WAP-PSK - rekeying interval

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by Robert M Jones, Aug 8, 2006.

  1. What is best advice regarding the rekeying interval for WAP-PSK? My ISP
    advises leaving this setting alone (it defaults to zero). What is best
    for an ordinary home network - I have one desktop wirelessly networked
    to the router, and one other machine ethernet wired to the router.
    Currently set up with WAP-PSK and a 63 character ASCII key.
    --
    Rev Robert M Jones, Wimborne Baptist Church, UK
    http://www.wimborne-baptist.org.uk
    Free trial of Mailwasher Pro - effective email spam filter - (commission
    goes to our partners in Bulgaria)
    http://fta.firetrust.com/index.cgi?id=420
     
    Robert M Jones, Aug 8, 2006
    #1
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  2. Hi

    Not sure what the ISP has to do with Wireless Encryption on your LAN.

    You set the Key, and if it works you let it Ride.

    If you have WPA + AES it is even better.

    Wireless Security - http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Security.html

    WEP, WPA, and the Future - http://www.ezlan.net/wpa_wep.html

    Jack (MVP-Networking).



    "Robert M Jones" <> wrote in message
    news:%23Lr3U%...
    > What is best advice regarding the rekeying interval for WAP-PSK? My ISP
    > advises leaving this setting alone (it defaults to zero). What is best for
    > an ordinary home network - I have one desktop wirelessly networked to the
    > router, and one other machine ethernet wired to the router. Currently set
    > up with WAP-PSK and a 63 character ASCII key.
    > --
    > Rev Robert M Jones, Wimborne Baptist Church, UK
    > http://www.wimborne-baptist.org.uk
    > Free trial of Mailwasher Pro - effective email spam filter - (commission
    > goes to our partners in Bulgaria)
    > http://fta.firetrust.com/index.cgi?id=420
     
    Jack \(MVP-Networking\)., Aug 8, 2006
    #2
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  3. Jack (MVP-Networking). wrote:
    > Hi
    >
    > Not sure what the ISP has to do with Wireless Encryption on your LAN.
    >
    > You set the Key, and if it works you let it Ride.
    >
    > If you have WPA + AES it is even better.
    >
    > Wireless Security - http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Security.html
    >
    > WEP, WPA, and the Future - http://www.ezlan.net/wpa_wep.html
    >
    > Jack (MVP-Networking).



    Thank you. The ISP sold me the router (which is configured for their
    service), and their WPA instructions suggest leaving the rekeying
    interval at 0.
    I have a working system, but was canvassing opinion on whether this was
    the best option with regard to security - I have no views on the subject
    as I am still learning about wireless and networks and certainly don't
    yet understand what the rekeying interval is about. I've read your links
    thank you,but they don't mention that issue although they were helpful
    nevertheless.
    Thanks anyway.

    --
    Rev Robert M Jones, Wimborne Baptist Church, UK
    http://www.wimborne-baptist.org.uk
    Free trial of Mailwasher Pro - effective email spam filter - (commission
    goes to our partners in Bulgaria)
    http://fta.firetrust.com/index.cgi?id=420
     
    Robert M Jones, Aug 8, 2006
    #3
  4. Robert M Jones

    Lem Guest

    Robert M Jones wrote:
    > What is best advice regarding the rekeying interval for WAP-PSK? My ISP
    > advises leaving this setting alone (it defaults to zero). What is best
    > for an ordinary home network - I have one desktop wirelessly networked
    > to the router, and one other machine ethernet wired to the router.
    > Currently set up with WAP-PSK and a 63 character ASCII key.


    It depends on how paranoid you are and what data you are trying to
    secure. It is my understanding that although WEP is rather easily
    cracked with tools available on the Internet, WPA-PSK is currently only
    attackable through brute force techniques (i.e., guessing the password).
    A long, complex, non-dictionary WPA password should be more than
    sufficient for a home wifi network. As Jack said WPA2 (WPA-AES) is even
    more secure because it uses a different encryption standard.

    Although periodically changing passwords theoretically increases
    security (e.g., if it takes 10 hours to brute force guess a password and
    you change it every hour, you increase the total time it takes to guess
    it), in practice, it's likely to decrease security because most human
    beings can't remember changing sequences of long, complex,
    non-dictionary passwords without some memory aid. As soon as you start
    writing the password down someplace (e.g., on a post-it stuck to the
    monitor) the potential for a security breach goes up.
     
    Lem, Aug 8, 2006
    #4
  5. Robert M Jones

    Lem Guest

    Lem wrote:
    > Robert M Jones wrote:
    >> What is best advice regarding the rekeying interval for WAP-PSK? My
    >> ISP advises leaving this setting alone (it defaults to zero). What is
    >> best for an ordinary home network - I have one desktop wirelessly
    >> networked to the router, and one other machine ethernet wired to the
    >> router. Currently set up with WAP-PSK and a 63 character ASCII key.

    >
    > It depends on how paranoid you are and what data you are trying to
    > secure. It is my understanding that although WEP is rather easily
    > cracked with tools available on the Internet, WPA-PSK is currently only
    > attackable through brute force techniques (i.e., guessing the password).
    > A long, complex, non-dictionary WPA password should be more than
    > sufficient for a home wifi network. As Jack said WPA2 (WPA-AES) is even
    > more secure because it uses a different encryption standard.
    >
    > Although periodically changing passwords theoretically increases
    > security (e.g., if it takes 10 hours to brute force guess a password and
    > you change it every hour, you increase the total time it takes to guess
    > it), in practice, it's likely to decrease security because most human
    > beings can't remember changing sequences of long, complex,
    > non-dictionary passwords without some memory aid. As soon as you start
    > writing the password down someplace (e.g., on a post-it stuck to the
    > monitor) the potential for a security breach goes up.



    Sorry, I mis-read your question. I stand by what I wrote about changing
    passwords, but "rekeying interval" for WPA-TKIP refers to the automatic
    rekeying (which is why it's called "Temporal Key Integrity Protocol").
    I agree with Jack. Leave it at the default.
     
    Lem, Aug 8, 2006
    #5
  6. Lem wrote:
    > Lem wrote:
    >> Robert M Jones wrote:
    >>> What is best advice regarding the rekeying interval for WAP-PSK? My
    >>> ISP advises leaving this setting alone (it defaults to zero). What is
    >>> best for an ordinary home network - I have one desktop wirelessly
    >>> networked to the router, and one other machine ethernet wired to the
    >>> router. Currently set up with WAP-PSK and a 63 character ASCII key.

    >>
    >> It depends on how paranoid you are and what data you are trying to
    >> secure. It is my understanding that although WEP is rather easily
    >> cracked with tools available on the Internet, WPA-PSK is currently
    >> only attackable through brute force techniques (i.e., guessing the
    >> password). A long, complex, non-dictionary WPA password should be
    >> more than sufficient for a home wifi network. As Jack said WPA2
    >> (WPA-AES) is even more secure because it uses a different encryption
    >> standard.
    >>
    >> Although periodically changing passwords theoretically increases
    >> security (e.g., if it takes 10 hours to brute force guess a password
    >> and you change it every hour, you increase the total time it takes to
    >> guess it), in practice, it's likely to decrease security because most
    >> human beings can't remember changing sequences of long, complex,
    >> non-dictionary passwords without some memory aid. As soon as you
    >> start writing the password down someplace (e.g., on a post-it stuck to
    >> the monitor) the potential for a security breach goes up.

    >
    >
    > Sorry, I mis-read your question. I stand by what I wrote about changing
    > passwords, but "rekeying interval" for WPA-TKIP refers to the automatic
    > rekeying (which is why it's called "Temporal Key Integrity Protocol"). I
    > agree with Jack. Leave it at the default.


    Thank you. I understand the rest - it was the rekeying interval I
    wanted. Thanks again.

    --
    Rev Robert M Jones, Wimborne Baptist Church, UK
    http://www.wimborne-baptist.org.uk
    Free trial of Mailwasher Pro - effective email spam filter - (commission
    goes to our partners in Bulgaria)
    http://fta.firetrust.com/index.cgi?id=420
     
    Robert M Jones, Aug 8, 2006
    #6
  7. Further to your discussion,

    I have set up a wireless network with WPA-PSK and was wondering if there was
    any way for windows to store the network profile and hence WPA key so that i
    don't have to manually enter it every time i turn the pc on.

    Thanks in advance for any help

    "Robert M Jones" wrote:

    > Lem wrote:
    > > Lem wrote:
    > >> Robert M Jones wrote:
    > >>> What is best advice regarding the rekeying interval for WAP-PSK? My
    > >>> ISP advises leaving this setting alone (it defaults to zero). What is
    > >>> best for an ordinary home network - I have one desktop wirelessly
    > >>> networked to the router, and one other machine ethernet wired to the
    > >>> router. Currently set up with WAP-PSK and a 63 character ASCII key.
    > >>
    > >> It depends on how paranoid you are and what data you are trying to
    > >> secure. It is my understanding that although WEP is rather easily
    > >> cracked with tools available on the Internet, WPA-PSK is currently
    > >> only attackable through brute force techniques (i.e., guessing the
    > >> password). A long, complex, non-dictionary WPA password should be
    > >> more than sufficient for a home wifi network. As Jack said WPA2
    > >> (WPA-AES) is even more secure because it uses a different encryption
    > >> standard.
    > >>
    > >> Although periodically changing passwords theoretically increases
    > >> security (e.g., if it takes 10 hours to brute force guess a password
    > >> and you change it every hour, you increase the total time it takes to
    > >> guess it), in practice, it's likely to decrease security because most
    > >> human beings can't remember changing sequences of long, complex,
    > >> non-dictionary passwords without some memory aid. As soon as you
    > >> start writing the password down someplace (e.g., on a post-it stuck to
    > >> the monitor) the potential for a security breach goes up.

    > >
    > >
    > > Sorry, I mis-read your question. I stand by what I wrote about changing
    > > passwords, but "rekeying interval" for WPA-TKIP refers to the automatic
    > > rekeying (which is why it's called "Temporal Key Integrity Protocol"). I
    > > agree with Jack. Leave it at the default.

    >
    > Thank you. I understand the rest - it was the rekeying interval I
    > wanted. Thanks again.
    >
    > --
    > Rev Robert M Jones, Wimborne Baptist Church, UK
    > http://www.wimborne-baptist.org.uk
    > Free trial of Mailwasher Pro - effective email spam filter - (commission
    > goes to our partners in Bulgaria)
    > http://fta.firetrust.com/index.cgi?id=420
    >
     
    =?Utf-8?B?bWNob3Nz?=, Nov 15, 2006
    #7
  8. Robert M Jones

    Gordon Guest

    "mchoss" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Further to your discussion,
    >
    > I have set up a wireless network with WPA-PSK and was wondering if there
    > was
    > any way for windows to store the network profile and hence WPA key so that
    > i
    > don't have to manually enter it every time i turn the pc on.
    >


    Go to Network Connections, right-click on the ireless Connection and choose
    Properties. You should see a tab called "Wireless Networks". Click on that,
    then go to the Properties button and add the WPA key there

    HTH
     
    Gordon, Nov 15, 2006
    #8
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