wedding group shot with a telephoto zoom or shorter zoom ?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by oleuncleted@aol.com, Dec 11, 2008.

  1. Guest

    what is your prefered method of taking group shots of a wedding party
    indoors and outside ?
    i seen them done with a shorter zoom and also have seen but not to
    often a 70-200 with the photographer far enough away and his
    assistant closer to the group holding the flash triggered by him.
     
    , Dec 11, 2008
    #1
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  2. J. Clarke Guest

    wrote:
    > what is your prefered method of taking group shots of a wedding
    > party
    > indoors and outside ?
    > i seen them done with a shorter zoom and also have seen but not to
    > often a 70-200 with the photographer far enough away and his
    > assistant closer to the group holding the flash triggered by him.


    Geez, how much room do you have to work with? Indoors you can't shoot
    through a wall--you need to use a lens wide enough to get the whole
    group in at a distance that you can achieve. Outdoors there's
    generally a fence or wall or hedge that establishes a barrier in the
    same way but it's likely to be farther back. How much lighting do you
    have? Enough to be able to keep it out of frame if you shoot with a
    tele?

    --
    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
     
    J. Clarke, Dec 11, 2008
    #2
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  3. Don Stauffer Guest

    wrote:
    > what is your prefered method of taking group shots of a wedding party
    > indoors and outside ?
    > i seen them done with a shorter zoom and also have seen but not to
    > often a 70-200 with the photographer far enough away and his
    > assistant closer to the group holding the flash triggered by him.



    Forget whether or not it is a "zoom" lens, and just worry about the
    focal length you are using. It is not a good idea to shoot people with
    too short a focal length. For individuals, short focal lengths make
    noses big and ears small. For group shots, it makes people on ends
    shorter than people in middle.

    Many folks feel a lens of about 75-85 mm (35mm equivalent) is just right
    for portraits. Any lens that has this in its range is okay. Longer
    focal lengths are okay, stay away from going much shorter, though for
    groups even 50 mm is not too bad. Stay away from going much shorter.

    So pick a focal length and move back and forward to get the group in the
    field. As I say, if there is something blocking the area in front of
    you, you can use longer focal lengths.
     
    Don Stauffer, Dec 11, 2008
    #3
  4. Jurgen Guest

    J. Clarke wrote:
    > wrote:
    >> what is your prefered method of taking group shots of a wedding
    >> party
    >> indoors and outside ?
    >> i seen them done with a shorter zoom and also have seen but not to
    >> often a 70-200 with the photographer far enough away and his
    >> assistant closer to the group holding the flash triggered by him.

    >
    > Geez, how much room do you have to work with? Indoors you can't shoot
    > through a wall--you need to use a lens wide enough to get the whole
    > group in at a distance that you can achieve. Outdoors there's
    > generally a fence or wall or hedge that establishes a barrier in the
    > same way but it's likely to be farther back. How much lighting do you
    > have? Enough to be able to keep it out of frame if you shoot with a
    > tele?
    >


    I carry a step ladder. Hight overcomes many obstructions, even indoors.

    Good quality lenses in the range of 30mm for FF sensors and 24MM for
    crop sensors don't generally produce enough distortion that can't be
    corrected in post process.

    The big issue with a group shot is in not being able to see much detail
    in people. I often shoot 10 or more frames just in case I need to cut
    and paste for people who blink or don't pay attention.

    You can almost never light a crowd evenly. In any case, where do you
    find enough flash power to cover them anyway? Much better to use natural
    light or if indoors, available room light. You're not going to do this
    with a P&S camera because you need some serious high ISO performance or,
    a crowd who'll stay still and not blink!
     
    Jurgen, Dec 11, 2008
    #4
  5. N Guest

    "J. Clarke" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > wrote:
    >> what is your prefered method of taking group shots of a wedding
    >> party
    >> indoors and outside ?
    >> i seen them done with a shorter zoom and also have seen but not to
    >> often a 70-200 with the photographer far enough away and his
    >> assistant closer to the group holding the flash triggered by him.

    >
    > Geez, how much room do you have to work with? Indoors you can't shoot
    > through a wall--you need to use a lens wide enough to get the whole
    > group in at a distance that you can achieve. Outdoors there's
    > generally a fence or wall or hedge that establishes a barrier in the
    > same way but it's likely to be farther back. How much lighting do you
    > have? Enough to be able to keep it out of frame if you shoot with a
    > tele?
    >



    Sometimes there's plenty of space:
    http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1001/750722465_1670c73d8d.jpg
    http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1047/751559664_3566697601.jpg
    http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1391/751571360_3367fd738b.jpg
     
    N, Dec 12, 2008
    #5
  6. Guest

    On Thu, 11 Dec 2008 11:19:48 -0600, Halston Addisen
    <> wrote:



    >...
    >Hint: Weddings usually take place in large chapels and large halls where there's
    >plenty of room.


    I don't know about you, but I always tried to take the group shoots
    well away from the hubbub of the wedding. That often ended up being a
    smaller area. With groups a large part of getting good photos quickly
    is to limit distractions and on-lookers.

    There are no set rules. The photographer usually relies on his or
    her experience. Each wedding is unique.

    Note: I really don't think the OP needed the non responsive
    comments.
     
    , Dec 12, 2008
    #6
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