VOIP over Wi-Fi subject to eavesdropping?

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by Steve, Aug 4, 2005.

  1. Steve

    Steve Guest

    I use VOIP (Voicepulse) over my laptop while on the road, connected via
    Wi-Fi hotspots.


    My question- Are my phone conversations secure over these connections?
    I am talking for "all practical purposes", absent CIA or KGB with
    advanced technology.

    THANKS!
     
    Steve, Aug 4, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. "Steve" <> wrote:
    >I use VOIP (Voicepulse) over my laptop while on the road, connected via
    >Wi-Fi hotspots.
    >
    >My question- Are my phone conversations secure over these connections?
    >I am talking for "all practical purposes", absent CIA or KGB with
    >advanced technology.


    Let me explain 10 important things about telephones to you...
    which comes from 34 years, before retiring, in the telephone
    long distance business.

    1) Do *not* *ever* say *anything* on a telephone that you cannot
    live with seeing on the front page of tomorrows local newspaper.

    (Items 2 through 9 have precisely the same words as item 1.)

    10) There is no such thing as a secure telephone connection,
    unless *you* provide the encryption at both ends.

    --
    Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
    Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska)
     
    Floyd L. Davidson, Aug 4, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Steve

    Unruh Guest

    (Floyd L. Davidson) writes:

    >"Steve" <> wrote:
    >>I use VOIP (Voicepulse) over my laptop while on the road, connected via
    >>Wi-Fi hotspots.
    >>
    >>My question- Are my phone conversations secure over these connections?
    >>I am talking for "all practical purposes", absent CIA or KGB with
    >>advanced technology.


    >Let me explain 10 important things about telephones to you...
    >which comes from 34 years, before retiring, in the telephone
    >long distance business.


    > 1) Do *not* *ever* say *anything* on a telephone that you cannot
    > live with seeing on the front page of tomorrows local newspaper.


    >(Items 2 through 9 have precisely the same words as item 1.)


    Since long range microphones are possible and bugs, I guess you should
    change this to " Never say anything ever anywhere [that you would not want
    to live to see published...].
    Or since your actions could be filmed anywhere, do not do anything....
    Or, the best way to cope with the uncertainties of life is to die.

    Not for most of us very helpful advice and certainly not an answer to his
    question.


    > 10) There is no such thing as a secure telephone connection,
    > unless *you* provide the encryption at both ends.


    Similarly.


    IF your VOIP is is not encrypted then yes it could be "overheard".
    If the wireless link from your laptop to the access point is not encrypted,
    then yes, it could be overheard. I have no idea if VoicePulse encrypts the
    stuff.
     
    Unruh, Aug 4, 2005
    #3
  4. Steve

    Chris Hills Guest

    In article <>, Floyd L. Davidson
    <> writes
    >"Steve" <> wrote:
    >>I use VOIP (Voicepulse) over my laptop while on the road, connected via
    >>Wi-Fi hotspots.
    >>
    >>My question- Are my phone conversations secure over these connections?
    >>I am talking for "all practical purposes", absent CIA or KGB with
    >>advanced technology.

    >
    >Let me explain 10 important things about telephones to you...
    >which comes from 34 years, before retiring, in the telephone
    >long distance business.
    >
    > 1) Do *not* *ever* say *anything* on a telephone that you cannot
    > live with seeing on the front page of tomorrows local newspaper.
    >
    >(Items 2 through 9 have precisely the same words as item 1.)
    >
    > 10) There is no such thing as a secure telephone connection,
    > unless *you* provide the encryption at both ends.
    >


    I assume that applies to the USA telephone system?

    --
    \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
    \/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/
    /\/\/ www.phaedsys.org \/\/\
    \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/
     
    Chris Hills, Aug 4, 2005
    #4
  5. Unruh <> wrote:
    > (Floyd L. Davidson) writes:
    >
    >>"Steve" <> wrote:
    >>>I use VOIP (Voicepulse) over my laptop while on the road, connected via
    >>>Wi-Fi hotspots.
    >>>
    >>>My question- Are my phone conversations secure over these connections?
    >>>I am talking for "all practical purposes", absent CIA or KGB with
    >>>advanced technology.

    >
    >>Let me explain 10 important things about telephones to you...
    >>which comes from 34 years, before retiring, in the telephone
    >>long distance business.

    >
    >> 1) Do *not* *ever* say *anything* on a telephone that you cannot
    >> live with seeing on the front page of tomorrows local newspaper.

    >
    >>(Items 2 through 9 have precisely the same words as item 1.)

    >
    >Since long range microphones are possible and bugs, I guess you should
    >change this to " Never say anything ever anywhere [that you would not want
    >to live to see published...].
    >Or since your actions could be filmed anywhere, do not do anything....
    >Or, the best way to cope with the uncertainties of life is to die.
    >
    >Not for most of us very helpful advice and certainly not an answer to his
    >question.


    *BULLSHIT*

    Let me repeat that in terms you might understand:

    Do not ever say anything on a telephone that you cannot live
    with seeing on the front page of tomorrow's local newspaper.

    You won't find anyone that has worked with the technical end of
    the industry that thinks differently (unless they are brain
    dead).

    >> 10) There is no such thing as a secure telephone connection,
    >> unless *you* provide the encryption at both ends.

    >
    >Similarly.
    >
    >IF your VOIP is is not encrypted then yes it could be "overheard".
    >If the wireless link from your laptop to the access point is not encrypted,
    >then yes, it could be overheard. I have no idea if VoicePulse encrypts the
    >stuff.


    So you are admitting it is exactly as I said. If *you* don't
    provide the encryption, it is *not* secure.

    And I *guarantee* you that on occasion there *are* people
    listening.

    --
    Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
    Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska)
     
    Floyd L. Davidson, Aug 4, 2005
    #5
  6. Chris Hills <> wrote:
    >In article <>, Floyd L. Davidson
    ><> writes
    >>"Steve" <> wrote:
    >>>I use VOIP (Voicepulse) over my laptop while on the road, connected via
    >>>Wi-Fi hotspots.
    >>>
    >>>My question- Are my phone conversations secure over these connections?
    >>>I am talking for "all practical purposes", absent CIA or KGB with
    >>>advanced technology.

    >>
    >>Let me explain 10 important things about telephones to you...
    >>which comes from 34 years, before retiring, in the telephone
    >>long distance business.
    >>
    >> 1) Do *not* *ever* say *anything* on a telephone that you cannot
    >> live with seeing on the front page of tomorrows local newspaper.
    >>
    >>(Items 2 through 9 have precisely the same words as item 1.)
    >>
    >> 10) There is no such thing as a secure telephone connection,
    >> unless *you* provide the encryption at both ends.
    >>

    >
    >I assume that applies to the USA telephone system?


    I would assume it applies to telephones everywhere in the world,
    though my experience was specifically in the US. Off hand I'd
    assume the security is worse in other places!

    You've perhaps never heard just how automatic switching came to
    exist in the telephone industry? Back in the good old days you
    picked up the transmitter, rang the line, and told the operator
    who to connect you to.

    Well a fellow named Almon Strowger was an undertaker in Kansas
    City, and he became convinced that the local telephone operator
    was "misdirecting" business calls to his competitor. The
    operator was the wife of the other undertaker in town! So he
    went to work on what he later called the "Girl-less Telephone".

    He spend a few years working on it, and in the early 1890's came
    out with the first automatic telephone switch, designed to get
    rid of that pesky telephone operator. A 1901 advertisement
    read:

    THIS SYSTEM OF TELEPHONING
    INSURES ABSOLUTE SECRECY

    --
    Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
    Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska)
     
    Floyd L. Davidson, Aug 4, 2005
    #6
  7. Steve

    CyberDroog Guest

    On Thu, 04 Aug 2005 02:23:01 -0800, (Floyd L. Davidson)
    wrote:

    >Do not ever say anything on a telephone that you cannot live
    >with seeing on the front page of tomorrow's local newspaper.


    This thread reminds me of the novel The Light of Other Days (Arthur C.
    Clarke and Stephen Baxter.)

    In the story, science creates a wormhole camera - a device that can open a
    stable wormhole at any location on the planet, or in the universe, and
    observe the goings on. That idea is uncomfortable enough; having to be
    worried that you can be on camera even while sitting on the pot with the
    door locked and no windows.

    Then one clever guy figures out that if the wormhole camera can be sent out
    to any location in space, even light-years away, then it stood to reason
    that it could be sent years, or eons, back in time also.

    At that point, people not only had to worry about being on camera at any
    given moment, but they also had to fret about the fact that any action they
    ever took in life could now be viewed, and there wasn't a thing they could
    do about it.

    Turned out to be great for proving beyond all doubt the guilt or innocence
    of people in prison. They instituted a policy by which any prisoner could
    request a wormhole examination of the crime for which he was convicted,
    provided he consented to an examination of the rest of his life to see if
    he committed any felonies for which he was suspected or accused, but never
    charged. That greatly reduced the number of requests.

    Solving previously unsolved crimes became a snap. Simply send a wormhole
    cam back to the approximate time of the crime, then sit and watch it
    happen.

    Current crimes, of course, dropped to nearly zero.

    Then the technology became affordable on the consumer level...

    It was bad enough pondering the idea of God remembering everything you have
    done... now we can imagine science saying "Hey, why not?"


    --
    PREHISTORIC, adj. Belonging to an early period and a museum. Antedating
    the art and practice of perpetuating falsehood.

    - Ambrose Bierce
     
    CyberDroog, Aug 4, 2005
    #7
  8. Steve

    CyberDroog Guest

    On Thu, 04 Aug 2005 02:42:39 -0800, (Floyd L. Davidson)
    wrote:

    >Well a fellow named Almon Strowger was an undertaker in Kansas
    >City, and he became convinced that the local telephone operator
    >was "misdirecting" business calls to his competitor. The
    >operator was the wife of the other undertaker in town! So he
    >went to work on what he later called the "Girl-less Telephone".


    Neat story regardless, but the part about the operator being the wife of
    his competitor is just weakly anecdotal and can't be verified. Other
    versions claim the operator was the cousin of a competitor, or that all the
    operators had conspired against him, suggesting bribery.

    It is pretty much accepted that Almon was reportedly a paranoid nut. Either
    way, nice going Almon!


    --
    At the core of liberalism is the spoiled child - miserable, as all spoiled
    children are, unsatisfied, demanding, ill-disciplined, despotic and
    useless. Liberalism is a philosphy of sniveling brats.

    - P.J. O'Rourke
     
    CyberDroog, Aug 4, 2005
    #8
  9. Steve

    GEO Guest

    On Thu, 04 Aug 2005 11:32:36 GMT, CyberDroog
    <> wrote:

    >On Thu, 04 Aug 2005 02:23:01 -0800, (Floyd L. Davidson)
    >wrote:
    >
    >>Do not ever say anything on a telephone that you cannot live
    >>with seeing on the front page of tomorrow's local newspaper.

    >
    >This thread reminds me of the novel The Light of Other Days (Arthur C.
    >Clarke and Stephen Baxter.)


    ......<snip>

    You might enjoy this short story:
    <http://members.net-tech.com.au/alaneb/unknown.html>

    Geo
     
    GEO , Aug 4, 2005
    #9
  10. CyberDroog <> wrote:
    >On Thu, 04 Aug 2005 02:42:39 -0800, (Floyd L. Davidson)
    >wrote:
    >
    >>Well a fellow named Almon Strowger was an undertaker in Kansas
    >>City, and he became convinced that the local telephone operator
    >>was "misdirecting" business calls to his competitor. The
    >>operator was the wife of the other undertaker in town! So he
    >>went to work on what he later called the "Girl-less Telephone".

    >
    >Neat story regardless, but the part about the operator being the wife of
    >his competitor is just weakly anecdotal and can't be verified. Other
    >versions claim the operator was the cousin of a competitor, or that all the
    >operators had conspired against him, suggesting bribery.


    Could be, but I've never seen *any* of those versions! The only
    variation that I've seen on it was whether he actually *knew*
    she was doing it at the time, or just suspected and only
    confirmed it much later.

    >It is pretty much accepted that Almon was reportedly a paranoid nut. Either
    >way, nice going Almon!


    Well, I don't know about "paranoid nut", but he was
    certainly a "little strange"!

    I mentioned that he called it the "Girl-less Telephone", but I
    left out the rest of the description. The whole bit was,
    "girl-less, cuss-less, out-of-order-less, wait-less" telephone.

    Obviously Almon had issues with the telephone company... But
    gee, a hundred years later and that would *still* describe about
    half the population in the US! (Maybe across the pond people
    love telephone companies, but that isn't generally the case
    here.)

    --
    Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
    Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska)
     
    Floyd L. Davidson, Aug 4, 2005
    #10
  11. CyberDroog <> wrote:
    >On Thu, 04 Aug 2005 02:23:01 -0800, (Floyd L. Davidson)
    >wrote:
    >
    >>Do not ever say anything on a telephone that you cannot live
    >>with seeing on the front page of tomorrow's local newspaper.

    >
    >This thread reminds me of the novel The Light of Other Days (Arthur C.
    >Clarke and Stephen Baxter.)
    >
    >In the story, science creates a wormhole camera - a device that can open a
    >stable wormhole at any location on the planet, or in the universe, and
    >observe the goings on. That idea is uncomfortable enough; having to be

    ....
    >Then the technology became affordable on the consumer level...
    >
    >It was bad enough pondering the idea of God remembering everything you have
    >done... now we can imagine science saying "Hey, why not?"


    Fascinating!

    Of course, I have to tell you that that reminds me of something too!

    Traditional Eskimo culture was based on almost exactly that
    concept! They didn't have wormholes, but something just about
    as good. *Everything* has a spirit. If you can conceive of its
    existence, it has a spirit. And of course all spirits have
    moral sensitivities, and act according to what they perceive
    humans are, or are not, doing by the rules.

    Hence as young Eskimos became adults they moved into a world
    that required them to be "aware". That is, aware that *every*
    thought, *every* word, and *every* action, would have an effect on
    the spirits of anything and everything involved. That effect
    would be directly responsible for how various spirits react
    towards all humans; hence, inappropriate actions could easily
    cause all of the resources needed by an entire village to
    disappear!

    Talk about big brother watching! Same thing as a wormhole,
    except it wasn't personal privacy that you might loose, but the
    lives of your entire family and everyone in the village.

    (I also believe that one of the distinctions between more and
    less violent societies is that those who have a single "God",
    can always either be forgiven or have God be on their side.
    Either way, it's do what's necessary and worry about the
    consequences later. As opposed to that, in cultures with
    multiple Gods a person cannot live long enough to round up
    forgiveness... so they learn to be more respectful first, and
    do not expect forgiveness later.)

    --
    Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
    Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska)
     
    Floyd L. Davidson, Aug 4, 2005
    #11
  12. On Wed, 03 Aug 2005 18:45:10 -0700, Steve wrote:


    > My question- Are my phone conversations secure over these connections?
    > I am talking for "all practical purposes", absent CIA or KGB with
    > advanced technology.


    If you are worried about the security of the link between
    your laptop and the Hotspot access point, you should use
    the strongest encryption supported by the system you are
    using. WPA is more secure than WEP, but only if you
    use a strong password/key. Because hotspots often have
    to cater for large numbers of users, many of them using
    older equipment, they usually need to use the weakest
    security options. WEP 40 bit key based on an easily
    guessed password like 'megalomart'.

    No calls made over the public telephone network can be considered
    secure. Some VOIP systems offer end to end encryption, which
    should result in a reasonably secure line. Skype claim to use
    strong encryption (AES 256 bit).

    http://www.tacticaltech.org/files/Skype_Security.pdf


    E.S.



    --
    Linux 2.6.12.1
    Remove 'X' to reply by e-mail.
     
    Eamon Skelton, Aug 4, 2005
    #12
  13. Steve

    Leythos Guest

    In article <>, says...
    > "Steve" <> wrote:
    > >I use VOIP (Voicepulse) over my laptop while on the road, connected via
    > >Wi-Fi hotspots.
    > >
    > >My question- Are my phone conversations secure over these connections?
    > >I am talking for "all practical purposes", absent CIA or KGB with
    > >advanced technology.

    >
    > Let me explain 10 important things about telephones to you...
    > which comes from 34 years, before retiring, in the telephone
    > long distance business.
    >
    > 1) Do *not* *ever* say *anything* on a telephone that you cannot
    > live with seeing on the front page of tomorrows local newspaper.
    >
    > (Items 2 through 9 have precisely the same words as item 1.)
    >
    > 10) There is no such thing as a secure telephone connection,
    > unless *you* provide the encryption at both ends.


    11) Never say anything in E-Mail or Usenet or other medium that you
    would not want to see in public/news/by your mother.

    --


    remove 999 in order to email me
     
    Leythos, Aug 4, 2005
    #13
  14. Steve

    Chris Hills Guest

    In article <>, Floyd L. Davidson
    <> writes
    >Chris Hills <> wrote:
    >>In article <>, Floyd L. Davidson
    >><> writes
    >>>"Steve" <> wrote:
    >>>>I use VOIP (Voicepulse) over my laptop while on the road, connected via
    >>>>Wi-Fi hotspots.
    >>>>
    >>>>My question- Are my phone conversations secure over these connections?
    >>>>I am talking for "all practical purposes", absent CIA or KGB with
    >>>>advanced technology.
    >>>
    >>>Let me explain 10 important things about telephones to you...
    >>>which comes from 34 years, before retiring, in the telephone
    >>>long distance business.
    >>>
    >>> 1) Do *not* *ever* say *anything* on a telephone that you cannot
    >>> live with seeing on the front page of tomorrows local newspaper.
    >>>
    >>>(Items 2 through 9 have precisely the same words as item 1.)
    >>>
    >>> 10) There is no such thing as a secure telephone connection,
    >>> unless *you* provide the encryption at both ends.
    >>>

    >>
    >>I assume that applies to the USA telephone system?

    >
    >I would assume it applies to telephones everywhere in the world,
    >though my experience was specifically in the US. Off hand I'd
    >assume the security is worse in other places!


    In some places yes, others no.

    >You've perhaps never heard just how automatic switching came to
    >exist in the telephone industry? Back in the good old days you


    Yes I know. I worked on System X and some of the call re-routing stuff
    for the special prefixes
    --
    \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
    \/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/
    /\/\/ www.phaedsys.org \/\/\
    \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/
     
    Chris Hills, Aug 4, 2005
    #14
  15. Steve

    NotMe Guest

    "Floyd L. Davidson"
    | >
    | >IF your VOIP is is not encrypted then yes it could be "overheard".
    | >If the wireless link from your laptop to the access point is not
    encrypted,
    | >then yes, it could be overheard. I have no idea if VoicePulse encrypts
    the
    | >stuff.
    |
    | So you are admitting it is exactly as I said. If *you* don't
    | provide the encryption, it is *not* secure.
    |
    | And I *guarantee* you that on occasion there *are* people
    | listening.

    Do not assume that if it is encrypted that at some point it will not be
    decrypted, either today, tomorrow or some n-th day after tomorrow.
     
    NotMe, Aug 4, 2005
    #15
  16. Steve

    NotMe Guest

    "Chris Hills"

    | >Let me explain 10 important things about telephones to you...
    | >which comes from 34 years, before retiring, in the telephone
    | >long distance business.
    | >
    | > 1) Do *not* *ever* say *anything* on a telephone that you cannot
    | > live with seeing on the front page of tomorrows local newspaper.
    | >
    | >(Items 2 through 9 have precisely the same words as item 1.)
    | >
    | > 10) There is no such thing as a secure telephone connection,
    | > unless *you* provide the encryption at both ends.
    | >
    |
    | I assume that applies to the USA telephone system?

    Two words: Patriot Act
     
    NotMe, Aug 4, 2005
    #16
  17. Steve

    Phil Fites Guest

    NotMe wrote:
    > "Chris Hills"
    >
    > | >Let me explain 10 important things about telephones to you...
    > | >which comes from 34 years, before retiring, in the telephone
    > | >long distance business.
    > | >
    > | > 1) Do *not* *ever* say *anything* on a telephone that you cannot
    > | > live with seeing on the front page of tomorrows local newspaper.
    > | >
    > | >(Items 2 through 9 have precisely the same words as item 1.)
    > | >
    > | > 10) There is no such thing as a secure telephone connection,
    > | > unless *you* provide the encryption at both ends.
    > | >
    > |
    > | I assume that applies to the USA telephone system?
    >
    > Two words: Patriot Act
    >
    >

    And one acronym: CALEA (US "wiretap" legislation that [VERY
    roughly] requires providers to be able to let law enforcement
    listen into anything. This preceded the Patriot Act.)

    If legalities interest you, you might also want to search on
    "Council of Europe Cybercrime". Among many other things, this
    applies to VoIP, if the relevant jurisdiction has signed and
    ratified the treaty.
     
    Phil Fites, Aug 4, 2005
    #17
  18. Leythos <> wrote:
    >In article <>, says...
    >>
    >> Let me explain 10 important things about telephones to you...
    >> which comes from 34 years, before retiring, in the telephone
    >> long distance business.
    >>
    >> 1) Do *not* *ever* say *anything* on a telephone that you cannot
    >> live with seeing on the front page of tomorrows local newspaper.
    >>
    >> (Items 2 through 9 have precisely the same words as item 1.)
    >>
    >> 10) There is no such thing as a secure telephone connection,
    >> unless *you* provide the encryption at both ends.

    >
    >11) Never say anything in E-Mail or Usenet or other medium that you
    >would not want to see in public/news/by your mother.


    Different list, so that should be item 1. However, you're not
    quite getting the picture (probably too young?).

    1) Don't post anything to Usenet that you don't want your
    *grandchildren* to see, because they probably will.

    You worry about what you mother will see... I'm amazed at what
    my grandchildren know about.

    --
    Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
    Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska)
     
    Floyd L. Davidson, Aug 5, 2005
    #18
  19. Steve

    Unruh Guest

    "NotMe" <> writes:

    >"Floyd L. Davidson"
    >| >
    >| >IF your VOIP is is not encrypted then yes it could be "overheard".
    >| >If the wireless link from your laptop to the access point is not
    >encrypted,
    >| >then yes, it could be overheard. I have no idea if VoicePulse encrypts
    >the
    >| >stuff.
    >|
    >| So you are admitting it is exactly as I said. If *you* don't
    >| provide the encryption, it is *not* secure.
    >|
    >| And I *guarantee* you that on occasion there *are* people
    >| listening.


    >Do not assume that if it is encrypted that at some point it will not be
    >decrypted, either today, tomorrow or some n-th day after tomorrow.


    And the conclusion anyone is to draw from this? /do not assume that time
    travel or mind reading cannot occur in the future. So what does that mean?
    One lives life rationally by examining alternatives and the liklihhod of
    them. One does not live by simply listing all possibilities no matter how
    outlandish and stopping at that point.
     
    Unruh, Aug 5, 2005
    #19
  20. Steve

    David Taylor Guest

    > And the conclusion anyone is to draw from this? /do not assume that time
    > travel or mind reading cannot occur in the future. So what does that mean?
    > One lives life rationally by examining alternatives and the liklihhod of
    > them. One does not live by simply listing all possibilities no matter how
    > outlandish and stopping at that point.


    Without wishing to get into the issue of what is possible now or in the
    future, capturing and playing back VoIP is NOW:-

    http://vomit.xtdnet.nl/
     
    David Taylor, Aug 5, 2005
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Samuel Townsend
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    639
    Samuel Townsend
    Oct 13, 2004
  2. Steve
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    423
    Marc Popek
    Nov 4, 2005
  3. Steve
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    406
    Steve
    Aug 4, 2005
  4. Steve
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    424
    Wolfgang S. Rupprecht
    Aug 4, 2005
  5. Theo Markettos

    VOIP over VPN over TCP over WAP over 3G

    Theo Markettos, Feb 3, 2008, in forum: UK VOIP
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    927
    Theo Markettos
    Feb 14, 2008
Loading...

Share This Page