Vivitar 285

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Gary Eickmeier, Aug 22, 2004.

  1. I have a new Vivitar 285HV flash for my Oly E20. It seems to be really
    off in its thyristor exposure settings. I have followed all instructions
    on which f-stop to choose according to which color range I want, and it
    is consistently two stops too dark in exposure. I tested it on manual,
    by computing the f-stop according to the distance in feet and guide
    number, and that worked out just fine. I shot something 10 ft away and
    put it on f10 with a 107 guide number, and it was perfect. Then, at 20
    ft, I used f5.0, which also worked perfectly. Then, I tried the color
    ranges with thyristor control of the flash again, and it was two stops
    under. I have been using a 263 Vivitar for a long time, and it seemed to
    work OK with the thyristor. But I broke its little foot (again), and
    thought maybe the 285 would be a nice improvement.

    Anyone else have a 285?

    Gary Eickmeier
     
    Gary Eickmeier, Aug 22, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Gary Eickmeier

    Hunt Guest

    In article <qZTVc.42833$>, geickmei@tampabay
    ..rr.com says...
    >
    >I have a new Vivitar 285HV flash for my Oly E20. It seems to be really
    >off in its thyristor exposure settings. I have followed all instructions
    >on which f-stop to choose according to which color range I want, and it
    >is consistently two stops too dark in exposure. I tested it on manual,
    >by computing the f-stop according to the distance in feet and guide
    >number, and that worked out just fine. I shot something 10 ft away and
    >put it on f10 with a 107 guide number, and it was perfect. Then, at 20
    >ft, I used f5.0, which also worked perfectly. Then, I tried the color
    >ranges with thyristor control of the flash again, and it was two stops
    >under. I have been using a 263 Vivitar for a long time, and it seemed to
    >work OK with the thyristor. But I broke its little foot (again), and
    >thought maybe the 285 would be a nice improvement.
    >
    >Anyone else have a 285?
    >
    >Gary Eickmeier


    Many years ago, when they were new, my partner had about six of them. I used a
    few on occasion and found them to be reliable and powerful, especially with a
    510v battery pack. When I shot them, it was with a Hassleblad 500c and Nikon
    F2 and never noticed any problem. We used them on auto most of the time and
    checked them periodicly with a Minolta Flash I meter. My partner used them
    exclusively for his portrait/wedding business on location. The only problem
    that I recall was the aforementioned foot. He had a box of about 12 of them,
    and would replace them as required. My usage was limited to grip n' grins for
    advertising clients, but they worked fine.

    I'd look into the settings you are using, to make sure that something is not
    set funny. Next, borrow a good flash meter, and run the tests on the unit. I
    cannot recall any of the mechanics, after all these years, so the settings are
    long since lost to me. Other than the attachment foot, these were great units
    for the $, the weight, and never failed.

    Sorry I don't have more direct info for you on the 265's, but think something
    is wrong either with yours, or the auto settings.

    Hunt
     
    Hunt, Aug 22, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. On Sun, 22 Aug 2004 02:58:30 GMT, Gary Eickmeier
    <> wrote:

    >I have a new Vivitar 285HV flash for my Oly E20. It seems to be really
    >off in its thyristor exposure settings. I have followed all instructions
    >on which f-stop to choose according to which color range I want, and it
    >is consistently two stops too dark in exposure. I tested it on manual,
    >by computing the f-stop according to the distance in feet and guide
    >number, and that worked out just fine. I shot something 10 ft away and
    >put it on f10 with a 107 guide number, and it was perfect. Then, at 20
    >ft, I used f5.0, which also worked perfectly. Then, I tried the color
    >ranges with thyristor control of the flash again, and it was two stops
    >under. I have been using a 263 Vivitar for a long time, and it seemed to
    >work OK with the thyristor. But I broke its little foot (again), and
    >thought maybe the 285 would be a nice improvement.
    >
    >Anyone else have a 285?


    I have a 285, but never used it on my E20N. Works great on the F4S
    and 8008S

    I'll have to give it a try on the E20N

    Roger Halstead (K8RI & ARRL life member)
    (N833R, S# CD-2 Worlds oldest Debonair)
    www.rogerhalstead.com
    >
    >Gary Eickmeier
     
    Roger Halstead, Aug 22, 2004
    #3
  4. Hunt wrote:

    > Many years ago, when they were new, my partner had about six of them. I used a
    > few on occasion and found them to be reliable and powerful, especially with a
    > 510v battery pack. When I shot them, it was with a Hassleblad 500c and Nikon
    > F2 and never noticed any problem. We used them on auto most of the time and
    > checked them periodicly with a Minolta Flash I meter. My partner used them
    > exclusively for his portrait/wedding business on location. The only problem
    > that I recall was the aforementioned foot. He had a box of about 12 of them,
    > and would replace them as required. My usage was limited to grip n' grins for
    > advertising clients, but they worked fine.
    >
    > I'd look into the settings you are using, to make sure that something is not
    > set funny. Next, borrow a good flash meter, and run the tests on the unit. I
    > cannot recall any of the mechanics, after all these years, so the settings are
    > long since lost to me. Other than the attachment foot, these were great units
    > for the $, the weight, and never failed.
    >
    > Sorry I don't have more direct info for you on the 265's, but think something
    > is wrong either with yours, or the auto settings.


    Thanks. I just wish you were using it with a modern digital camera, or
    that you had more recent experience with it. As I said, I have carefully
    followed all instructions on the settings, and in every range it
    underexposes. I will measure it with a meter, but the point is, the
    histogram shows the underexposure clearly and consistently.

    Gary Eickmeier
     
    Gary Eickmeier, Aug 22, 2004
    #4
  5. Roger Halstead wrote:

    > I have a 285, but never used it on my E20N. Works great on the F4S
    > and 8008S
    >
    > I'll have to give it a try on the E20N


    Yes - please do. I am thinking that digitals are a lot fussier about
    exposure, which means we need something that will be accurate for us. I
    don't want to have to be calculating f-stops during a wedding or
    something, so I want to be able to trust the auto (thyristor) settings.
    It seems that the flash itself is powerful enough, but the thyristor
    measuring system or the dial's settings are in error by two stops.

    Yes, I set the secondary dial to "Full" and the flash head to Normal.
    Then, all there is to do is rotate the main dial to put the ISO (80)
    opposite the white pointer, and look at the f-stop opposite the color
    you have set on the thyristor dial. I don't see much room for
    misunderstanding or misreading of the instructions there - been thru it
    many times.

    I tried to E-mail Vivitar from their web site, but found it impossible.
    When you punch up the "E-mail" tab, it gives you the phone number! So I
    will eventually call them, but so far no answer from Vivitar yet.

    Gary Eickmeier
     
    Gary Eickmeier, Aug 22, 2004
    #5
  6. Gary Eickmeier

    Canongirly Guest


    >
    > Yes - please do. I am thinking that digitals are a lot fussier about
    > exposure, which means we need something that will be accurate for us. I
    > don't want to have to be calculating f-stops during a wedding or
    > something, so I want to be able to trust the auto (thyristor) settings.
    > It seems that the flash itself is powerful enough, but the thyristor
    > measuring system or the dial's settings are in error by two stops.
    >


    Just a thought but ....if you know it habitually is going to under expose by
    two stops adjust the iso dial accordingly.
     
    Canongirly, Aug 22, 2004
    #6
  7. Gary Eickmeier

    Jerry Shaw Guest

    Gary,

    Gary Eickmeier <> wrote:

    >I have a new Vivitar 285HV flash for my Oly E20. It seems to be really
    >off in its thyristor exposure settings. I have followed all instructions
    >on which f-stop to choose according to which color range I want, and it
    >is consistently two stops too dark in exposure. I tested it on manual,
    >by computing the f-stop according to the distance in feet and guide
    >number, and that worked out just fine. I shot something 10 ft away and
    >put it on f10 with a 107 guide number, and it was perfect. Then, at 20
    >ft, I used f5.0, which also worked perfectly. Then, I tried the color
    >ranges with thyristor control of the flash again, and it was two stops
    >under. I have been using a 263 Vivitar for a long time, and it seemed to
    >work OK with the thyristor. But I broke its little foot (again), and
    >thought maybe the 285 would be a nice improvement.
    >
    >Anyone else have a 285?


    I have a 285 that I use exclusively. I have been using 285's for at least 25
    years. I bought another one a couple years back, when I "upgraded" my camera,
    in case my 25 year old one was out of calibration.

    I have never had a problem with it (but see below). The exposure is right on,
    to the extent that I use the Auto settings and back off 2/3 stops on the lens
    to give me a little more saturation (like I used to do with slide film).

    First, unplug the sensor and plug it back in again (it unplugs). It may have a
    little dirt or corrosion on the contacts, that may be causing your problems.
    Make sure you plug it back in tightly, as it is a snug fit.

    If the manual exposure is OK but the auto is off, I would suspect the sensor,
    as I believe the exposure compensation is in the sensor. The problem I had
    with one of my older 285's (after several years of use), was that the auto
    ring got dirty, and it wouldn't hold the settings. Sometimes it would fire
    full power, and other times minimum.

    Another hint that it is in the sensor is that the difference between the
    minimum power (yellow) setting and the next setting (the red) is exactly two
    stops, the amount you said it was under. Try a few shots at the yellow setting
    with the ring turned as far as possible toward the yellow. The internal
    detents may be off, stopping it in the wrong place. That will be most evident
    when using the red range, as it will still look red when it is actually making
    contact with the yellow range.

    If you are still having trouble and suspect it is bad, go to a camera store
    and see if they can test it for you, just with one of their flash meters. try
    it at all of the exposures, both auto and manual. If they have another 285,
    ask them to try it at the same auto setting and compare their readings with
    yours. You can also try to exchange the sensor with the camera shop's, to see
    if it improves the exposure. If that helps, the problem is in the sensor, not
    the body. If yours is off on any of the settings, return it or contact Vivitar
    for a repair (if it is new, it should still be under warrantee).

    Hope any of this helps,

    >Gary Eickmeier


    Jerry
     
    Jerry Shaw, Aug 22, 2004
    #7
  8. Canongirly wrote:

    > Just a thought but ....if you know it habitually is going to under expose by
    > two stops adjust the iso dial accordingly.
    >

    Terrific thought, but... aren't you bothered at all by a manufacturer's
    product that is off by TWO stops?

    Gary Eickmeier
     
    Gary Eickmeier, Aug 22, 2004
    #8
  9. Jerry Shaw wrote:

    > I have a 285 that I use exclusively. I have been using 285's for at least 25
    > years. I bought another one a couple years back, when I "upgraded" my camera,
    > in case my 25 year old one was out of calibration.
    >
    > I have never had a problem with it (but see below). The exposure is right on,
    > to the extent that I use the Auto settings and back off 2/3 stops on the lens
    > to give me a little more saturation (like I used to do with slide film).
    >
    > First, unplug the sensor and plug it back in again (it unplugs). It may have a
    > little dirt or corrosion on the contacts, that may be causing your problems.
    > Make sure you plug it back in tightly, as it is a snug fit.
    >
    > If the manual exposure is OK but the auto is off, I would suspect the sensor,
    > as I believe the exposure compensation is in the sensor. The problem I had
    > with one of my older 285's (after several years of use), was that the auto
    > ring got dirty, and it wouldn't hold the settings. Sometimes it would fire
    > full power, and other times minimum.
    >
    > Another hint that it is in the sensor is that the difference between the
    > minimum power (yellow) setting and the next setting (the red) is exactly two
    > stops, the amount you said it was under. Try a few shots at the yellow setting
    > with the ring turned as far as possible toward the yellow. The internal
    > detents may be off, stopping it in the wrong place. That will be most evident
    > when using the red range, as it will still look red when it is actually making
    > contact with the yellow range.
    >
    > If you are still having trouble and suspect it is bad, go to a camera store
    > and see if they can test it for you, just with one of their flash meters. try
    > it at all of the exposures, both auto and manual. If they have another 285,
    > ask them to try it at the same auto setting and compare their readings with
    > yours. You can also try to exchange the sensor with the camera shop's, to see
    > if it improves the exposure. If that helps, the problem is in the sensor, not
    > the body. If yours is off on any of the settings, return it or contact Vivitar
    > for a repair (if it is new, it should still be under warrantee).


    Thanks Jerry. I don't need a camera shop to take flash meter readings
    from it, but I agree with you that it might be in the sensor. Just that
    it is a brand new unit, and I have read another user who said his was
    doing the same thing. Maybe I could wrangle another sensor out of
    Vivitar. Two of them can't be bad or doing the same thing... could they?

    No camera shops locally have a 285 to play with.

    Gary Eickmeier
     
    Gary Eickmeier, Aug 22, 2004
    #9
  10. Gary Eickmeier

    Hunt Guest

    In article <uu1Wc.50887$>, geickmei@tampabay.
    rr.com says...
    >
    >
    >
    >Roger Halstead wrote:
    >
    >> I have a 285, but never used it on my E20N. Works great on the F4S
    >> and 8008S
    >>
    >> I'll have to give it a try on the E20N

    >
    >Yes - please do. I am thinking that digitals are a lot fussier about
    >exposure, which means we need something that will be accurate for us. I
    >don't want to have to be calculating f-stops during a wedding or
    >something, so I want to be able to trust the auto (thyristor) settings.
    >It seems that the flash itself is powerful enough, but the thyristor
    >measuring system or the dial's settings are in error by two stops.
    >
    >Yes, I set the secondary dial to "Full" and the flash head to Normal.
    >Then, all there is to do is rotate the main dial to put the ISO (80)
    >opposite the white pointer, and look at the f-stop opposite the color
    >you have set on the thyristor dial. I don't see much room for
    >misunderstanding or misreading of the instructions there - been thru it
    >many times.
    >
    >I tried to E-mail Vivitar from their web site, but found it impossible.
    >When you punch up the "E-mail" tab, it gives you the phone number! So I
    >will eventually call them, but so far no answer from Vivitar yet.
    >
    >Gary Eickmeier


    Gary,

    I've been thinking - damned dusty back in recesses, though. Isn't the sensor a
    plug-in unit on the 285? It seems that there were a couple that were offered,
    but I cannot conjure up what each was used for. Could you have a specialized
    sensor in your unit, or could it be that the unit itself is bad. Do you have
    access to a pro-photo shop? Maybe swap the sensor for a new one for an in-
    store test. Oops, all visions of 285's have faded. I'lll try agian tomorrow.
    Sorry for so much input, but so little help.

    Good luck,
    Hunt
    >
     
    Hunt, Aug 22, 2004
    #10
  11. Gary Eickmeier

    Hunt Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    >
    >Gary,
    >
    >Gary Eickmeier <> wrote:
    >
    >>I have a new Vivitar 285HV flash for my Oly E20. It seems to be really
    >>off in its thyristor exposure settings. I have followed all instructions
    >>on which f-stop to choose according to which color range I want, and it
    >>is consistently two stops too dark in exposure. I tested it on manual,
    >>by computing the f-stop according to the distance in feet and guide
    >>number, and that worked out just fine. I shot something 10 ft away and
    >>put it on f10 with a 107 guide number, and it was perfect. Then, at 20
    >>ft, I used f5.0, which also worked perfectly. Then, I tried the color
    >>ranges with thyristor control of the flash again, and it was two stops
    >>under. I have been using a 263 Vivitar for a long time, and it seemed to
    >>work OK with the thyristor. But I broke its little foot (again), and
    >>thought maybe the 285 would be a nice improvement.
    >>
    >>Anyone else have a 285?

    >
    >I have a 285 that I use exclusively. I have been using 285's for at least 25
    >years. I bought another one a couple years back, when I "upgraded" my camera,
    >in case my 25 year old one was out of calibration.
    >
    >I have never had a problem with it (but see below). The exposure is right on,
    >to the extent that I use the Auto settings and back off 2/3 stops on the lens
    >to give me a little more saturation (like I used to do with slide film).
    >
    >First, unplug the sensor and plug it back in again (it unplugs). It may have

    a
    >little dirt or corrosion on the contacts, that may be causing your problems.
    >Make sure you plug it back in tightly, as it is a snug fit.
    >
    >If the manual exposure is OK but the auto is off, I would suspect the sensor,
    >as I believe the exposure compensation is in the sensor. The problem I had
    >with one of my older 285's (after several years of use), was that the auto
    >ring got dirty, and it wouldn't hold the settings. Sometimes it would fire
    >full power, and other times minimum.
    >
    >Another hint that it is in the sensor is that the difference between the
    >minimum power (yellow) setting and the next setting (the red) is exactly two
    >stops, the amount you said it was under. Try a few shots at the yellow

    setting
    >with the ring turned as far as possible toward the yellow. The internal
    >detents may be off, stopping it in the wrong place. That will be most evident
    >when using the red range, as it will still look red when it is actually

    making
    >contact with the yellow range.
    >
    >If you are still having trouble and suspect it is bad, go to a camera store
    >and see if they can test it for you, just with one of their flash meters. try
    >it at all of the exposures, both auto and manual. If they have another 285,
    >ask them to try it at the same auto setting and compare their readings with
    >yours. You can also try to exchange the sensor with the camera shop's, to see
    >if it improves the exposure. If that helps, the problem is in the sensor, not
    >the body. If yours is off on any of the settings, return it or contact

    Vivitar
    >for a repair (if it is new, it should still be under warrantee).
    >
    >Hope any of this helps,
    >
    >>Gary Eickmeier

    >
    >Jerry


    Dang, I usually read threads from the bottom up, but went to the top today. I
    see you have already confirmed the plug-in sensor I thought I remembered, and
    made all the suggestions I followed with. Good job - for you, and not such a
    good one for me.

    Hunt
     
    Hunt, Aug 22, 2004
    #11
  12. Gary Eickmeier

    Hunt Guest

    In article <X%3Wc.37023$>,
    says...
    >
    >
    >
    >Jerry Shaw wrote:


    [SNIP]
    >
    >Thanks Jerry. I don't need a camera shop to take flash meter readings
    >from it, but I agree with you that it might be in the sensor. Just that
    >it is a brand new unit, and I have read another user who said his was
    >doing the same thing. Maybe I could wrangle another sensor out of
    >Vivitar. Two of them can't be bad or doing the same thing... could they?
    >
    >No camera shops locally have a 285 to play with.
    >
    >Gary Eickmeier


    If you can get a new sensor, also try for a few of the hot-shoe feet, as you
    will probably need them if you use the flash in pro situations. They used to
    require a little bit of soldering, but it was easy and would fix them right up
    again.

    Hunt
     
    Hunt, Aug 22, 2004
    #12
  13. Hunt wrote:

    > Dang, I usually read threads from the bottom up, but went to the top today. I
    > see you have already confirmed the plug-in sensor I thought I remembered, and
    > made all the suggestions I followed with. Good job - for you, and not such a
    > good one for me.


    OK, the results are in. I measured the output with my flash meter and
    compared the measured f-stop to the one indicated on the dial of the
    flash unit.

    The ISO was 80, the dial was set to 80, and the zoom head was on Normal.
    Here are the results:

    Purple: Calls for: f 11
    Measured: f 8

    Blue: Calls for: f 8
    Measured: f5.6

    Red: Calls for: f 4
    Measured: f3.5

    Yellow: Calls for: f 2
    Measured: f 2

    But my camera seems to want one more stop difference, such that in the
    purple range I would set f 5.6 and get good exposures.

    Any thoughts?

    Gary Eickmeier
     
    Gary Eickmeier, Aug 22, 2004
    #13
  14. Gary Eickmeier

    Charlie Self Guest

    noone notes:

    >If you can get a new sensor, also try for a few of the hot-shoe feet, as you
    >will probably need them if you use the flash in pro situations. They used to
    >require a little bit of soldering, but it was easy and would fix them right
    >up
    >again.


    Someone, some time made an aluminum replacement for that foot...I seem to
    recall them advertising in the smaller ad area in Shutterbug and maybe Pop.
    Photo as well. Be worth a look.

    Charlie Self
    "Bore, n.: A person who talks when you wish him to listen." Ambrose Bierce, The
    Devil's Dictionary
     
    Charlie Self, Aug 22, 2004
    #14
  15. Gary Eickmeier

    Canongirly Guest


    > Terrific thought, but... aren't you bothered at all by a manufacturer's
    > product that is off by TWO stops?
    >
    > Gary Eickmeier



    bothered...yes, surprised...no.
     
    Canongirly, Aug 22, 2004
    #15
  16. Gary Eickmeier

    Hunt Guest

    In article <0i8Wc.43231$>, geickmei@tampabay.
    rr.com says...
    >
    >
    >
    >Hunt wrote:
    >
    >> Dang, I usually read threads from the bottom up, but went to the top today.

    I
    >> see you have already confirmed the plug-in sensor I thought I remembered,

    and
    >> made all the suggestions I followed with. Good job - for you, and not such

    a
    >> good one for me.

    >
    >OK, the results are in. I measured the output with my flash meter and
    >compared the measured f-stop to the one indicated on the dial of the
    >flash unit.
    >
    >The ISO was 80, the dial was set to 80, and the zoom head was on Normal.
    >Here are the results:
    >
    >Purple: Calls for: f 11
    > Measured: f 8
    >
    >Blue: Calls for: f 8
    > Measured: f5.6
    >
    >Red: Calls for: f 4
    > Measured: f3.5
    >
    >Yellow: Calls for: f 2
    > Measured: f 2
    >
    >But my camera seems to want one more stop difference, such that in the
    >purple range I would set f 5.6 and get good exposures.
    >
    >Any thoughts?
    >
    >Gary Eickmeier


    Yes, always use Yellow! :-} No, seriously, I'd defer to Charlie Self's thought
    on the module being off in some way. Too bad that Vivitar will not address
    your problem.

    As an aside: I had responded to a question regarding the 285's sync cord.
    Please verify that I was correct for that poster. I said that it was a
    propriatary, very pointed mini-plug, where it connected to the unit. I was not
    aware that the 285 was still in production, but can easliy see why, as it was
    a workhorse unit - irrespective of the problem that you seem to be having with
    it. I also suppose that the sync cords are still being manufacutred by other
    companies for this unit. As I recall, he/she needed Vivitar 285 > PC, which
    should be common. I hate that I don't recall that stuff better.

    Good luck with your problem,
    Hunt

    PS I'll sleep on the 285 thought and see if anything else pops up.

    Quick thought - did the module use ND filters to set its readings of the light
    w/ various power ranges or a variable resistor? I keep trying to recall that
    module in detail.
     
    Hunt, Aug 23, 2004
    #16
  17. Gary Eickmeier

    Hunt Guest

    In article <8h1Wc.50886$>, geickmei@tampabay.
    rr.com says...

    Gary,

    I went to the Vivitar site, and looked at the PDF on the 285. One thing that
    caught my attention was the variable power switching. Your tests indicate that
    at full power, you are getting the greatest difference, and at, what, 1/8
    power, you are on track? I'd also think about that variability of power
    switching, as a possibility. Unfortunately, the site did not provide any
    useful images of the side and back of the unit.

    Again, good luck, and I'll keep thinking about your problem.

    Hunt
     
    Hunt, Aug 23, 2004
    #17
  18. Hunt wrote:


    > Gary,
    >
    > I went to the Vivitar site, and looked at the PDF on the 285. One thing that
    > caught my attention was the variable power switching. Your tests indicate that
    > at full power, you are getting the greatest difference, and at, what, 1/8
    > power, you are on track? I'd also think about that variability of power
    > switching, as a possibility. Unfortunately, the site did not provide any
    > useful images of the side and back of the unit.
    >
    > Again, good luck, and I'll keep thinking about your problem.


    Not sure what you are referring to when you say "your tests indicate." I
    did a test with my light meter on all four color ranges, and found the
    greatest difference with the purple setting (lowest f-stop), but I
    didn't test the manual control.

    Gary Eickmeier
     
    Gary Eickmeier, Aug 23, 2004
    #18
  19. Hunt wrote:

    > Yes, always use Yellow! :-} No, seriously, I'd defer to Charlie Self's thought
    > on the module being off in some way. Too bad that Vivitar will not address
    > your problem.


    What do you mean by that? I haven't been able to get a hold of them yet.
    >
    > As an aside: I had responded to a question regarding the 285's sync cord.
    > Please verify that I was correct for that poster. I said that it was a
    > propriatary, very pointed mini-plug, where it connected to the unit. I was not
    > aware that the 285 was still in production, but can easliy see why, as it was
    > a workhorse unit - irrespective of the problem that you seem to be having with
    > it. I also suppose that the sync cords are still being manufacutred by other
    > companies for this unit. As I recall, he/she needed Vivitar 285 > PC, which
    > should be common. I hate that I don't recall that stuff better.


    Yes, it is a peculiar small mini plug. Hard to pull out.
    >
    > Good luck with your problem,
    > Hunt
    >
    > PS I'll sleep on the 285 thought and see if anything else pops up.
    >
    > Quick thought - did the module use ND filters to set its readings of the light
    > w/ various power ranges or a variable resistor? I keep trying to recall that
    > module in detail.


    I don't know how it works.

    Gary Eickmeier
    >
     
    Gary Eickmeier, Aug 23, 2004
    #19
  20. Gary Eickmeier

    Jerry Shaw Guest

    Hunt,

    (Hunt) wrote:

    >As an aside: I had responded to a question regarding the 285's sync cord.
    >Please verify that I was correct for that poster. I said that it was a
    >propriatary, very pointed mini-plug, where it connected to the unit. I was not
    >aware that the 285 was still in production, but can easliy see why, as it was
    >a workhorse unit - irrespective of the problem that you seem to be having with
    >it. I also suppose that the sync cords are still being manufacutred by other
    >companies for this unit. As I recall, he/she needed Vivitar 285 > PC, which
    >should be common. I hate that I don't recall that stuff better.


    I have at least two non-Vivitar cords. They are both coiled. I'm pretty sure
    they are available in several different places, as I got mine in a Camera Show
    (or maybe I bought them as an accessory, quite a few years back).

    >Good luck with your problem,
    >Hunt


    >Quick thought - did the module use ND filters to set its readings of the light
    >w/ various power ranges or a variable resistor? I keep trying to recall that
    >module in detail.


    If I remember correctly, the sensor uses a plastic film to set the auto range.
    Rotating the dial rotates the film in front of the photo-sensor. However, the
    film is not ND. Instead, it actually has black dots printed on it, to block
    the light to varying degrees depending on the position of the dial. When in
    the manual mode, rotating the dial moves contacts that select different
    resistors inside the sensor head to select different power ratios.

    Jerry
     
    Jerry Shaw, Aug 23, 2004
    #20
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