Water Damage Info!

Discussion in 'A+ Certification' started by Yummy, Sep 12, 2003.

  1. Yummy

    Yummy Guest

    One of my clients roofs colapsed tonight from heavy rains. About 10-15
    PC's plus possibly network equipment may have damage. I can't get into
    the building till its been cleared by engineers.

    While I'm waiting, what is the success rate of restoring the PC's, and
    what is the best way of going about it?

    Yummy
     
    Yummy, Sep 12, 2003
    #1
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  2. Yummy

    RussS Guest

    I strongly suggest insurance replacing them completely. I have seen water
    damage many times where the ,achine is brought back to life successfully
    only to fail 3 months or more down the line. Water has many minerals and
    chemicals in it that can eat away at the MoBo or etching on the CPU in a way
    that is virtually invisible to the eye.
    Your client may thank you initially, but will abuse the heck out of you if
    6-9 mths later many of their machines have died and there is no insurance on
    them. As Clint Eastwood says - Do ya feel lucky?
     
    RussS, Sep 12, 2003
    #2
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  3. On Fri, 12 Sep 2003 03:17:24 GMT, Yummy
    <> wrote:

    >One of my clients roofs colapsed tonight from heavy rains. About 10-15
    >PC's plus possibly network equipment may have damage. I can't get into
    >the building till its been cleared by engineers.
    >
    >While I'm waiting, what is the success rate of restoring the PC's, and
    >what is the best way of going about it?
    >
    >Yummy


    It's very difficult to say from a distance, but I will say that, in my
    experience, water damage, especially with whatever minerals may have
    been present in the water from the contact with the roof, etc, is
    potentially catastrophic, short, medium and long-term, to any
    electronics. We would not guarantee any water damage repair we did,
    and that was told to customers up-front. Any residue at all left on a
    circuit board has the capability of etching/eroding component leads
    and circuit traces that aren't protected, and when the power is there
    the problems are worse.

    The approach we took to cleaning up any repair like this was a
    toothbrush or similar and alcohol. There are other commercial cleaning
    products as well.

    This is going to depend on how much water got at the equipment, how
    long the exposure was, whether the equipment was on or off, etc.
    Monitors should be taken to a TV/monitor repair shop without an
    attempt being made to turn them on, to be "hosed down" with alcohol,
    or whatever that shop uses (the vent holes make them certain victims
    of water damage). PC's should be examined very closely, and dealt with
    accordingly. It is possible that the PC's themselves, if on desks
    rather than the floor, have sustained minimal damage. Any in-line
    power supply that is not sealed (for example, with a detachable AC
    cord), should probably be thrown away, or at least tested rigourously.

    You may want to float this by the good folks at

    sci.electronics.repair

    after you have assessed the situation. Good luck. :)

    Tom
     
    Tom MacIntyre, Sep 12, 2003
    #3
  4. Yummy

    Ghost Guest

    In article <>, Navin R. Johnson
    <> wrote:

    > On Fri, 12 Sep 2003 03:17:24 GMT, Yummy
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >One of my clients roofs colapsed tonight from heavy rains. About 10-15
    > >PC's plus possibly network equipment may have damage. I can't get into
    > >the building till its been cleared by engineers.
    > >
    > >While I'm waiting, what is the success rate of restoring the PC's, and
    > >what is the best way of going about it?
    > >
    > >Yummy

    >
    > You'll definitely want to recommend total replacement, especially if the
    > equipment stayed wet for an extended period. Make a list of all the
    > damaged items, with replacement costs, so the client can submit it to
    > their insurance company. As for data recovery, all the hard drives
    > should be removed ASAP then thoroughly rinsed with distilled water.
    > Afterwards, hang them up and let a fan blow on them overnight. You
    > should be able to get them all running again to retrieve their data.


    err... do *NOT* rinse the HDD in any water whatsoever!!!

    If the roof collapse and the PCs got wet- big deal- replace them. The HDD
    likely did not get wet- or if they did, probably not too bad considering
    their location inside a PC. By rinsing them off (thereby concentrating
    water on them), you WILL contaminate them- remember they have breathing
    holes which will allow water- distilled or otherwise- to get inside. That
    will destroy the platters and data recovery will likely not be possible
    after that. If there is even microsocopic surface corrosion, the data
    will be irretrievable.

    Navin, even if you were successful in the past with rinsing HDDs, I would
    call that blind luck! It is not something I would try. In fact, I might
    try an experiment though- I might take a few of the dead drives we have
    laying around and try a few things with those- just to see how fast the
    platters visibly corrode.




    >
    > I had exactly the same scenario with one of my customers about a year
    > ago. Their insurance company accepted my damage list and repair
    > estimates and paid the entire cost - I even added extra charges for
    > overtime emergency service and all the time spent checking out the
    > damaged equipment. That was the single largest check I deposited in all
    > my 13 years of PC service - over 27K$ - and about half of it was for my
    > labor. ;-)


    Wouldnt it be nice if ALL our checks for 27k!!! lol

    My largest was for a re-networking job and that bill was for about 58k I think.

    I need to get a few more of those.. lol
     
    Ghost, Sep 13, 2003
    #4
  5. Yummy

    Ghost Guest

    In article <>,
    wrote:

    > On Fri, 12 Sep 2003 03:17:24 GMT, Yummy
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >One of my clients roofs colapsed tonight from heavy rains. About 10-15
    > >PC's plus possibly network equipment may have damage. I can't get into
    > >the building till its been cleared by engineers.
    > >
    > >While I'm waiting, what is the success rate of restoring the PC's, and
    > >what is the best way of going about it?
    > >
    > >Yummy

    >
    > It's very difficult to say from a distance, but I will say that, in my
    > experience, water damage, especially with whatever minerals may have
    > been present in the water from the contact with the roof, etc, is
    > potentially catastrophic, short, medium and long-term, to any
    > electronics. We would not guarantee any water damage repair we did,
    > and that was told to customers up-front. Any residue at all left on a
    > circuit board has the capability of etching/eroding component leads
    > and circuit traces that aren't protected, and when the power is there
    > the problems are worse.
    >
    > The approach we took to cleaning up any repair like this was a
    > toothbrush or similar and alcohol. There are other commercial cleaning
    > products as well.
    >
    > This is going to depend on how much water got at the equipment, how
    > long the exposure was, whether the equipment was on or off, etc.
    > Monitors should be taken to a TV/monitor repair shop without an
    > attempt being made to turn them on, to be "hosed down" with alcohol,
    > or whatever that shop uses (the vent holes make them certain victims
    > of water damage). PC's should be examined very closely, and dealt with
    > accordingly. It is possible that the PC's themselves, if on desks
    > rather than the floor, have sustained minimal damage. Any in-line
    > power supply that is not sealed (for example, with a detachable AC
    > cord), should probably be thrown away, or at least tested rigourously.
    >
    > You may want to float this by the good folks at
    >
    > sci.electronics.repair
    >
    > after you have assessed the situation. Good luck. :)
    >
    > Tom


    "float"????
     
    Ghost, Sep 13, 2003
    #5
  6. Yummy

    Ghost Guest

    In article <>, Navin R. Johnson
    <> wrote:

    > On Sat, 13 Sep 2003 02:50:21 GMT, (Ghost) wrote:
    >
    > >snip

    >
    > >err... do *NOT* rinse the HDD in any water whatsoever!!!
    > >
    > >If the roof collapse and the PCs got wet- big deal- replace them. The HDD
    > >likely did not get wet- or if they did, probably not too bad considering
    > >their location inside a PC. By rinsing them off (thereby concentrating
    > >water on them), you WILL contaminate them- remember they have breathing
    > >holes which will allow water- distilled or otherwise- to get inside. That
    > >will destroy the platters and data recovery will likely not be possible
    > >after that. If there is even microsocopic surface corrosion, the data
    > >will be irretrievable.
    > >
    > >Navin, even if you were successful in the past with rinsing HDDs, I would
    > >call that blind luck! It is not something I would try. In fact, I might
    > >try an experiment though- I might take a few of the dead drives we have
    > >laying around and try a few things with those- just to see how fast the
    > >platters visibly corrode.
    > >

    >
    > Very successful - in fact 100% data recovery from 16 wet hard drives.
    > The water that flooded the place was very muddy and the drives were
    > totally submerged in it for at least a few hours. The breather holes
    > were all clogged with mud and anyway, there's a filter that should have
    > kept any water or mud out - and apparently it did. My thinking was that
    > the mud and silt could have shorted something on the controller board
    > and since the drives were already soaked it couldn't hurt them anymore
    > to rinse them off. I guess it didn't. One more thing, I did sneak one of
    > the 'wet' drives out before the insurance company came to inventory and
    > collect the damaged equipment. It was a 60GB Maxtor DiamondMax and it's
    > still running right now in one of my test systems.... Go figure.
    >
    > NRJ
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "Very funny Scotty..... Now beam down my clothes!"


    Navin,

    I will have to bow to that experience... It seems incredible that was
    even possible.

    All I can say is.. "WOW"...
     
    Ghost, Sep 13, 2003
    #6
  7. On Sat, 13 Sep 2003 02:51:26 GMT, (Ghost) wrote:

    >In article <>,
    > wrote:
    >
    >> On Fri, 12 Sep 2003 03:17:24 GMT, Yummy
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >> >One of my clients roofs colapsed tonight from heavy rains. About 10-15
    >> >PC's plus possibly network equipment may have damage. I can't get into
    >> >the building till its been cleared by engineers.
    >> >
    >> >While I'm waiting, what is the success rate of restoring the PC's, and
    >> >what is the best way of going about it?
    >> >
    >> >Yummy

    >>
    >> It's very difficult to say from a distance, but I will say that, in my
    >> experience, water damage, especially with whatever minerals may have
    >> been present in the water from the contact with the roof, etc, is
    >> potentially catastrophic, short, medium and long-term, to any
    >> electronics. We would not guarantee any water damage repair we did,
    >> and that was told to customers up-front. Any residue at all left on a
    >> circuit board has the capability of etching/eroding component leads
    >> and circuit traces that aren't protected, and when the power is there
    >> the problems are worse.
    >>
    >> The approach we took to cleaning up any repair like this was a
    >> toothbrush or similar and alcohol. There are other commercial cleaning
    >> products as well.
    >>
    >> This is going to depend on how much water got at the equipment, how
    >> long the exposure was, whether the equipment was on or off, etc.
    >> Monitors should be taken to a TV/monitor repair shop without an
    >> attempt being made to turn them on, to be "hosed down" with alcohol,
    >> or whatever that shop uses (the vent holes make them certain victims
    >> of water damage). PC's should be examined very closely, and dealt with
    >> accordingly. It is possible that the PC's themselves, if on desks
    >> rather than the floor, have sustained minimal damage. Any in-line
    >> power supply that is not sealed (for example, with a detachable AC
    >> cord), should probably be thrown away, or at least tested rigourously.
    >>
    >> You may want to float this by the good folks at
    >>
    >> sci.electronics.repair
    >>
    >> after you have assessed the situation. Good luck. :)
    >>
    >> Tom

    >
    >"float"????


    Jeez...as a recognized PITA punster by friends, family, and
    co-workers, you'd think I'd have noticed what I had typed. Good catch!
    :)

    Tom
     
    Tom MacIntyre, Sep 13, 2003
    #7
  8. Yummy

    Yummy Guest

    Mmmm puns.

    I already know the monitors are shot because they were left on. Some
    have nice little black streaks coming from the vent holes and the
    smell of burnt band-aids. Some of the PC's were left on, I'll check
    them but I'm pretty sure their "toast". As far as retrieving data, It
    doesn't matter. All apps and data were stored on the server, which
    wasn't damaged. Most of the users are good about using their mapped
    user folders. If they had important data on their HD's, tough sh*t.
    They were warned several times before about potential disasters. All
    of the PC's were on the floor, so all got wet. I will be throwing away
    all power cords, keyboards, mice, speakers, and surge protectors.

    I am going to try to restore at least one PC. If I have success, I'll
    try others. Someone told me to wash all parts in distilled water and
    then bake them in an oven, but I'm afraid I would melt or warp the
    boards. Has anyone tried that instead of letting the parts sit in the
    sun?

    As far as network backbone stuff, the central patch panel is shot, the
    keystones are already starting to corrode. The hubs and switches are
    also shot as they were on and water seeped into the vents. Also, the
    drops at each PC seem OK, for now. It looks like none of the Cat5 runs
    are damaged, however a fiber bridge between buidings was damaged. Not
    my area, though.

    Also, a laser printer got wet. It's a brand new Samsung, one of those
    $800 ones. Of course it was on (sleep mode), but I haven't checked it
    yet. If it was an HP, I would take it apart to try to restore it.

    I would like to thank Mother Nature and stupid roofers for forcing a
    much needed upgrade, and padding my pocket book also!

    Yummy

    "Wow, what a nice set!"


    On Sat, 13 Sep 2003 21:47:32 GMT, Tom MacIntyre
    <> wrote:

    >On Sat, 13 Sep 2003 02:51:26 GMT, (Ghost) wrote:
    >
    >>In article <>,
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Fri, 12 Sep 2003 03:17:24 GMT, Yummy
    >>> <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>> >One of my clients roofs colapsed tonight from heavy rains. About 10-15
    >>> >PC's plus possibly network equipment may have damage. I can't get into
    >>> >the building till its been cleared by engineers.
    >>> >
    >>> >While I'm waiting, what is the success rate of restoring the PC's, and
    >>> >what is the best way of going about it?
    >>> >
    >>> >Yummy
    >>>
    >>> It's very difficult to say from a distance, but I will say that, in my
    >>> experience, water damage, especially with whatever minerals may have
    >>> been present in the water from the contact with the roof, etc, is
    >>> potentially catastrophic, short, medium and long-term, to any
    >>> electronics. We would not guarantee any water damage repair we did,
    >>> and that was told to customers up-front. Any residue at all left on a
    >>> circuit board has the capability of etching/eroding component leads
    >>> and circuit traces that aren't protected, and when the power is there
    >>> the problems are worse.
    >>>
    >>> The approach we took to cleaning up any repair like this was a
    >>> toothbrush or similar and alcohol. There are other commercial cleaning
    >>> products as well.
    >>>
    >>> This is going to depend on how much water got at the equipment, how
    >>> long the exposure was, whether the equipment was on or off, etc.
    >>> Monitors should be taken to a TV/monitor repair shop without an
    >>> attempt being made to turn them on, to be "hosed down" with alcohol,
    >>> or whatever that shop uses (the vent holes make them certain victims
    >>> of water damage). PC's should be examined very closely, and dealt with
    >>> accordingly. It is possible that the PC's themselves, if on desks
    >>> rather than the floor, have sustained minimal damage. Any in-line
    >>> power supply that is not sealed (for example, with a detachable AC
    >>> cord), should probably be thrown away, or at least tested rigourously.
    >>>
    >>> You may want to float this by the good folks at
    >>>
    >>> sci.electronics.repair
    >>>
    >>> after you have assessed the situation. Good luck. :)
    >>>
    >>> Tom

    >>
    >>"float"????

    >
    >Jeez...as a recognized PITA punster by friends, family, and
    >co-workers, you'd think I'd have noticed what I had typed. Good catch!
    > :)
    >
    >Tom
     
    Yummy, Sep 14, 2003
    #8
  9. Yummy

    natural_4u Guest

    I was also thinking the same thing about the HDD not getting wet considering
    the location of the HDD.

    I guess it would be a different story if there was a flood and the PCs were
    on the floor.


    "Ghost" <> wrote in message
    news:user-1209032250210001@1.0.0.101...
    > In article <>, Navin R. Johnson
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > > On Fri, 12 Sep 2003 03:17:24 GMT, Yummy
    > > <> wrote:
    > >
    > > >One of my clients roofs colapsed tonight from heavy rains. About 10-15
    > > >PC's plus possibly network equipment may have damage. I can't get into
    > > >the building till its been cleared by engineers.
    > > >
    > > >While I'm waiting, what is the success rate of restoring the PC's, and
    > > >what is the best way of going about it?
    > > >
    > > >Yummy

    > >
    > > You'll definitely want to recommend total replacement, especially if the
    > > equipment stayed wet for an extended period. Make a list of all the
    > > damaged items, with replacement costs, so the client can submit it to
    > > their insurance company. As for data recovery, all the hard drives
    > > should be removed ASAP then thoroughly rinsed with distilled water.
    > > Afterwards, hang them up and let a fan blow on them overnight. You
    > > should be able to get them all running again to retrieve their data.

    >
    > err... do *NOT* rinse the HDD in any water whatsoever!!!
    >
    > If the roof collapse and the PCs got wet- big deal- replace them. The HDD
    > likely did not get wet- or if they did, probably not too bad considering
    > their location inside a PC. By rinsing them off (thereby concentrating
    > water on them), you WILL contaminate them- remember they have breathing
    > holes which will allow water- distilled or otherwise- to get inside. That
    > will destroy the platters and data recovery will likely not be possible
    > after that. If there is even microsocopic surface corrosion, the data
    > will be irretrievable.
    >
    > Navin, even if you were successful in the past with rinsing HDDs, I would
    > call that blind luck! It is not something I would try. In fact, I might
    > try an experiment though- I might take a few of the dead drives we have
    > laying around and try a few things with those- just to see how fast the
    > platters visibly corrode.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > >
    > > I had exactly the same scenario with one of my customers about a year
    > > ago. Their insurance company accepted my damage list and repair
    > > estimates and paid the entire cost - I even added extra charges for
    > > overtime emergency service and all the time spent checking out the
    > > damaged equipment. That was the single largest check I deposited in all
    > > my 13 years of PC service - over 27K$ - and about half of it was for my
    > > labor. ;-)

    >
    > Wouldnt it be nice if ALL our checks for 27k!!! lol
    >
    > My largest was for a re-networking job and that bill was for about 58k I

    think.
    >
    > I need to get a few more of those.. lol
     
    natural_4u, Sep 14, 2003
    #9
  10. On Sun, 14 Sep 2003 07:25:58 GMT, Yummy
    <> wrote:

    >Mmmm puns.
    >
    >I already know the monitors are shot because they were left on. Some
    >have nice little black streaks coming from the vent holes and the
    >smell of burnt band-aids. Some of the PC's were left on, I'll check
    >them but I'm pretty sure their "toast". As far as retrieving data, It
    >doesn't matter. All apps and data were stored on the server, which
    >wasn't damaged. Most of the users are good about using their mapped
    >user folders. If they had important data on their HD's, tough sh*t.
    >They were warned several times before about potential disasters. All
    >of the PC's were on the floor, so all got wet. I will be throwing away
    >all power cords, keyboards, mice, speakers, and surge protectors.
    >
    >I am going to try to restore at least one PC. If I have success, I'll
    >try others. Someone told me to wash all parts in distilled water and
    >then bake them in an oven, but I'm afraid I would melt or warp the
    >boards. Has anyone tried that instead of letting the parts sit in the
    >sun?


    I have also heard of this as a viable option. Water is a
    non-conductor; it is the various trace elements in water that causes
    the problems. Time is not on your side now, though, as the original
    water+ damage is several days old.

    Tom

    >
    >As far as network backbone stuff, the central patch panel is shot, the
    >keystones are already starting to corrode. The hubs and switches are
    >also shot as they were on and water seeped into the vents. Also, the
    >drops at each PC seem OK, for now. It looks like none of the Cat5 runs
    >are damaged, however a fiber bridge between buidings was damaged. Not
    >my area, though.
    >
    >Also, a laser printer got wet. It's a brand new Samsung, one of those
    >$800 ones. Of course it was on (sleep mode), but I haven't checked it
    >yet. If it was an HP, I would take it apart to try to restore it.
    >
    >I would like to thank Mother Nature and stupid roofers for forcing a
    >much needed upgrade, and padding my pocket book also!
    >
    >Yummy
    >
    >"Wow, what a nice set!"
    >
    >
    >On Sat, 13 Sep 2003 21:47:32 GMT, Tom MacIntyre
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>On Sat, 13 Sep 2003 02:51:26 GMT, (Ghost) wrote:
    >>
    >>>In article <>,
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On Fri, 12 Sep 2003 03:17:24 GMT, Yummy
    >>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>> >One of my clients roofs colapsed tonight from heavy rains. About 10-15
    >>>> >PC's plus possibly network equipment may have damage. I can't get into
    >>>> >the building till its been cleared by engineers.
    >>>> >
    >>>> >While I'm waiting, what is the success rate of restoring the PC's, and
    >>>> >what is the best way of going about it?
    >>>> >
    >>>> >Yummy
    >>>>
    >>>> It's very difficult to say from a distance, but I will say that, in my
    >>>> experience, water damage, especially with whatever minerals may have
    >>>> been present in the water from the contact with the roof, etc, is
    >>>> potentially catastrophic, short, medium and long-term, to any
    >>>> electronics. We would not guarantee any water damage repair we did,
    >>>> and that was told to customers up-front. Any residue at all left on a
    >>>> circuit board has the capability of etching/eroding component leads
    >>>> and circuit traces that aren't protected, and when the power is there
    >>>> the problems are worse.
    >>>>
    >>>> The approach we took to cleaning up any repair like this was a
    >>>> toothbrush or similar and alcohol. There are other commercial cleaning
    >>>> products as well.
    >>>>
    >>>> This is going to depend on how much water got at the equipment, how
    >>>> long the exposure was, whether the equipment was on or off, etc.
    >>>> Monitors should be taken to a TV/monitor repair shop without an
    >>>> attempt being made to turn them on, to be "hosed down" with alcohol,
    >>>> or whatever that shop uses (the vent holes make them certain victims
    >>>> of water damage). PC's should be examined very closely, and dealt with
    >>>> accordingly. It is possible that the PC's themselves, if on desks
    >>>> rather than the floor, have sustained minimal damage. Any in-line
    >>>> power supply that is not sealed (for example, with a detachable AC
    >>>> cord), should probably be thrown away, or at least tested rigourously.
    >>>>
    >>>> You may want to float this by the good folks at
    >>>>
    >>>> sci.electronics.repair
    >>>>
    >>>> after you have assessed the situation. Good luck. :)
    >>>>
    >>>> Tom
    >>>
    >>>"float"????

    >>
    >>Jeez...as a recognized PITA punster by friends, family, and
    >>co-workers, you'd think I'd have noticed what I had typed. Good catch!
    >> :)
    >>
    >>Tom
     
    Tom MacIntyre, Sep 14, 2003
    #10
  11. I'd go a bit further: It's quite possible that no water ever got inside
    the PCs, at all.

    These PC's were not immersed, and the case covers MAY have kept all of
    the water out. Most PC cases have one single solid sheet of metal for
    the top, and sometimes one piece for 3 sides. Certainly the
    conservative approach is to replace them, but I'd at least look them
    over before doing that, if there is NO water inside them, I'd be
    inclined to not replace them without some indication that it's
    necessary. However, I would get a statement from the insurance company
    that in return for not replacing them now, if problems develop in the
    future, they will be covered.

    Now for keyboards, laptops, monitors (with vent slots in the cover,
    well, those are entirely different situations. And if you do find water
    INSIDE the cases, then I'd revert to replacement.


    Ghost wrote:

    > In article <>, Navin R. Johnson
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>On Fri, 12 Sep 2003 03:17:24 GMT, Yummy
    >><> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>One of my clients roofs colapsed tonight from heavy rains. About 10-15
    >>>PC's plus possibly network equipment may have damage. I can't get into
    >>>the building till its been cleared by engineers.
    >>>
    >>>While I'm waiting, what is the success rate of restoring the PC's, and
    >>>what is the best way of going about it?
    >>>
    >>>Yummy

    >>
    >>You'll definitely want to recommend total replacement, especially if the
    >>equipment stayed wet for an extended period. Make a list of all the
    >>damaged items, with replacement costs, so the client can submit it to
    >>their insurance company. As for data recovery, all the hard drives
    >>should be removed ASAP then thoroughly rinsed with distilled water.
    >>Afterwards, hang them up and let a fan blow on them overnight. You
    >>should be able to get them all running again to retrieve their data.

    >
    >
    > err... do *NOT* rinse the HDD in any water whatsoever!!!
    >
    > If the roof collapse and the PCs got wet- big deal- replace them. The HDD
    > likely did not get wet- or if they did, probably not too bad considering
    > their location inside a PC. By rinsing them off (thereby concentrating
    > water on them), you WILL contaminate them- remember they have breathing
    > holes which will allow water- distilled or otherwise- to get inside. That
    > will destroy the platters and data recovery will likely not be possible
    > after that. If there is even microsocopic surface corrosion, the data
    > will be irretrievable.
    >
    > Navin, even if you were successful in the past with rinsing HDDs, I would
    > call that blind luck! It is not something I would try. In fact, I might
    > try an experiment though- I might take a few of the dead drives we have
    > laying around and try a few things with those- just to see how fast the
    > platters visibly corrode.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >>I had exactly the same scenario with one of my customers about a year
    >>ago. Their insurance company accepted my damage list and repair
    >>estimates and paid the entire cost - I even added extra charges for
    >>overtime emergency service and all the time spent checking out the
    >>damaged equipment. That was the single largest check I deposited in all
    >>my 13 years of PC service - over 27K$ - and about half of it was for my
    >>labor. ;-)

    >
    >
    > Wouldnt it be nice if ALL our checks for 27k!!! lol
    >
    > My largest was for a re-networking job and that bill was for about 58k I think.
    >
    > I need to get a few more of those.. lol
     
    Barry Watzman, Sep 15, 2003
    #11
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