voucher

Discussion in 'A+ Certification' started by Raymond, Nov 11, 2003.

  1. Raymond

    Raymond Guest

    When I signed up to take the A+ exam there was mentioning of voucher, what
    exactly is voucher?

    Thanks
     
    Raymond, Nov 11, 2003
    #1
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  2. On Mon, 10 Nov 2003 20:20:45 -0600, "Raymond"
    <> wrote:

    >When I signed up to take the A+ exam there was mentioning of voucher, what
    >exactly is voucher?
    >
    >Thanks


    Glenn put it well when he said that a voucher is a coupon. Instead of
    paying full price to an exam center, you purchase a voucher at a lower
    cost, then give the exam center the unique voucher number instead of
    payment. It's easy, and very worthwhile.

    If you're wondering how this is possible, here it is in a nutshell:
    companies who are CompTIA members can buy large numbers of vouchers at
    deep discounts, and many companies then resell them to the general
    public. Earlier this year, CompTIA began requiring that resellers
    package all vouchers with training materials of some sort; today, in
    addition to minor variations in price, you can select a voucher
    reseller on the basis of the quality of what you get *with* your
    vouchers.

    There are lots of choices out there, which you can find easily--either
    search the Web at large, or do a Google search on this newsgroup (as
    you can imagine, people talk about vouchers a lot here!). My personal
    suggestion (and as an employee, I'm biased) is to check out Total
    Seminars; with our vouchers, we include practice exam software with
    the same excellent test engine found on the CD in the back of Mike
    Meyers' All-In-One A+ Certification Exam Guide. You can find vouchers
    a few dollars cheaper, but for good practice exams and friendly
    service, check us out. But whatever you do ... don't pay full price
    for your A+ exams!

    Cheers,

    Cindy Clayton
    Total Seminars, LLC
    www.totalsem.com
    800-446-6004
     
    Cindy Clayton, Nov 14, 2003
    #2
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  3. Raymond

    blue Guest

    Ahhh, but therein lies the problem... at least with me it was.
    1. I didn't find out about vouchers until AFTER I purchased Mike's
    4th Edition, bundled with Chris Clayton's A+ Adapative book, on
    Amazon. So, there's 70 something dollars.
    2. It was only after I bought the book that I found out about the
    newgroup. (When you're going it alone, you stumble on this stuff)
    3. What am I to do then? Buy another study material, more money...
    I end up paying more for the material than the voucher saves me.

    Either that or I really wasn't paying attention.

    Luckily, my employer agreed to pay for half of everything, if I
    passed, which I did.

    Now, wouldn't it be nice to go to Amazon right now and see alongside
    Mike's book, something about vouchers? I just took a quick look and
    didn't see anything... course, I could have spent an hour there
    looking at every possible link.

    I bought the book about a year ago. Completely satisfied with it and
    consider it a reference... to keep!

    blue


    On Fri, 14 Nov 2003 16:03:48 GMT, (Cindy
    Clayton) wrote:

    >On Mon, 10 Nov 2003 20:20:45 -0600, "Raymond"
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>When I signed up to take the A+ exam there was mentioning of voucher, what
    >>exactly is voucher?
    >>
    >>Thanks

    >
    >Glenn put it well when he said that a voucher is a coupon. Instead of
    >paying full price to an exam center, you purchase a voucher at a lower
    >cost, then give the exam center the unique voucher number instead of
    >payment. It's easy, and very worthwhile.
    >
    >If you're wondering how this is possible, here it is in a nutshell:
    >companies who are CompTIA members can buy large numbers of vouchers at
    >deep discounts, and many companies then resell them to the general
    >public. Earlier this year, CompTIA began requiring that resellers
    >package all vouchers with training materials of some sort; today, in
    >addition to minor variations in price, you can select a voucher
    >reseller on the basis of the quality of what you get *with* your
    >vouchers.
    >
    >There are lots of choices out there, which you can find easily--either
    >search the Web at large, or do a Google search on this newsgroup (as
    >you can imagine, people talk about vouchers a lot here!). My personal
    >suggestion (and as an employee, I'm biased) is to check out Total
    >Seminars; with our vouchers, we include practice exam software with
    >the same excellent test engine found on the CD in the back of Mike
    >Meyers' All-In-One A+ Certification Exam Guide. You can find vouchers
    >a few dollars cheaper, but for good practice exams and friendly
    >service, check us out. But whatever you do ... don't pay full price
    >for your A+ exams!
    >
    >Cheers,
    >
    >Cindy Clayton
    >Total Seminars, LLC
    >www.totalsem.com
    >800-446-6004
     
    blue, Nov 15, 2003
    #3
  4. Raymond

    JesseTX Guest

    On Sat, 15 Nov 2003 03:44:24 GMT, (blue) wrote:

    >3. What am I to do then? Buy another study material, more money...
    >I end up paying more for the material than the voucher saves me.


    The voucher will always save you money. So even if it only saved you
    a dollar (it will save you a LOT more than that), it's worth it
    because the voucher comes with additional study material. You are
    looking at it like you must purchase additional study material and the
    study material comes with a voucher. But actually, it's the other way
    around.

    The non-discounted price for an exam is $145 ($290 for both exams).
    You can buy vouchers (which come with additional study material) for
    around $190 for two. So that discounts your price to about $95 per
    exam.

    There is no way you could ever end up paying more for the vouchers
    then they would save you. If you did, then no one would buy vouchers.
     
    JesseTX, Nov 15, 2003
    #4
  5. On Sat, 15 Nov 2003 03:44:24 GMT, (blue) wrote:

    >Ahhh, but therein lies the problem... at least with me it was.
    >1. I didn't find out about vouchers until AFTER I purchased Mike's
    >4th Edition, bundled with Chris Clayton's A+ Adapative book, on
    >Amazon. So, there's 70 something dollars.
    >2. It was only after I bought the book that I found out about the
    >newgroup. (When you're going it alone, you stumble on this stuff)
    >3. What am I to do then? Buy another study material, more money...
    >I end up paying more for the material than the voucher saves me.



    Hi Blue,

    You shouldn't worry too much about paying a lot of $$ on top of the
    cost of vouchers because they're now bundled with training materials.

    First, I guarantee you that voucher prices are still quite a
    bargain--as Jesse pointed out, any savings is still a savings! And
    you'll find that the savings are indeed substantial.

    Second, the books you've bought (well, Mike's book for sure) aren't
    the kinds of training materials that are being offered as part of
    voucher bundles. CompTIA only requires that *some sort of training
    material* be included with the voucher(s), so as you can imagine, no
    one's throwing in big, heavy books that retail for upwards of US $40.

    Many companies bundle e-books that you download from their web sites,
    and/or practice exams of some type, and the quality of these materials
    varies greatly from one company to the next.

    What Total Seminars offers in its bundle is not Mike's book, and not
    the same bank of practice exams that are found in the back of the
    book--instead, it's an expanded set of practice exams, with hundreds
    more questions using the same software that closely simulates the
    actual test environment.

    The bottom line is that you haven't missed out on any voucher savings
    by having already bought your books. My advice is to go forth and
    study, then definitely get vouchers when it's time to take your exams.

    Best of luck,

    Cindy Clayton
    Total Seminars, LLC
    www.totalsem.com
     
    Cindy Clayton, Nov 21, 2003
    #5
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