Wax-Based Printers?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by (PeteCresswell), Jan 25, 2008.

  1. Don't hear much about them any more.

    Printed a high school class reunion booklet on one several years
    back and it seemed to work at least as well as the ink jets that
    I also printed some copies on.

    Are they history?

    Reason I'm wondering is that I use my inkjet color printer so
    seldom that when I do use it, the ink reservoirs seem to have
    dried up.

    I'm thinking that with a wax-based printer, that wouldn't be an
    issue.
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
    (PeteCresswell), Jan 25, 2008
    #1
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  2. (PeteCresswell)

    Mr. G D Geen Guest

    (PeteCresswell) wrote:
    > Don't hear much about them any more.
    >
    > Printed a high school class reunion booklet on one several years
    > back and it seemed to work at least as well as the ink jets that
    > I also printed some copies on.
    >
    > Are they history?
    >
    > Reason I'm wondering is that I use my inkjet color printer so
    > seldom that when I do use it, the ink reservoirs seem to have
    > dried up.
    >
    > I'm thinking that with a wax-based printer, that wouldn't be an
    > issue.


    Xerox bought the Phaser line of printers from Tektronix who wanted to
    focus back on their test equipment. You can still get solid ink
    printers from Xerox, see <http://www.office.xerox.com/index/enus.html>.

    I used to call the color sticks crayons just to see the sales rep.'s
    neck veins pop out. :) The output used to be really good but I have
    not used one in quite some time. The Phaser 8560 is $700 after rebate.
    Good luck. -G
     
    Mr. G D Geen, Jan 25, 2008
    #2
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  3. (PeteCresswell) wrote:

    > Don't hear much about them any more.


    They are still alive and kicking.

    <http://www.office.xerox.com/index/enus.html>

    > Printed a high school class reunion booklet on one several years
    > back and it seemed to work at least as well as the ink jets that
    > I also printed some copies on.


    They work OK for pics that are going to magazine quality, nothing more.
    Though these solid ink printers claim a 2,400dpi resolution it doesn't look
    it. I would never use one for photo quality printing as they don't cut the
    mustard for that. The raised look and feel of the print/images are amazing.

    > Are they history?


    Nope! I've had the unique opportunity to own and use every model
    Tektronix/Xerox Phaser printer ever made. Tractor trailer full loads of
    them in fact.

    > Reason I'm wondering is that I use my inkjet color printer so
    > seldom that when I do use it, the ink reservoirs seem to have
    > dried up.


    It's worse with solid ink printers. You clog the print heads and it's a
    $1,200 fix. Now to let you in on what you are getting yourself into. First
    off, this is a printer you leave on 24/7/365 as it has a cleaning cycle at
    startup and shutdown that consumes a hell of a lot of ink. About 1/2 to 3/4
    stick of each color for a complete on/off cycling. Color Stix come in 3-per
    color pack and they are over $100 per color, black is usually free. You're
    looking at $300 just to start the printer. It has a heater and stays hot.
    It has a fan and sucks air and dust that will ultimately clog your print
    heads.

    > I'm thinking that with a wax-based printer, that wouldn't be an
    > issue.


    It's a powerful printer with an ethernet connection and web interface that
    makes printing amazingly enjoyable. They are built for high volume jobs.
    Unless you do high volume printing don't even think about it! If you do
    enough volume you can get free printers, free black ink, and sign a contract
    with Xerox to buy a specified quantity of Color Stix annually. THIS IS NOT
    A HOME OWNER PRINTER!!! I've had free printers and unlimited free ink and I
    won't keep one in my house.







    Rita
     
    Rita Berkowitz, Jan 25, 2008
    #3
  4. (PeteCresswell)

    ray Guest

    On Fri, 25 Jan 2008 17:17:21 -0500, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

    > Don't hear much about them any more.
    >
    > Printed a high school class reunion booklet on one several years back
    > and it seemed to work at least as well as the ink jets that I also
    > printed some copies on.
    >
    > Are they history?
    >
    > Reason I'm wondering is that I use my inkjet color printer so seldom
    > that when I do use it, the ink reservoirs seem to have dried up.
    >
    > I'm thinking that with a wax-based printer, that wouldn't be an issue.


    FWIW - the Kodak printer docks use a dye-sub system which won't dry out.
    I believe a few other small form factor printers do similarly - I'm not
    aware of any units for larger than 4x6 prints.
     
    ray, Jan 26, 2008
    #4
  5. (PeteCresswell)

    Pudentame Guest

    Rita Berkowitz wrote:
    > (PeteCresswell) wrote:
    >
    >> Don't hear much about them any more.

    >
    > They are still alive and kicking.
    >
    > <http://www.office.xerox.com/index/enus.html>
    >


    If you're looking for something a little less substantial, something
    that won't require $300 in materials every time you turn it on, you
    might look at Kodak's line of dye sublimation wax-thermal printers.

    That's what's in all those Kodak kiosks where you can get your "prints
    in seconds".
     
    Pudentame, Jan 26, 2008
    #5
  6. In article <>,
    "(PeteCresswell)" <> wrote:

    > Don't hear much about them any more.
    >
    > Printed a high school class reunion booklet on one several years
    > back and it seemed to work at least as well as the ink jets that
    > I also printed some copies on.
    >
    > Are they history?
    >
    > Reason I'm wondering is that I use my inkjet color printer so
    > seldom that when I do use it, the ink reservoirs seem to have
    > dried up.
    >
    > I'm thinking that with a wax-based printer, that wouldn't be an
    > issue.


    Some ink jet printers are better than others. I had nothing but trouble
    with Epson photographic printers.

    --
    I don't read Google's spam. Reply with another service.
     
    Kevin McMurtrie, Jan 26, 2008
    #6
  7. Pudentame wrote:

    >>> Don't hear much about them any more.

    >>
    >> They are still alive and kicking.
    >>
    >> <http://www.office.xerox.com/index/enus.html>
    >>

    >
    > If you're looking for something a little less substantial, something
    > that won't require $300 in materials every time you turn it on, you
    > might look at Kodak's line of dye sublimation wax-thermal printers.


    Thanks for the tip. I've already been there. Dye subs are pretty cool, but
    can be very costly per print depending on what size prints one makes, just
    look at the print pattern on the spent roll. For my low volume needs I have
    abandoned all in-home high-end printing and farm it out. It's cheaper, less
    maintenance, easier, and less time consuming. I use a decent local printer
    that takes care of all my printing needs and if there is a mistake or
    damaged print they will reprint for free.





    Rita
     
    Rita Berkowitz, Jan 26, 2008
    #7
  8. Per Rita Berkowitz:
    >Thanks for the tip. I've already been there. Dye subs are pretty cool, but
    >can be very costly per print depending on what size prints one makes, just
    >look at the print pattern on the spent roll. For my low volume needs I have
    >abandoned all in-home high-end printing and farm it out.


    Seems like the last time I priced home supplies against a Kiosk
    in the local drug store, they were close enough that cost wasn't
    a consideration.

    Does that recollection sound reasonable or suspect?
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
    (PeteCresswell), Jan 26, 2008
    #8
  9. (PeteCresswell)

    Dave Guest

    (PeteCresswell) wrote:
    > Don't hear much about them any more.
    >
    > Printed a high school class reunion booklet on one several years
    > back and it seemed to work at least as well as the ink jets that
    > I also printed some copies on.
    >
    > Are they history?
    >
    > Reason I'm wondering is that I use my inkjet color printer so
    > seldom that when I do use it, the ink reservoirs seem to have
    > dried up.
    >
    > I'm thinking that with a wax-based printer, that wouldn't be an
    > issue.

    Hey Pete,

    How large do you need to go? If 6x8 (bigger than it sounds) will do, I
    can highly recommend the HiTouch 730 or newer 730S. I have 2 of their
    printers (631PL for my 4x6 stuff and 730PS for 6x8). The 730 can print
    4x6, 5x7 and 6x8 BTW. PL models have to be connected to a computer while
    the PS models can print directly from memory cards without the need for
    the computer.

    FYI - I bought the 631PL new 3 years ago and added the 730PS used as my
    Christmas present from my wife this past year (12-25-07). If I had
    gotten the 730 new I would not have bothered with the stand alone
    version as I tweak all my stuff before printing.

    I have been very pleased with both.

    If you'd like to discuss this, shoot me an E-Mail and I'll send you my
    phone number and schedule so we can talk. There are pluses and minuses
    to these printers. Pluses way out weigh the minuses IMHO.


    Best,
    Dave >You know, from Hickam. Just in case CRS has set in =;~)<

    PS - The place I got my 730PS had/has a S400 (heavy duty 4x6 $249.00
    retail) in "mint- condition for $99.00) Give me a shout for Info.
     
    Dave, Jan 26, 2008
    #9
  10. (PeteCresswell)

    Lazlo Lebrun Guest

    Kevin McMurtrie wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > "(PeteCresswell)" <> wrote:
    >
    >> Don't hear much about them any more.
    >>
    >> Printed a high school class reunion booklet on one several years
    >> back and it seemed to work at least as well as the ink jets that
    >> I also printed some copies on.
    >>
    >> Are they history?
    >>
    >> Reason I'm wondering is that I use my inkjet color printer so
    >> seldom that when I do use it, the ink reservoirs seem to have
    >> dried up.
    >>
    >> I'm thinking that with a wax-based printer, that wouldn't be an
    >> issue.

    >
    > Some ink jet printers are better than others. I had nothing but trouble
    > with Epson photographic printers.
    >

    I have an Epson Stylus pro 5000 since 6 years. OK it was a $3800 deal,
    but it has probably printed more than half a ton of excellent
    photographic quality DIN A3 documents, without clogging. It still has
    the same printing head. I needed to changs the exceeding ink swamp
    twice. The first time it was exchanged for free the second time it
    costed $120 with labour.
    The ink (overdated, don't mind) sells on Ebay for <5$ and a cartridge
    has 300mL.
    Laszlo
     
    Lazlo Lebrun, Jan 26, 2008
    #10
  11. Per Dave:
    >Hey Pete,
    >
    >How large do you need to go? If 6x8 (bigger than it sounds) will do, I
    >can highly recommend the HiTouch 730 or newer 730S. I have 2 of their
    >printers (631PL for my 4x6 stuff and 730PS for 6x8). The 730 can print
    >4x6, 5x7 and 6x8 BTW. PL models have to be connected to a computer while
    >the PS models can print directly from memory cards without the need for
    >the computer.


    I think Rita's cured me of my wax-based fantasies.

    Printer-wise, I prefer 8.5 x 11 just for general use - not
    necessarily photos - using the scanner as a color copier, for
    instance.... Recipes and stuff like that.


    For photo prints the kiosk approach is gaining ground with me for
    another reason: My wife correctly observes that since we went
    digital, we take a lot of pix, but she winds up with very few
    prints - and those she does have tend to fade.

    Habituating ourselves to using the kiosk instead of making some
    prints "when I get around to it"... would cure that: we'd get
    prints, and they'd be long-lasting prints... Maybe even load up a
    CF or SD card with the selected pix and let somebody else make
    the trip to the drug store....
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
    (PeteCresswell), Jan 26, 2008
    #11
  12. (PeteCresswell) wrote:

    >> Thanks for the tip. I've already been there. Dye subs are pretty
    >> cool, but can be very costly per print depending on what size prints
    >> one makes, just look at the print pattern on the spent roll. For my
    >> low volume needs I have abandoned all in-home high-end printing and
    >> farm it out.

    >
    > Seems like the last time I priced home supplies against a Kiosk
    > in the local drug store, they were close enough that cost wasn't
    > a consideration.
    >
    > Does that recollection sound reasonable or suspect?


    It depends on your printing habits and volume. If you print one 4x6 image
    it consumes the same amount of consumables as one largest print the printer
    is capable of printing. The optimum strategy is to get as many small prints
    to fit into the same space as the largest single print the printer is
    capable of, or just print big prints. Since kiosks mostly print small
    prints they are optimized for getting as many prints per page they can fit.
    They also get bulk discounts on consumables. It seems consumables are a bit
    cheaper now than they were a few years ago, but is it going to be cost
    effective for you? I don't know. Factor in the price of the printer,
    paper, ribbon, and electricity and you might find it breaks even. If
    convenience is your main objective than you can justify a higher per print
    cost.







    Rita
     
    Rita Berkowitz, Jan 26, 2008
    #12
  13. (PeteCresswell)

    tony cooper Guest

    On Sat, 26 Jan 2008 17:11:15 -0500, "Rita Berkowitz"
    <> wrote:

    >(PeteCresswell) wrote:
    >
    >>> Thanks for the tip. I've already been there. Dye subs are pretty
    >>> cool, but can be very costly per print depending on what size prints
    >>> one makes, just look at the print pattern on the spent roll. For my
    >>> low volume needs I have abandoned all in-home high-end printing and
    >>> farm it out.

    >>
    >> Seems like the last time I priced home supplies against a Kiosk
    >> in the local drug store, they were close enough that cost wasn't
    >> a consideration.
    >>
    >> Does that recollection sound reasonable or suspect?

    >
    >It depends on your printing habits and volume. If you print one 4x6 image
    >it consumes the same amount of consumables as one largest print the printer
    >is capable of printing. The optimum strategy is to get as many small prints
    >to fit into the same space as the largest single print the printer is
    >capable of, or just print big prints. Since kiosks mostly print small
    >prints they are optimized for getting as many prints per page they can fit.
    >They also get bulk discounts on consumables. It seems consumables are a bit
    >cheaper now than they were a few years ago, but is it going to be cost
    >effective for you? I don't know. Factor in the price of the printer,
    >paper, ribbon, and electricity and you might find it breaks even. If
    >convenience is your main objective than you can justify a higher per print
    >cost.
    >


    The cost of the ribbon? What kind of printer do you have? An
    Underwood? Does it use a black and red ribbon?

    I just sent one of those drugstore 4 x 6 albums to my brother in
    Denmark. There were 64 4 x 6's of shots of the family in 2007. I
    uploaded the 64 images to Walgreen's website, picked up the prints the
    next morning, and paid $6.40 plus sales tax.

    The postage to Denmark was more than the cost of the album and prints.


    --

    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Jan 26, 2008
    #13
  14. (PeteCresswell)

    tony cooper Guest

    On Sat, 26 Jan 2008 16:27:37 -0500, "(PeteCresswell)" <>
    wrote:

    >Per Dave:
    >>Hey Pete,
    >>
    >>How large do you need to go? If 6x8 (bigger than it sounds) will do, I
    >>can highly recommend the HiTouch 730 or newer 730S. I have 2 of their
    >>printers (631PL for my 4x6 stuff and 730PS for 6x8). The 730 can print
    >>4x6, 5x7 and 6x8 BTW. PL models have to be connected to a computer while
    >>the PS models can print directly from memory cards without the need for
    >>the computer.

    >
    >I think Rita's cured me of my wax-based fantasies.


    You saw her Brazilian?

    >Habituating ourselves to using the kiosk instead of making some
    >prints "when I get around to it"... would cure that: we'd get
    >prints, and they'd be long-lasting prints... Maybe even load up a
    >CF or SD card with the selected pix and let somebody else make
    >the trip to the drug store....


    Walgreen's, and other drug stores around, allow you to upload the
    images from your home and pick up the prints that day or the next day.
    They recently had a 10 cents a print special for 20 or more prints.

    I print a lot of my stuff at home on an Epson, but it takes too long
    to print 20 or 30 images when I'm sending out family snaps to
    relatives.


    --

    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Jan 26, 2008
    #14
  15. (PeteCresswell)

    N Guest

    "tony cooper" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > I just sent one of those drugstore 4 x 6 albums to my brother in
    > Denmark. There were 64 4 x 6's of shots of the family in 2007. I
    > uploaded the 64 images to Walgreen's website, picked up the prints the
    > next morning, and paid $6.40 plus sales tax.
    >
    > The postage to Denmark was more than the cost of the album and prints.
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida



    Why didn't you upload the pictures to a Danish printer?
     
    N, Jan 27, 2008
    #15
  16. (PeteCresswell)

    Pudentame Guest

    Rita Berkowitz wrote:
    > Pudentame wrote:
    >
    >>>> Don't hear much about them any more.
    >>>
    >>> They are still alive and kicking.
    >>>
    >>> <http://www.office.xerox.com/index/enus.html>
    >>>

    >>
    >> If you're looking for something a little less substantial, something
    >> that won't require $300 in materials every time you turn it on, you
    >> might look at Kodak's line of dye sublimation wax-thermal printers.

    >
    > Thanks for the tip. I've already been there. Dye subs are pretty cool,
    > but
    > can be very costly per print depending on what size prints one makes, just
    > look at the print pattern on the spent roll. For my low volume needs I
    > have
    > abandoned all in-home high-end printing and farm it out. It's cheaper,
    > less
    > maintenance, easier, and less time consuming. I use a decent local printer
    > that takes care of all my printing needs and if there is a mistake or
    > damaged print they will reprint for free.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Rita
    >


    What I'm currently doing most of my printing on ...

    http://wwwtr.kodak.com/TR/images/tr/consumer/miniLabSystem3300.jpg
     
    Pudentame, Jan 27, 2008
    #16
  17. (PeteCresswell)

    Pete D Guest

    "N" <> wrote in message
    news:479bcd5a$0$9761$...
    > "tony cooper" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >>
    >> I just sent one of those drugstore 4 x 6 albums to my brother in
    >> Denmark. There were 64 4 x 6's of shots of the family in 2007. I
    >> uploaded the 64 images to Walgreen's website, picked up the prints the
    >> next morning, and paid $6.40 plus sales tax.
    >>
    >> The postage to Denmark was more than the cost of the album and prints.
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >>
    >> Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida

    >
    >
    > Why didn't you upload the pictures to a Danish printer?
    >


    My thoughts exactly!
     
    Pete D, Jan 27, 2008
    #17
  18. Per tony cooper:
    >I print a lot of my stuff at home on an Epson, but it takes too long
    >to print 20 or 30 images when I'm sending out family snaps to
    >relatives.


    Might the el-cheapo printers/ink I use - but my experience is
    that the pix also fade badly within a year or so.

    OTOH, I've got perfectly-serviceable prints from 40+ years ago
    made by whatever the commercial process is/was.
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
    (PeteCresswell), Jan 27, 2008
    #18
  19. (PeteCresswell)

    tony cooper Guest

    On Sun, 27 Jan 2008 11:16:25 +1100, "N" <> wrote:

    >"tony cooper" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >>
    >> I just sent one of those drugstore 4 x 6 albums to my brother in
    >> Denmark. There were 64 4 x 6's of shots of the family in 2007. I
    >> uploaded the 64 images to Walgreen's website, picked up the prints the
    >> next morning, and paid $6.40 plus sales tax.
    >>
    >> The postage to Denmark was more than the cost of the album and prints.
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >>
    >> Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida

    >
    >
    >Why didn't you upload the pictures to a Danish printer?


    Several reasons. I like to see the prints. I wanted to present them
    in an album. I included some handwritten notes. I don't know the
    neighborhoods well enough to know how convenient any shop over there
    is. And, mostly, it doesn't seem very classy to say "Here's some pix.
    You go get 'em."

    If the easiest and cheapest alternative was a consideration, I could
    have uploaded them and him view online or print them himself.

    For $13, I'll pop for postage.



    --

    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Jan 27, 2008
    #19

  20. >
    > Walgreen's, and other drug stores around, allow you to upload the
    > images from your home and pick up the prints that day or the next day.
    > They recently had a 10 cents a print special for 20 or more prints.
    >
    >


    But the Walgreen's around here won;t print what you send them.
    It's impossible. They apply "levels" to the image so that it runs from
    0 to 255 intensity.

    CVS will print what you send, but the nearest store has a printer
    that screws around with yellows! The farthest CVS will print what you
    send, and turn out OK.

    What a pain.

    Doug McDonald
     
    Doug McDonald, Jan 27, 2008
    #20
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