
    chatting here and there, and breaking off when required to go take some more
    pictures. Let Dad do his thing and be happy to have him share in your
    special day. You have the professional photographer there for the official
    shots, so nothing is lost as long as Dad does not step on his toes.

    Best wishes to you and your fiancé, and of course Dad !

    Dennis
    Dennis Bradley, Feb 3, 2005
    #19
  20. John Ortt

    DJ Guest

    On Wed, 2 Feb 2005 12:23:46 -0000, "John Ortt"
    <> wrote:

    >My fiancee and I are getting married later this year and my father is keep
    >to rattle off some shots on our EOS 300D
    >
    >Can anybody give any advice on how to achieve the best shots at a wedding
    >(or point to any sites which can).
    >
    >Info such as lens choice and settings would be very useful.
    >
    >He will probrably be standing next to a pro photographer anyway so the
    >setting and lighting should be fairly good..
    >
    >Which reminds me.......We also need to find a pro photographer in the Cavan
    >area of Ireland.....any recommendations?
    >


    I have been official photographer at a couple of weddings recently and I've also
    been informally taking pictures at a couple. In the latter case I've kept *well*
    out of the pro's way and concentrated on stuff he wasn't and couldn't be doing.
    In each case the bridal couple have loved my pictures, because they have a
    different slant and complement the pro's. Why stand next to the pro and steal
    the results of his work in setting up shots?

    In a non-official capacity I do candids, whacky angles, pics of the photographer
    taking pics and so on. As it happens I use a 300D. I also have an EF 50mm/1.8
    lens, and love cranking up to ISO1600 and getting candids of the dancers, the
    band, drunken louts at the tables, 8 year old daughters dancing with Auntie
    Edna, whatever. Then I might revert to a clip-on flash (420EX) bounced off the
    ceiling for some "insurance" shots of the reception guests. Official
    photographers often do not cover the reception, so an "unofficial" coverage may
    be the only one.

    Also, rember rule number 1: Practice beforehand.
    DJ, Feb 3, 2005
    #20
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