vlc - cool

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by steve, Dec 3, 2005.

  1. steve

    steve Guest

    Used vlc (videolan) today to stream a video from one PC to another - with
    sound - over my home wlan. It's 802.11b (11mbps), but coped very well and
    the quality was excellent.

    Easy to install.....took a couple of secs to work out how to stream - and
    how to receive.....and then we were away.

    Very cool.
     
    steve, Dec 3, 2005
    #1
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  2. steve wrote:
    > Used vlc (videolan) today to stream a video from one PC to another - with
    > sound - over my home wlan. It's 802.11b (11mbps), but coped very well and
    > the quality was excellent.
    >
    > Easy to install.....took a couple of secs to work out how to stream - and
    > how to receive.....and then we were away.
    >
    > Very cool.


    It is unfortunate the server hasn't matured to the same extent as the
    client. It would be good to have VideoLAN as the engine behind a
    distributed video on demand system. Having your DVD video intelligently
    streamed across the network, and only sending the streams you're
    interested in, is far better than simply opening a video file somewhere
    else on the network.

    I've looked at MythTV and similar systems, and while they do the job,
    they don't give me a simple system on which I can dump a copy of all my
    DVDs (once the legislation is altered to permit format shifting I mean).

    The Other Guy
     
    The Other Guy, Dec 3, 2005
    #2
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  3. steve

    steve Guest

    The Other Guy wrote:

    > steve wrote:
    >> Used vlc (videolan) today to stream a video from one PC to another - with
    >> sound - over my home wlan. It's 802.11b (11mbps), but coped very well and
    >> the quality was excellent.
    >>
    >> Easy to install.....took a couple of secs to work out how to stream - and
    >> how to receive.....and then we were away.
    >>
    >> Very cool.

    >
    > It is unfortunate the server hasn't matured to the same extent as the
    > client. It would be good to have VideoLAN as the engine behind a
    > distributed video on demand system. Having your DVD video intelligently
    > streamed across the network, and only sending the streams you're
    > interested in, is far better than simply opening a video file somewhere
    > else on the network.
    >
    > I've looked at MythTV and similar systems, and while they do the job,
    > they don't give me a simple system on which I can dump a copy of all my
    > DVDs (once the legislation is altered to permit format shifting I mean).
    >
    > The Other Guy


    vlc has a playlist.

    It looked to me like you could define the files in a play list.....and then
    use that play list to stream that content more or less on demand.

    To control the serving vlc I did resort to VNC to drive the server
    machine.....

    I'll look into this as the vlc 'preferences" dialogs under "Settings" do
    specifically mention "VOD" (video on demand).
     
    steve, Dec 3, 2005
    #3
  4. steve

    David Guest

    The Other Guy wrote:
    > steve wrote:
    >
    >> Used vlc (videolan) today to stream a video from one PC to another - with
    >> sound - over my home wlan. It's 802.11b (11mbps), but coped very well and
    >> the quality was excellent.
    >> Easy to install.....took a couple of secs to work out how to stream - and
    >> how to receive.....and then we were away.
    >> Very cool.

    >
    >
    > It is unfortunate the server hasn't matured to the same extent as the
    > client. It would be good to have VideoLAN as the engine behind a
    > distributed video on demand system. Having your DVD video intelligently
    > streamed across the network, and only sending the streams you're
    > interested in, is far better than simply opening a video file somewhere
    > else on the network.


    What is the advantage of streaming it, rather than just playing the
    files over windows/other network file sharing?

    >
    > I've looked at MythTV and similar systems, and while they do the job,
    > they don't give me a simple system on which I can dump a copy of all my
    > DVDs (once the legislation is altered to permit format shifting I mean).
    >
    > The Other Guy
     
    David, Dec 3, 2005
    #4
  5. steve

    Craig Shore Guest

    On Sat, 03 Dec 2005 17:19:07 +1300, David <> wrote:

    >The Other Guy wrote:
    >> steve wrote:
    >>
    >>> Used vlc (videolan) today to stream a video from one PC to another - with
    >>> sound - over my home wlan. It's 802.11b (11mbps), but coped very well and
    >>> the quality was excellent.
    >>> Easy to install.....took a couple of secs to work out how to stream - and
    >>> how to receive.....and then we were away.
    >>> Very cool.

    >>
    >>
    >> It is unfortunate the server hasn't matured to the same extent as the
    >> client. It would be good to have VideoLAN as the engine behind a
    >> distributed video on demand system. Having your DVD video intelligently
    >> streamed across the network, and only sending the streams you're
    >> interested in, is far better than simply opening a video file somewhere
    >> else on the network.

    >
    >What is the advantage of streaming it, rather than just playing the
    >files over windows/other network file sharing?


    That's what I was wondering too. Like you can just choose both from a list
    anyway.
     
    Craig Shore, Dec 3, 2005
    #5
  6. steve

    -=rjh=- Guest

    Craig Shore wrote:
    > On Sat, 03 Dec 2005 17:19:07 +1300, David <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>The Other Guy wrote:
    >>
    >>>steve wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Used vlc (videolan) today to stream a video from one PC to another - with
    >>>>sound - over my home wlan. It's 802.11b (11mbps), but coped very well and
    >>>>the quality was excellent.
    >>>>Easy to install.....took a couple of secs to work out how to stream - and
    >>>>how to receive.....and then we were away.
    >>>>Very cool.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>It is unfortunate the server hasn't matured to the same extent as the
    >>>client. It would be good to have VideoLAN as the engine behind a
    >>>distributed video on demand system. Having your DVD video intelligently
    >>>streamed across the network, and only sending the streams you're
    >>>interested in, is far better than simply opening a video file somewhere
    >>>else on the network.

    >>
    >>What is the advantage of streaming it, rather than just playing the
    >>files over windows/other network file sharing?

    >
    >
    > That's what I was wondering too. Like you can just choose both from a list
    > anyway.
    >
    >


    A true geek will never do things the easy way.
     
    -=rjh=-, Dec 3, 2005
    #6
  7. Craig Shore wrote:
    >>What is the advantage of streaming it, rather than just playing the
    >>files over windows/other network file sharing?

    >
    > That's what I was wondering too. Like you can just choose both from a list
    > anyway.


    There are reasons to use streaming rather than directly sharing files.
    The three I can think of right now are,

    1/ Streaming allows one-to-many distribution with minimal network
    overhead. Not much use in the average home, although I personally would
    like this.

    2/ Network use can be optimised to send only what is required by
    clients. E.g. There is no point sending alternate audio tracks across
    the network if none of the clients need it.

    3/ Related to points 1 and 2, seeking. Depending on the nature of the
    video stream, and the type of file sharing involved, it may be necessary
    to sequentially process the file in order to move forward or backwards
    in the stream. Having this occur on the server reduces network use and
    seek time.

    The Other Guy
     
    The Other Guy, Dec 3, 2005
    #7
  8. steve

    steve Guest

    David wrote:

    > The Other Guy wrote:
    >> steve wrote:
    >>
    >>> Used vlc (videolan) today to stream a video from one PC to another -
    >>> with sound - over my home wlan. It's 802.11b (11mbps), but coped very
    >>> well and the quality was excellent.
    >>> Easy to install.....took a couple of secs to work out how to stream -
    >>> and how to receive.....and then we were away.
    >>> Very cool.

    >>
    >>
    >> It is unfortunate the server hasn't matured to the same extent as the
    >> client. It would be good to have VideoLAN as the engine behind a
    >> distributed video on demand system. Having your DVD video intelligently
    >> streamed across the network, and only sending the streams you're
    >> interested in, is far better than simply opening a video file somewhere
    >> else on the network.

    >
    > What is the advantage of streaming it, rather than just playing the
    > files over windows/other network file sharing?


    Depends on what you want to do.....but the main advantage as far as I can
    see would be that multiple systems can watch the same stream without
    multiplying the data flying around the lan or the accesses to the server
    hard drive....and the stream can be controlled from the server end as well
    as from the client end.

    VLC also allows you to transcode the source file into other formats for
    streaming.
     
    steve, Dec 3, 2005
    #8
  9. steve

    Craig Shore Guest

    On Sat, 03 Dec 2005 18:01:02 +1300, The Other Guy <> wrote:

    >Craig Shore wrote:
    >>>What is the advantage of streaming it, rather than just playing the
    >>>files over windows/other network file sharing?

    >>
    >> That's what I was wondering too. Like you can just choose both from a list
    >> anyway.

    >
    >There are reasons to use streaming rather than directly sharing files.
    >The three I can think of right now are,
    >
    >1/ Streaming allows one-to-many distribution with minimal network
    >overhead. Not much use in the average home, although I personally would
    >like this.


    How does this work with a network switch, which usually only sends the data to
    the one network device? Can they somehow handle streaming data to more than one
    network device?

    I've got a home network here, but have never really understood how it works.
     
    Craig Shore, Dec 3, 2005
    #9
  10. steve

    GraB Guest

    On Sat, 03 Dec 2005 15:00:05 +1300, steve <>
    wrote:

    >Used vlc (videolan) today to stream a video from one PC to another - with
    >sound - over my home wlan. It's 802.11b (11mbps), but coped very well and
    >the quality was excellent.
    >
    >Easy to install.....took a couple of secs to work out how to stream - and
    >how to receive.....and then we were away.
    >
    >Very cool.
    >

    One interesting thing I found recently with VLC was it could play an
    AVI file made with a codec I had never heard of, when no other player
    on my PC, including Media Player Classic, could do so. This clip,
    from one of the "Carry On" movies was made with the On2 VP3 codec,
    which I eventually located and installed. VLC played it perfectly
    before I installed the codec.
     
    GraB, Dec 3, 2005
    #10
  11. > How does this work with a network switch, which usually only sends the
    > data to
    > the one network device? Can they somehow handle streaming data to more
    > than one
    > network device?
    >
    > I've got a home network here, but have never really understood how it
    > works.
    >


    Easily done.. Its called Multicast.. It sends out 1 stream of data to a
    network "group". Each machine "listens" on a network "group" ip address and
    whatever it send to that group is played. The sending machine only has to
    send 1 stream of data which is different if you use normal unicast which
    each server sending would have a stream to each client.

    Thanks
    Craig
     
    Craig Whitmore, Dec 3, 2005
    #11
  12. steve

    steve Guest

    GraB wrote:

    > One interesting thing I found recently with VLC was it could play an
    > AVI file made with a codec I had never heard of, when no other player
    > on my PC, including Media Player Classic, could do so. This clip,
    > from one of the "Carry On" movies was made with the On2 VP3 codec,
    > which I eventually located and installed. VLC played it perfectly
    > before I installed the codec.


    It's good that way.

    Codecs - licensed or not - are just......there.
     
    steve, Dec 3, 2005
    #12
  13. steve

    David Guest

    GraB wrote:
    > On Sat, 03 Dec 2005 15:00:05 +1300, steve <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Used vlc (videolan) today to stream a video from one PC to another - with
    >>sound - over my home wlan. It's 802.11b (11mbps), but coped very well and
    >>the quality was excellent.
    >>
    >>Easy to install.....took a couple of secs to work out how to stream - and
    >>how to receive.....and then we were away.
    >>
    >>Very cool.
    >>

    >
    > One interesting thing I found recently with VLC was it could play an
    > AVI file made with a codec I had never heard of, when no other player
    > on my PC, including Media Player Classic, could do so. This clip,
    > from one of the "Carry On" movies was made with the On2 VP3 codec,
    > which I eventually located and installed. VLC played it perfectly
    > before I installed the codec.


    It plays everything other players wont touch, it can even play partially
    downloaded files with massive chunks missing, even when the files are
    being written to at the same time. However for actually playing movies I
    use zoomplayer, it's aspect-ratio-fiddling settings are amazing, if i
    set it to 'anamorphic', connect it to my TV via its VGA input, and set
    the TV ratio to 16:9, I get a nice widescreen picture that fills the
    screen and wastes no resolution.
     
    David, Dec 3, 2005
    #13
  14. steve

    steve Guest

    Craig Whitmore wrote:

    >> How does this work with a network switch, which usually only sends the
    >> data to
    >> the one network device? Can they somehow handle streaming data to more
    >> than one
    >> network device?
    >>
    >> I've got a home network here, but have never really understood how it
    >> works.
    >>

    >
    > Easily done.. Its called Multicast.. It sends out 1 stream of data to a
    > network "group". Each machine "listens" on a network "group" ip address
    > and whatever it send to that group is played. The sending machine only has
    > to send 1 stream of data which is different if you use normal unicast
    > which each server sending would have a stream to each client.
    >
    > Thanks
    > Craig


    How does this work?

    I see where one can specify the multicast IP address and a group name....and
    they say if you want a private address, use 239.255

    I see what they are saying.....but I'm still very much in the dark as to
    what it MEANS as far as actually configuring the servers and clients.

    I haven't read the docs yet.....and know I should....but you have given the
    impression you may be able to help me cut to the chase. :)
     
    steve, Dec 4, 2005
    #14
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