Wear-levelling question

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Feb 4, 2008.

  1. If I have a 4GB flash drive with 2.5GB of stuff already on it, and I'm
    creating and deleting files only within the remaining 1.5GB of space, am I
    right in assuming that all the wear and tear from writes will be confined
    to that 1.5GB, that the drive controller's wear-levelling algorithm will
    not be able to spread any of the wear into the other 2.5GB?

    If that's right, then to prolong the life of the flash drive in my Eee, I
    should periodically back up the OS installation, reformat the drive, and
    copy it back on again, to spread the wear around all the sectors.
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Feb 4, 2008
    #1
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  2. On Feb 4, 9:27 pm, Lawrence D'Oliveiro <l...@geek-
    central.gen.new_zealand> wrote:
    > If I have a 4GB flash drive with 2.5GB of stuff already on it, and I'm
    > creating and deleting files only within the remaining 1.5GB of space, am I
    > right in assuming that all the wear and tear from writes will be confined
    > to that 1.5GB, that the drive controller's wear-levelling algorithm will
    > not be able to spread any of the wear into the other 2.5GB?
    >
    > If that's right, then to prolong the life of the flash drive in my Eee, I
    > should periodically back up the OS installation, reformat the drive, and
    > copy it back on again, to spread the wear around all the sectors.


    how long do you intend to use the device for?
     
    Nathan Mercer, Feb 4, 2008
    #2
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  3. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    PeeCee Guest

    "Lawrence D'Oliveiro" <_zealand> wrote in message
    news:fo6i8j$206$...
    > If I have a 4GB flash drive with 2.5GB of stuff already on it, and I'm
    > creating and deleting files only within the remaining 1.5GB of space, am I
    > right in assuming that all the wear and tear from writes will be confined
    > to that 1.5GB, that the drive controller's wear-levelling algorithm will
    > not be able to spread any of the wear into the other 2.5GB?
    >
    > If that's right, then to prolong the life of the flash drive in my Eee, I
    > should periodically back up the OS installation, reformat the drive, and
    > copy it back on again, to spread the wear around all the sectors.



    Lawrence

    Interesting calculations here:
    http://www.esacademy.com/faq/docs/flash/lifetime.htm
    & here
    http://lkml.org/lkml/2006/3/21/331

    Paul.
     
    PeeCee, Feb 4, 2008
    #3
  4. In article
    <>, Nathan
    Mercer did write:

    > how long do you intend to use the device for?


    Same as most of the other hardware I buy--for as long as it works.
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Feb 4, 2008
    #4
  5. Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Feb 4, 2008
    #5
  6. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    peterwn Guest

    On Feb 5, 12:10 pm, Lawrence D'Oliveiro <l...@geek-
    central.gen.new_zealand> wrote:

    >
    > What are the oldest flash-based devices still in common use? I wonder how
    > they're holding up.


    I have a 2 1/2 year old "PQI" 512M flash stick which has a bad patch
    on it.
     
    peterwn, Feb 5, 2008
    #6
  7. In article
    <>,
    peterwn did write:

    > On Feb 5, 12:10 pm, Lawrence D'Oliveiro <l...@geek-
    > central.gen.new_zealand> wrote:
    >
    >> What are the oldest flash-based devices still in common use? I wonder how
    >> they're holding up.

    >
    > I have a 2 1/2 year old "PQI" 512M flash stick which has a bad patch
    > on it.


    Thanks. See, that's the kind of thing that worries me. :)
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Feb 5, 2008
    #7
  8. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Guest

    On Mon, 4 Feb 2008 18:06:51 -0800 (PST), peterwn <> wrote:

    >On Feb 5, 12:10 pm, Lawrence D'Oliveiro <l...@geek-
    >central.gen.new_zealand> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> What are the oldest flash-based devices still in common use? I wonder how
    >> they're holding up.

    >
    >I have a 2 1/2 year old "PQI" 512M flash stick which has a bad patch
    >on it.



    Have you done a full reformat..?
     
    , Feb 5, 2008
    #8
  9. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    peterwn Guest

    On Feb 5, 4:06 pm, wrote:
    > On Mon, 4 Feb 2008 18:06:51 -0800 (PST), peterwn <> wrote:
    > >On Feb 5, 12:10 pm, Lawrence D'Oliveiro <l...@geek-
    > >central.gen.new_zealand> wrote:

    >
    > >> What are the oldest flash-based devices still in common use? I wonder how
    > >> they're holding up.

    >
    > >I have a 2 1/2 year old "PQI" 512M flash stick which has a bad patch
    > >on it.

    >
    > Have you done a full reformat..?



    I can't remember. Is a full foermat a 'yes-yes' or a 'no-no'?
     
    peterwn, Feb 5, 2008
    #9
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