Vodafone NZ there cable service is 100%

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Possible, Nov 21, 2013.

  1. Possible

    Possible Guest

    They fixed a system fault that stuffed up my cable link due to a
    corrupted profile with in 15mins of ringing them.

    Every thing at my end looked 100% but no network, Modem was showing
    100% as well, they had a system problem the night before, very slow
    Internet, seems that it corrupted my Profile..


    But then again they took over the utter Crap Ihug, been there done that
    the worse ISP I have ever had.

    Actrix yes great was set up by 2 Unix Uni chaps, I was on it in its
    first days, but a bit hard to interface with Windows as the news reader
    was Unix based..

    My advice is idiots should not use the Internet.


    Telecom Xtra, been there done that no way plus I have to pay toll calls
    to Wellington, Plus I think no one will be able to afford the Ultra Fast
    Broadband, and the very limited caps..
    Possible, Nov 21, 2013
    #1
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  2. Possible

    Crash Guest

    On Thu, 21 Nov 2013 18:59:32 +1300, Possible <> wrote:

    >
    >
    >They fixed a system fault that stuffed up my cable link due to a
    >corrupted profile with in 15mins of ringing them.
    >
    >Every thing at my end looked 100% but no network, Modem was showing
    >100% as well, they had a system problem the night before, very slow
    >Internet, seems that it corrupted my Profile..
    >

    Hmmm - looks like Roger but he does not usually post such lucid,
    positive remarks ;-)
    >
    >But then again they took over the utter Crap Ihug, been there done that
    >the worse ISP I have ever had.
    >

    Ahh the Crapmark. Another Roger 'nym then.

    >Actrix yes great was set up by 2 Unix Uni chaps, I was on it in its
    >first days, but a bit hard to interface with Windows as the news reader
    >was Unix based..
    >
    >My advice is idiots should not use the Internet.
    >

    No doubt now. Roger you are about 15 years too late - the idiots
    could afford the internet when ISPs started offering dial-up at $2.50
    per hour or $29.95 per month all-you-can-eat and PCs could be got for
    less than 3 grand with a modem and Windows 95/98 included.

    To keep the idiots out would have required $3000 PCs (512KB memory, 40
    MB disks) running MS- (or PC-)DOS and the internet costing $30 per
    hour for dial-up through the likes of CompuServe Pacific as the
    current status quo.
    >
    >Telecom Xtra, been there done that no way plus I have to pay toll calls
    >to Wellington, Plus I think no one will be able to afford the Ultra Fast
    >Broadband, and the very limited caps..


    The advent of ISPs such as Xtra and Clear, along with cheaper PCs
    running Windows were all instrumental in idiots getting on the
    internet. Now anyone who can afford an Android handset and can figure
    out how to connect to a free wifi hotspot has access. Doh!!

    :cool:


    --
    Crash McBash
    Crash, Nov 21, 2013
    #2
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  3. Possible

    Your Name Guest

    In article <>, Possible
    <> wrote:

    > They fixed a system fault that stuffed up my cable link due to a
    > corrupted profile with in 15mins of ringing them.
    >
    > Every thing at my end looked 100% but no network, Modem was showing
    > 100% as well, they had a system problem the night before, very slow
    > Internet, seems that it corrupted my Profile..


    "15 minutes" of ringing them ... but how many times did you ring them,
    and how long did you waste trawling through various "fixes" from the
    help desk droids studiously ignoring the fact that the problem is at
    their end.




    > But then again they took over the utter Crap Ihug, been there done that
    > the worse ISP I have ever had.


    ihug was great at the start, but in later years was quickly going down
    the toilet thanks to the sheer greed of the two idiots who owned it.
    When Vodafone bought it, it quickly went right down the toilet and is
    definitely THE worst ISP I've ever dealt with ... to the point of
    telling anyone who asks me that they shouldn't touch Vodafone with a
    60milllion foot barge pole.
    Your Name, Nov 21, 2013
    #3
  4. On Fri, 22 Nov 2013 09:47:56 +1300, Your Name <>
    wrote:

    >In article <>, Possible
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >> They fixed a system fault that stuffed up my cable link due to a
    >> corrupted profile with in 15mins of ringing them.
    >>
    >> Every thing at my end looked 100% but no network, Modem was showing
    >> 100% as well, they had a system problem the night before, very slow
    >> Internet, seems that it corrupted my Profile..

    >
    >"15 minutes" of ringing them ... but how many times did you ring them,
    >and how long did you waste trawling through various "fixes" from the
    >help desk droids studiously ignoring the fact that the problem is at
    >their end.
    >


    I rang Once and 15mins later it was fixed, I had done all the test my
    self and they just took my word as I am a retired mainframe Computer
    Engineer and new what I was doing.

    >
    >
    >> But then again they took over the utter Crap Ihug, been there done that
    >> the worse ISP I have ever had.

    >
    >ihug was great at the start, but in later years was quickly going down
    >the toilet thanks to the sheer greed of the two idiots who owned it.
    >When Vodafone bought it, it quickly went right down the toilet and is
    >definitely THE worst ISP I've ever dealt with ... to the point of
    >telling anyone who asks me that they shouldn't touch Vodafone with a
    >60milllion foot barge pole.
    Frank Williams, Nov 21, 2013
    #4
  5. Possible

    Gordon Guest

    On 2013-11-21, geoff <> wrote:
    > Possible wrote:
    >
    >
    > "There" ?


    And many postings elsewhere. I am starting to wonder if their will drop from
    the dictionary anytime now.

    Still English is a funny language. Refuse, verb or noun, both. So one can
    refuse the refuse.
    Gordon, Nov 22, 2013
    #5
  6. Possible

    Your Name Guest

    In article <>, Frank Williams
    <> wrote:

    > On Fri, 22 Nov 2013 09:47:56 +1300, Your Name <>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >In article <>, Possible
    > ><> wrote:
    > >
    > >> They fixed a system fault that stuffed up my cable link due to a
    > >> corrupted profile with in 15mins of ringing them.
    > >>
    > >> Every thing at my end looked 100% but no network, Modem was showing
    > >> 100% as well, they had a system problem the night before, very slow
    > >> Internet, seems that it corrupted my Profile..

    > >
    > >"15 minutes" of ringing them ... but how many times did you ring them,
    > >and how long did you waste trawling through various "fixes" from the
    > >help desk droids studiously ignoring the fact that the problem is at
    > >their end.

    >
    > I rang Once and 15mins later it was fixed, I had done all the test my
    > self and they just took my word as I am a retired mainframe Computer
    > Engineer and new what I was doing.


    Except how to spell "knew". ;-)

    I know what I'm doing to, but the Vodafone help desk droids never
    listen and simply keep trying to fix my Mac using Windows instructions.
    :-\
    Your Name, Nov 22, 2013
    #6
  7. Possible

    Your Name Guest

    In article <>, Gordon
    <> wrote:

    > On 2013-11-21, geoff <> wrote:
    > > Possible wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > > "There" ?

    >
    > And many postings elsewhere. I am starting to wonder if their will drop from
    > the dictionary anytime now.
    >
    > Still English is a funny language. Refuse, verb or noun, both. So one can
    > refuse the refuse.


    English is one of the hardest languages for a non-native speaker to
    learn thanks to all the strange idiosyncrancies ... and it isn't helped
    by Americans changing the spelling and meaning of words to suit
    themselves.

    A very simple example: "George takes a bow".

    Is George bending at the waist to show appreciate for applause?
    Is George selecting gift wrapping accessories for a present?
    Is George at an archery competition?
    Your Name, Nov 22, 2013
    #7
  8. Possible

    judges1318 Guest

    Your Name wrote:

    >>>
    >>> "There" ?

    >> And many postings elsewhere. I am starting to wonder if their will drop from
    >> the dictionary anytime now.
    >>
    >> Still English is a funny language. Refuse, verb or noun, both. So one can
    >> refuse the refuse.

    >
    > English is one of the hardest languages for a non-native speaker to
    > learn thanks to all the strange idiosyncrancies ... and it isn't helped
    > by Americans changing the spelling and meaning of words to suit
    > themselves.
    >
    >


    I do not think English is difficult. It is the ignorance of the grammar
    that makes any language difficult. And for that, you can blame the
    defective school programmes.
    judges1318, Nov 22, 2013
    #8
  9. Possible

    Your Name Guest

    In article <>, judges1318 <>
    wrote:
    > Your Name wrote:
    > >>>
    > >>> "There" ?
    > >> And many postings elsewhere. I am starting to wonder if their will drop
    > >> from the dictionary anytime now.
    > >>
    > >> Still English is a funny language. Refuse, verb or noun, both. So one can
    > >> refuse the refuse.

    > >
    > > English is one of the hardest languages for a non-native speaker to
    > > learn thanks to all the strange idiosyncrancies ... and it isn't helped
    > > by Americans changing the spelling and meaning of words to suit
    > > themselves.

    >
    > I do not think English is difficult. It is the ignorance of the grammar
    > that makes any language difficult. And for that, you can blame the
    > defective school programmes.


    Learning English is very difficult for people born into other
    languages. Mainly because of the idiosyncracies and lazy
    Americanisations, but also because it's a language cobbled together
    from various other sources and all the "rules" went out the window.

    Using English properly is difficult for native English speakers thanks
    to the idiotic schooling system these days more interested in sport and
    poking noses into kids' lunchboxes than in actually bothering to teach
    things like grammar and spelling. :-(
    Your Name, Nov 22, 2013
    #9
  10. Possible

    Crash Guest

    On Sat, 23 Nov 2013 10:11:53 +1300, Your Name <>
    wrote:

    >In article <>, judges1318 <>
    >wrote:
    >> Your Name wrote:
    >> >>>
    >> >>> "There" ?
    >> >> And many postings elsewhere. I am starting to wonder if their will drop
    >> >> from the dictionary anytime now.
    >> >>
    >> >> Still English is a funny language. Refuse, verb or noun, both. So one can
    >> >> refuse the refuse.
    >> >
    >> > English is one of the hardest languages for a non-native speaker to
    >> > learn thanks to all the strange idiosyncrancies ... and it isn't helped
    >> > by Americans changing the spelling and meaning of words to suit
    >> > themselves.

    >>
    >> I do not think English is difficult. It is the ignorance of the grammar
    >> that makes any language difficult. And for that, you can blame the
    >> defective school programmes.

    >
    >Learning English is very difficult for people born into other
    >languages. Mainly because of the idiosyncracies and lazy
    >Americanisations, but also because it's a language cobbled together
    >from various other sources and all the "rules" went out the window.
    >

    Yes - and when bough, trough, through and enough have the last 4
    letters in common but totally different pronunciations it makes life
    for learners of the language (whether 'native' or otherwise) quite
    difficult. Anyone care to explain to an English newbie the difference
    in meaning between 'shade' and 'shadow'.

    >Using English properly is difficult for native English speakers thanks
    >to the idiotic schooling system these days more interested in sport and
    >poking noses into kids' lunchboxes than in actually bothering to teach
    >things like grammar and spelling. :-(


    Agreed - English needs to be a basic curriculum focus for years 1 to
    10 at a minimum ;-)


    --
    Crash McBash
    Crash, Nov 22, 2013
    #10
  11. Possible

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Somewhere on teh intarwebs Your Name wrote:
    > In article <>, Gordon
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> On 2013-11-21, geoff <> wrote:
    >>> Possible wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "There" ?

    >>
    >> And many postings elsewhere. I am starting to wonder if their will
    >> drop from the dictionary anytime now.
    >>
    >> Still English is a funny language. Refuse, verb or noun, both. So
    >> one can refuse the refuse.

    >
    > English is one of the hardest languages for a non-native speaker to
    > learn thanks to all the strange idiosyncrancies ... and it isn't
    > helped by Americans changing the spelling and meaning of words to suit
    > themselves.
    >
    > A very simple example: "George takes a bow".
    >
    > Is George bending at the waist to show appreciate for applause?
    > Is George selecting gift wrapping accessories for a present?
    > Is George at an archery competition?


    The first of course. It's all in the syntax - there are clues everywhere.

    In this case it's that George is a gay persons name (not that there's
    anything wrong with that) and they like all things theatrical.

    ;-)
    --
    /Shaun.

    "Humans will have advanced a long, long, way when religious belief has a
    cozy little classification in the DSM."
    David Melville (in r.a.s.f1).
    [Sent from my OrbitalT ocular implant interface]
    ~misfit~, Nov 22, 2013
    #11
  12. Possible

    Your Name Guest

    In article <l6oktd$6nf$>, ~misfit~
    <> wrote:
    > Somewhere on teh intarwebs Your Name wrote:
    > > In article <>, Gordon
    > > <> wrote:
    > >> On 2013-11-21, geoff <> wrote:
    > >>> Possible wrote:
    > >>>
    > >>> "There" ?
    > >>
    > >> And many postings elsewhere. I am starting to wonder if their will
    > >> drop from the dictionary anytime now.
    > >>
    > >> Still English is a funny language. Refuse, verb or noun, both. So
    > >> one can refuse the refuse.

    > >
    > > English is one of the hardest languages for a non-native speaker to
    > > learn thanks to all the strange idiosyncrancies ... and it isn't
    > > helped by Americans changing the spelling and meaning of words to suit
    > > themselves.
    > >
    > > A very simple example: "George takes a bow".
    > >
    > > Is George bending at the waist to show appreciate for applause?
    > > Is George selecting gift wrapping accessories for a present?
    > > Is George at an archery competition?

    >
    > The first of course. It's all in the syntax - there are clues everywhere.
    >
    > In this case it's that George is a gay persons name (not that there's
    > anything wrong with that) and they like all things theatrical.
    >
    > ;-)


    Gay people also stereotypically like bows in the sense of ribbons and
    gift wrapping to make things look pretty.

    Gay people must also like archery ... how else do you explain Robin
    Hood and his Merry Men? ;-)
    Your Name, Nov 22, 2013
    #12
  13. Possible

    judges1318 Guest

    Crash wrote:
    > On Sat, 23 Nov 2013 10:11:53 +1300, Your Name <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> In article <>, judges1318 <>
    >> wrote:
    >>> Your Name wrote:
    >>>>>> "There" ?
    >>>>> And many postings elsewhere. I am starting to wonder if their will drop
    >>>>> from the dictionary anytime now.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Still English is a funny language. Refuse, verb or noun, both. So one can
    >>>>> refuse the refuse.
    >>>> English is one of the hardest languages for a non-native speaker to
    >>>> learn thanks to all the strange idiosyncrancies ... and it isn't helped
    >>>> by Americans changing the spelling and meaning of words to suit
    >>>> themselves.
    >>> I do not think English is difficult. It is the ignorance of the grammar
    >>> that makes any language difficult. And for that, you can blame the
    >>> defective school programmes.

    >> Learning English is very difficult for people born into other
    >> languages. Mainly because of the idiosyncracies and lazy
    >> Americanisations, but also because it's a language cobbled together
    >>from various other sources and all the "rules" went out the window.

    > Yes - and when bough, trough, through and enough have the last 4
    > letters in common but totally different pronunciations it makes life
    > for learners of the language (whether 'native' or otherwise) quite
    > difficult. Anyone care to explain to an English newbie the difference
    > in meaning between 'shade' and 'shadow'.
    >


    Shade is like a cold beer on a hot summer day.
    Shadow is like a cold tea on a rainy, windy, autumn evening.

    Joke aside, English is not a heavily inflexed language. Each word
    retains its form in various uses. Thus, the meaning of the word has to
    be deduced from the place in the sentence, and often from the context.

    Basically, in most normal, affirmative sentences, look for a verb, which
    splits the sentence into 3 parts. The first part is about who does the
    action of the verb, the second part is about the action of the verb, the
    third part is about the object that receives the action.

    I am writing a message.
    verb: am
    who: I
    action: writing
    object: message

    Remember Groucho Marx?
    Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana?

    The first "flies" is a verb, the second "flies" is a noun.
    The first "like" is an adverb, the second "like" is a verb.

    So, who:"time" does action:"flying like an arrow" to no object,
    whilst who:"fruit files" do action:"liking" to object:"a banana".

    Even sentences that sound like nonsense become much more intelligible
    when one analyses them grammatically.

    I agree that some unfortunate deviations from the grammatical formality
    have come from the American usage. But, it is not an excuse. Schools
    should teach formal grammar. I believe, people who can analyse a
    sentence correctly, can also form better sentences, especially when
    writing.

    Now back to poor learners of English. English should not be difficult
    if its formal grammar is explained. Then the words are just pieces that
    fit into slots of a pattern. But if they are not shown the pattern,
    then they cannot understand, even less form sentences correctly.

    >> Using English properly is difficult for native English speakers thanks
    >> to the idiotic schooling system these days more interested in sport and
    >> poking noses into kids' lunchboxes than in actually bothering to teach
    >> things like grammar and spelling. :-(

    >
    > Agreed - English needs to be a basic curriculum focus for years 1 to
    > 10 at a minimum ;-)
    >


    Very wholeheartedly agreed!
    judges1318, Nov 23, 2013
    #13
  14. Possible

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Somewhere on teh intarwebs Your Name wrote:
    > In article <>, Frank
    > Williams <> wrote:
    >
    >> On Fri, 22 Nov 2013 09:47:56 +1300, Your Name <>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <>, Possible
    >>> <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> They fixed a system fault that stuffed up my cable link due to a
    >>>> corrupted profile with in 15mins of ringing them.
    >>>>
    >>>> Every thing at my end looked 100% but no network, Modem was
    >>>> showing 100% as well, they had a system problem the night before,
    >>>> very slow Internet, seems that it corrupted my Profile..
    >>>
    >>> "15 minutes" of ringing them ... but how many times did you ring
    >>> them, and how long did you waste trawling through various "fixes"
    >>> from the help desk droids studiously ignoring the fact that the
    >>> problem is at their end.

    >>
    >> I rang Once and 15mins later it was fixed, I had done all the test
    >> my self and they just took my word as I am a retired mainframe
    >> Computer Engineer and new what I was doing.

    >
    > Except how to spell "knew". ;-)
    >
    > I know what I'm doing to, but the Vodafone help desk droids never
    > listen and simply keep trying to fix my Mac using Windows
    > instructions. :-\


    Except how to spell 'too'. ;-)
    --
    /Shaun.

    "Humans will have advanced a long, long, way when religious belief has a
    cozy little classification in the DSM."
    David Melville (in r.a.s.f1).
    [Sent from my OrbitalT ocular implant interface]
    ~misfit~, Nov 24, 2013
    #14
  15. Possible

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Somewhere on teh intarwebs geoff wrote:
    > Your Name wrote:
    >> In article <l6oktd$6nf$>, ~misfit~

    >
    >>
    >> Gay people also stereotypically like bows in the sense of ribbons and
    >> gift wrapping to make things look pretty.
    >>
    >> Gay people must also like archery ... how else do you explain Robin
    >> Hood and his Merry Men? ;-)

    >
    > Some may bend at the waist too ;-0


    LOLs @ both replies. ;-)
    --
    /Shaun.

    "Humans will have advanced a long, long, way when religious belief has a
    cozy little classification in the DSM."
    David Melville (in r.a.s.f1).
    [Sent from my OrbitalT ocular implant interface]
    ~misfit~, Nov 24, 2013
    #15
  16. In article <>, Crash <> wrote:
    (snip)
    >Yes - and when bough, trough, through and enough have the last 4
    >letters in common but totally different pronunciations it makes life
    >for learners of the language (whether 'native' or otherwise) quite
    >difficult. Anyone care to explain to an English newbie the difference
    >in meaning between 'shade' and 'shadow'.


    Context is really important. Always.

    And for spelling I give you ...

    ghoti

    "fish" :) :)

    Yes, I think spelling should be cleaned up so it looks like it sounds.
    Bruce Sinclair, Nov 25, 2013
    #16
  17. In article <231120131204023990%>, Your Name <> wrote:
    (snip)

    >> > A very simple example: "George takes a bow".
    >> >
    >> > Is George bending at the waist to show appreciate for applause?
    >> > Is George selecting gift wrapping accessories for a present?
    >> > Is George at an archery competition?

    >> The first of course. It's all in the syntax - there are clues everywhere.
    >> In this case it's that George is a gay persons name (not that there's
    >> anything wrong with that) and they like all things theatrical.
    >>
    >> ;-)

    >
    >Gay people also stereotypically like bows in the sense of ribbons and
    >gift wrapping to make things look pretty.
    >Gay people must also like archery ... how else do you explain Robin
    >Hood and his Merry Men? ;-)


    ... are you meaning gay as in homosexual ? ... or as in "happy and" ?

    A recent example where words have changed meaning (sadly IMO).

    A personally hated similar example ... decimate. It does not mean
    "destroyed" or obliterated people ! :)
    Bruce Sinclair, Nov 25, 2013
    #17
  18. In article <221120131854554158%>, Your Name <> wrote:
    (snip)
    >> I rang Once and 15mins later it was fixed, I had done all the test my
    >> self and they just took my word as I am a retired mainframe Computer
    >> Engineer and new what I was doing.

    >
    >Except how to spell "knew". ;-)
    >
    >I know what I'm doing to, but the Vodafone help desk droids never
    >listen and simply keep trying to fix my Mac using Windows instructions.
    >:-\


    ... and that law is operating ... "too".


    <aside> It's fun talking to the "your windows computer is broken" people and
    doing exactly what they say ... when you have a linux machine. :) :)
    Bruce Sinclair, Nov 25, 2013
    #18
  19. Possible

    Your Name Guest

    In article <l6u258$792$>, Bruce Sinclair
    <> wrote:

    > In article <231120131204023990%>, Your Name
    > <> wrote:
    > (snip)
    >
    > >> > A very simple example: "George takes a bow".
    > >> >
    > >> > Is George bending at the waist to show appreciate for applause?
    > >> > Is George selecting gift wrapping accessories for a present?
    > >> > Is George at an archery competition?
    > >> The first of course. It's all in the syntax - there are clues everywhere.
    > >> In this case it's that George is a gay persons name (not that there's
    > >> anything wrong with that) and they like all things theatrical.
    > >>
    > >> ;-)

    > >
    > >Gay people also stereotypically like bows in the sense of ribbons and
    > >gift wrapping to make things look pretty.
    > >Gay people must also like archery ... how else do you explain Robin
    > >Hood and his Merry Men? ;-)

    >
    > .. are you meaning gay as in homosexual ? ... or as in "happy and" ?
    >
    > A recent example where words have changed meaning (sadly IMO).


    Yep, that's another of the MANY MANY MANY examples.



    > A personally hated similar example ... decimate. It does not mean
    > "destroyed" or obliterated people ! :)


    Decimate ... means to put a decimal point in, e.g. when you decimate
    100 it becomes 100.0 ;-)
    Your Name, Nov 25, 2013
    #19
  20. In article <251120132009255943%>, Your Name <> wrote:
    >In article <l6u258$792$>, Bruce Sinclair
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >> In article <231120131204023990%>, Your Name
    >> <> wrote:
    >> (snip)
    >>
    >> >> > A very simple example: "George takes a bow".
    >> >> >
    >> >> > Is George bending at the waist to show appreciate for applause?
    >> >> > Is George selecting gift wrapping accessories for a present?
    >> >> > Is George at an archery competition?
    >> >> The first of course. It's all in the syntax - there are clues everywhere.
    >> >> In this case it's that George is a gay persons name (not that there's
    >> >> anything wrong with that) and they like all things theatrical.
    >> >>
    >> >> ;-)
    >> >
    >> >Gay people also stereotypically like bows in the sense of ribbons and
    >> >gift wrapping to make things look pretty.
    >> >Gay people must also like archery ... how else do you explain Robin
    >> >Hood and his Merry Men? ;-)

    >>
    >> .. are you meaning gay as in homosexual ? ... or as in "happy and" ?
    >> A recent example where words have changed meaning (sadly IMO).

    >
    >Yep, that's another of the MANY MANY MANY examples.
    >
    >> A personally hated similar example ... decimate. It does not mean
    >> "destroyed" or obliterated people ! :)

    >
    >Decimate ... means to put a decimal point in, e.g. when you decimate
    >100 it becomes 100.0 ;-)


    No no no ... that's decimalate. :)
    Bruce Sinclair, Nov 25, 2013
    #20
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