vista

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Capt T, May 8, 2007.

  1. Capt T

    Capt T Guest

    i have a pent 2 with win 98 which i use excel for a/cs etc , Nero for cd
    writing, Camedia for photos etc and office 2000.

    I am about to order a dell package which comes with vista with no option for
    xp.

    I am told that Vista is not user friendly, not easy to use and that many win
    98 software wont work and that I would be better off with XP.

    Should i go for another manufacturer that still does XP..should I be
    concerned?

    Thanks for any opinions.
     
    Capt T, May 8, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Capt T

    Evan Platt Guest

    On Tue, 8 May 2007 20:38:20 +0100, "Capt T" <>
    wrote:

    >i have a pent 2 with win 98 which i use excel for a/cs etc , Nero for cd
    >writing, Camedia for photos etc and office 2000.
    >
    >I am about to order a dell package which comes with vista with no option for
    >xp.
    >
    >I am told that Vista is not user friendly, not easy to use and that many win
    >98 software wont work and that I would be better off with XP.
    >
    >Should i go for another manufacturer that still does XP..should I be
    >concerned?
    >
    >Thanks for any opinions.


    There's a lot of 98 software that won't work with XP either. Get with
    the 21st century.

    Go with the computer you like. You can always buy XP and install it
    yourself.
    --
    To reply via e-mail, remove The Obvious from my e-mail address.
     
    Evan Platt, May 8, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Capt T

    Gordon Guest

    "Capt T" <> wrote in message
    news:4640d317$...
    >i have a pent 2 with win 98 which i use excel for a/cs etc , Nero for cd
    > writing, Camedia for photos etc and office 2000.
    >
    > I am about to order a dell package which comes with vista with no option
    > for
    > xp.
    >
    > I am told that Vista is not user friendly, not easy to use and that many
    > win
    > 98 software wont work and that I would be better off with XP.
    >
    > Should i go for another manufacturer that still does XP..should I be
    > concerned?
    >
    > Thanks for any opinions.
    >
    >



    My wife and I bought a Dell laptop with Vista and to be honest we heard all
    the same rubbish as you did, we were over the moon to find that Vista works
    fine, its easy to use, its not slow at all, its friendly too, I find it very
    easy to use, ok a few different things in the menus but nothing you couldn't
    get used to after a mess around clicking on icons etc., just like we all did
    with XP (its almost the same as XP just more grand.)....
    I used to hear the same stuff when people moved from 98 to XP, infact from
    windows 3.1 to windows 95 was a big to do about nothing.

    Go for it and find out for yourself, it works great, if you do have old
    programs that won't install just right click on the install icon and tell it
    to run as XP mode and it will load up fine, well all of mine did.

    you will find others disagree with me, but its your choice.... Or!! you
    could buy a laptop and stick Linux on it which is stable, nice to look at
    and lots of add-on stuff, but then that's all you can do, nothing else worth
    a light can load on to it :)

    that's my advice and I am more than sure I am going to get lots of Microsoft
    haters telling you different.

    take care, good luck

    Gordon
     
    Gordon, May 8, 2007
    #3
  4. Capt T

    Another Guest

    >
    > My wife and I bought a Dell laptop with Vista and to be honest we heard all
    > the same rubbish as you did, we were over the moon to find that Vista works
    > fine, its easy to use, its not slow at all, its friendly too, I find it very
    > easy to use, ok a few different things in the menus but nothing you couldn't




    Here is the real problem with Vista.

    http://www.cs.auckland.ac.nz/~pgut001/pubs/vista_cost.html
     
    Another, May 8, 2007
    #4
  5. Capt T

    Gordon Guest

    "Another" <.> wrote in message
    news:77746$4640d7ea$1860e511$...
    >>
    >> My wife and I bought a Dell laptop with Vista and to be honest we heard
    >> all the same rubbish as you did, we were over the moon to find that Vista
    >> works fine, its easy to use, its not slow at all, its friendly too, I
    >> find it very easy to use, ok a few different things in the menus but
    >> nothing you couldn't

    >
    >
    >
    > Here is the real problem with Vista.
    >
    > http://www.cs.auckland.ac.nz/~pgut001/pubs/vista_cost.html


    when I started writing this review almost two months ago, I plotted out the
    how the review would be structured, in eight parts, and then immediately set
    out to write this final part first. I often write lengthy reviews out of
    order, which can get me in trouble if I get bogged down in the middle
    sections, but I knew I'd eventually finish this one up. After all, I didn't
    just spend the past five years of my life covering WindowsVista only to give
    up on the final review.

    Anyway, the point behind writing the conclusion first was that Microsoft
    had, at the time, just completed development of Windows Vista, and I had a
    bunch of thoughts about this product I wanted to unload. But you won't find
    the words I wrote in that original conclusion here. The reason? At the time,
    I was too focused on the negative aspects of the product's numerous delays,
    what I took to be Microsoft's inept handling of the development of Vista,
    and features the company had promised that weren't in the final version.

    Here's the thing. Over the course of actually reviewing Windows Vista, I've
    had to come face-to-face with features I'm quite familiar with, thanks to
    years of testing. But I wanted to approach this from a fresh perspective,
    and as I categorically moved through each of the numerous features in Vista,
    something occurred to me: None of my original complaints matter. Within
    several months, hundreds of millions of people around the globe will be
    using this operating system, and none of them--literally none--will care
    that it was delayed a few months at one time. They won't care that the
    original Sidebar and WinFS were stripped from the product in order to
    prevent further delays. And they certainly won't care that Microsoft
    reorganized its Windows division around a new team that will guide future
    product versions.

    No, what these people will care about is how this new Windows versions works
    compared to its predecessors. And it's funny, as I worked my way slowly
    through the enormous number of features in Windows Vista, I could see with
    new eyes that there's a lot there. No, there's no one major new
    gotta-have-it feature, though Vista's pervasive and amazing new security
    features come close. Vista is hard, maybe impossible to summarize on a
    three-bullet-point PowerPoint slide. There's just so much there.

    To arrive at a final score for Windows Vista, I thought about grading each
    and every feature and then averaging the total. I thought about developing a
    system that measured the worth of features to different customer groups and
    supplying different grades for different types of users. Heck, I had all
    kinds of ideas. But in the end, that's all pretty pointless. You're going to
    be using Windows Vista. It's just a question of time. And what I can tell
    you now, as 2006 dwindles away and the first year of Vista's wide scale
    availability begins, is that you're going to like Windows Vista. You're
    going to like it a lot.

    Vista is both broad and deep, with major new features and functionality.
    Architecturally, it's based on the NT platform that has provided the
    underpinnings of all mainstream Windows versions for more than a half
    decade. That suggests that Windows Vista is only an evolutionary upgrade
    over Windows XP. But don't be deceived: In Vista, Windows has been
    completely deconstructed and rebuilt as a more elegant componentized system
    that can be secured and deployed far more easily. The ramifications of this
    work will reach far into the future, but what all this means to me is that
    Windows Vista is a major Windows update that deserves your attention. It is,
    at turns, both revolutionary and evolutionary.

    Windows Vista: The good and bad
    Bad: Windows Vista ships in far too many product editions, requiring users
    to make hard decisions about which to get and, ultimately (pardon the pun)
    spend too much money to get all the features they want. For consumers, there
    are really only two choices: Vista Home Premium and Vista Ultimate. Both are
    expensive, but both are also feature-rich. To choose, simply look at the
    Ultimate features that aren't available in Home Premium and decide whether
    you can live without them.

    Good: On the other hand, Microsoft is now making previously niche features
    like Tablet PC support and Media Center available to a much bigger audience
    than ever before. More to the point, these features are now available in
    retail versions of Windows for the first time. I cannot imagine why they
    waited this long.

    Good: Windows Vista is easier and faster to install than ever before, and
    that's true if you're an individual user or a corporate admin seeking to
    deploy the system automatically across numerous desktops. Vista's
    componentized design makes this possible.

    Good: Vista is beautiful, and all that FUD you read about needing new
    hardware to run the Aero user interface is false. If you have a reasonably
    new PC (i.e. one that is less than two years old), Vista should run just
    fine, and it will look wonderful doing so.

    Bad: Like all Windows versions, Windows Vista is a memory hog, and you
    should take Microsoft's minimum RAM recommendations as the comedy they are.
    You will want at least 1 GB of RAM to run Windows Vista, and 2 GB is the
    sweet spot if you're a heavy multitasker like me, a gamer, or a frequent
    user of creativity applications. That said, RAM is cheap, so this isn't the
    huge problem some will make it out to be. But it is an inconvenience.

    Good: The Windows Vista user interface is a big improvement over that of XP,
    with integrated search features that really work. It's also instantly
    familiar, because it uses the same Start Menu/taskbar scheme you learned
    years ago. It's also a bit inconsistent at times. Microsoft needs help with
    fit and finish as always, though Vista is more solid in this regard than
    previous versions.

    Good: Windows Vista's security features are top-notch. It remains to be seen
    how this will play out in the real world, but my guess is we'll see a lot of
    security activity in the first quarter of 2007 and then things will settle
    right down. Microsoft did it right this time.

    Good: Windows Vista performs as well or better than Windows XP on identical,
    modern hardware. No, your Celeron M system isn't going to be a screamer. But
    let's be honest here. It never was.

    Good: Windows Vista is far more reliable than Windows XP, and its new
    instrumentation capabilities will help find and repair any problems that do
    arise more quickly.

    Good: Windows Vista provides exactly the Internet capabilities that users
    expect, with a dramatically improved version of Internet Explorer that is no
    embarrassment (like previous versions were).

    Bad: Friends don't let friends use Outlook Express, and despite the new
    name, Windows Mail is just Outlook Express.

    Good: Windows Calendar, Windows Sidebar, and the new Games Explorer (and
    games capabilities in general) are surprisingly solid additions to Windows
    and applications that you will definitely want to check out.

    Good: Windows Vista's digital media applications are generally excellent,
    especially the new Windows Photo Gallery and Windows Media Center.

    Bad: Microsoft is sending mixed messages by releasing a separate media
    player application called Zune. Also, the company should have learned from
    Windows Me that bare bones media applications like DVD Maker are a mistake
    that reflect poorly on Windows.

    Good: As you would expect, Windows Vista's networking capabilities are best
    of breed, thanks to a rewritten network stack and some well-considered UI
    work. Nice job there.

    Good: Windows Vista is a first-class mobility solution with amazing Tablet
    PC features, a new Mobility Center, touch screen support, and more.

    Bad: Windows Ultimate Extras should be made available to other Windows Vista
    users, at a price. Restricting these often-fluffy add-ons to only the most
    expensive Vista version is a slap in the face to users who can't afford
    Vista Ultimate.

    Good: Windows Speech Recognition. Seriously, check it out.

    Good: Windows Vista's hardware and software compatibility is excellent, and
    a major achievement.

    Bad: Wait a year on x64 unless you really know what you're doing. Niggling
    software compatibility issues will dog most users until developers get up to
    speed with x64-specific issues.

    Grading Windows Vista
    Looking at the list above, you might notice that the goods outweigh the
    "bads" by a considerable margin. You should also note that none of the items
    I've listed as "bad" are particularly horrible. This supports my notion that
    Windows Vista, taken as a whole, will be an overwhelmingly positive
    experience for most users.

    Should you upgrade? Yes, you should. I still prefer clean installs over
    upgrades, though Microsoft has made progress with refining the upgrade
    process, and of course you're going to get the absolute best experience
    buying a new PC with Vista preinstalled. If your computer is more than two
    years old, you should upgrade to a Vista PC as soon as possible. If you
    purchased an XP-based PC in 2006, try to get another year out of it. I can
    think of virtually no Microsoft customers that shouldn't consider Vista per
    se, though the cost of upgrading can certainly outweigh any potential
    benefits of doing so.

    Some have questioned the demand for Windows Vista. Though it's been five
    years in the making, I have a hard time imagining users queuing up at
    CompUSA at midnight on January 29 so they can be among the first to own the
    new system, as they did over a decade ago for Windows 95. Looking back, you
    should remember that Windows 95 was a sea change in that the world was
    moving to 32-bit computing. Even if Windows Vista were to offer a similar
    shift to 64-bit computing (and, arguably, it eventually will), that shift
    isn't as dramatic, since the mainstream 64-bit environment, x64, is an
    extension to the 32-bit technologies we've been using. So we're not going to
    see that level of upgrading across the board with Windows Vista. The world
    is just different now. That said, users should move to Vista more quickly
    than they did to XP.

    In conclusion, Windows Vista is both evolutionary and revolutionary, and I
    know it's great because every time I have to use Windows XP, I feel
    constrained and miss those Vista features I'm just now starting to take for
    granted. It's not perfect--what software is?--but it's a compelling and
    fascinating product that will delight you over time as you stumble onto new
    features. It's this "spontaneous smile" effect that I like so much about
    Windows Vista, and it stands in sharp contrast to the refined but stark and
    unfriendly world of Mac OS X and the raw, me-too copying of Linux. Windows
    Vista is a better operating system than the competition, for reasons that
    are both technical and practical. But for the hundreds of millions of people
    who will move to Vista in the coming years, all that will really matter is
    that it's a major improvement over Windows XP. And it most certainly is that
    as well.

    Highly recommended.
     
    Gordon, May 8, 2007
    #5
  6. Capt T

    Capt T Guest

    Thanks for all that Gordon think I will go ahead and take to Vista ..

    ++++++++++++++++++++


    "Gordon" <> wrote in message
    news:q150i.3466$...
    >
    > "Another" <.> wrote in message
    > news:77746$4640d7ea$1860e511$...
    > >>
    > >> My wife and I bought a Dell laptop with Vista and to be honest we heard
    > >> all the same rubbish as you did, we were over the moon to find that

    Vista
    > >> works fine, its easy to use, its not slow at all, its friendly too, I
    > >> find it very easy to use, ok a few different things in the menus but
    > >> nothing you couldn't

    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > Here is the real problem with Vista.
    > >
    > > http://www.cs.auckland.ac.nz/~pgut001/pubs/vista_cost.html

    >
    > when I started writing this review almost two months ago, I plotted out

    the
    > how the review would be structured, in eight parts, and then immediately

    set
    > out to write this final part first. I often write lengthy reviews out of
    > order, which can get me in trouble if I get bogged down in the middle
    > sections, but I knew I'd eventually finish this one up. After all, I

    didn't
    > just spend the past five years of my life covering WindowsVista only to

    give
    > up on the final review.
    >
    > Anyway, the point behind writing the conclusion first was that Microsoft
    > had, at the time, just completed development of Windows Vista, and I had a
    > bunch of thoughts about this product I wanted to unload. But you won't

    find
    > the words I wrote in that original conclusion here. The reason? At the

    time,
    > I was too focused on the negative aspects of the product's numerous

    delays,
    > what I took to be Microsoft's inept handling of the development of Vista,
    > and features the company had promised that weren't in the final version.
    >
    > Here's the thing. Over the course of actually reviewing Windows Vista,

    I've
    > had to come face-to-face with features I'm quite familiar with, thanks to
    > years of testing. But I wanted to approach this from a fresh perspective,
    > and as I categorically moved through each of the numerous features in

    Vista,
    > something occurred to me: None of my original complaints matter. Within
    > several months, hundreds of millions of people around the globe will be
    > using this operating system, and none of them--literally none--will care
    > that it was delayed a few months at one time. They won't care that the
    > original Sidebar and WinFS were stripped from the product in order to
    > prevent further delays. And they certainly won't care that Microsoft
    > reorganized its Windows division around a new team that will guide future
    > product versions.
    >
    > No, what these people will care about is how this new Windows versions

    works
    > compared to its predecessors. And it's funny, as I worked my way slowly
    > through the enormous number of features in Windows Vista, I could see with
    > new eyes that there's a lot there. No, there's no one major new
    > gotta-have-it feature, though Vista's pervasive and amazing new security
    > features come close. Vista is hard, maybe impossible to summarize on a
    > three-bullet-point PowerPoint slide. There's just so much there.
    >
    > To arrive at a final score for Windows Vista, I thought about grading each
    > and every feature and then averaging the total. I thought about developing

    a
    > system that measured the worth of features to different customer groups

    and
    > supplying different grades for different types of users. Heck, I had all
    > kinds of ideas. But in the end, that's all pretty pointless. You're going

    to
    > be using Windows Vista. It's just a question of time. And what I can tell
    > you now, as 2006 dwindles away and the first year of Vista's wide scale
    > availability begins, is that you're going to like Windows Vista. You're
    > going to like it a lot.
    >
    > Vista is both broad and deep, with major new features and functionality.
    > Architecturally, it's based on the NT platform that has provided the
    > underpinnings of all mainstream Windows versions for more than a half
    > decade. That suggests that Windows Vista is only an evolutionary upgrade
    > over Windows XP. But don't be deceived: In Vista, Windows has been
    > completely deconstructed and rebuilt as a more elegant componentized

    system
    > that can be secured and deployed far more easily. The ramifications of

    this
    > work will reach far into the future, but what all this means to me is that
    > Windows Vista is a major Windows update that deserves your attention. It

    is,
    > at turns, both revolutionary and evolutionary.
    >
    > Windows Vista: The good and bad
    > Bad: Windows Vista ships in far too many product editions, requiring users
    > to make hard decisions about which to get and, ultimately (pardon the pun)
    > spend too much money to get all the features they want. For consumers,

    there
    > are really only two choices: Vista Home Premium and Vista Ultimate. Both

    are
    > expensive, but both are also feature-rich. To choose, simply look at the
    > Ultimate features that aren't available in Home Premium and decide whether
    > you can live without them.
    >
    > Good: On the other hand, Microsoft is now making previously niche features
    > like Tablet PC support and Media Center available to a much bigger

    audience
    > than ever before. More to the point, these features are now available in
    > retail versions of Windows for the first time. I cannot imagine why they
    > waited this long.
    >
    > Good: Windows Vista is easier and faster to install than ever before, and
    > that's true if you're an individual user or a corporate admin seeking to
    > deploy the system automatically across numerous desktops. Vista's
    > componentized design makes this possible.
    >
    > Good: Vista is beautiful, and all that FUD you read about needing new
    > hardware to run the Aero user interface is false. If you have a reasonably
    > new PC (i.e. one that is less than two years old), Vista should run just
    > fine, and it will look wonderful doing so.
    >
    > Bad: Like all Windows versions, Windows Vista is a memory hog, and you
    > should take Microsoft's minimum RAM recommendations as the comedy they

    are.
    > You will want at least 1 GB of RAM to run Windows Vista, and 2 GB is the
    > sweet spot if you're a heavy multitasker like me, a gamer, or a frequent
    > user of creativity applications. That said, RAM is cheap, so this isn't

    the
    > huge problem some will make it out to be. But it is an inconvenience.
    >
    > Good: The Windows Vista user interface is a big improvement over that of

    XP,
    > with integrated search features that really work. It's also instantly
    > familiar, because it uses the same Start Menu/taskbar scheme you learned
    > years ago. It's also a bit inconsistent at times. Microsoft needs help

    with
    > fit and finish as always, though Vista is more solid in this regard than
    > previous versions.
    >
    > Good: Windows Vista's security features are top-notch. It remains to be

    seen
    > how this will play out in the real world, but my guess is we'll see a lot

    of
    > security activity in the first quarter of 2007 and then things will settle
    > right down. Microsoft did it right this time.
    >
    > Good: Windows Vista performs as well or better than Windows XP on

    identical,
    > modern hardware. No, your Celeron M system isn't going to be a screamer.

    But
    > let's be honest here. It never was.
    >
    > Good: Windows Vista is far more reliable than Windows XP, and its new
    > instrumentation capabilities will help find and repair any problems that

    do
    > arise more quickly.
    >
    > Good: Windows Vista provides exactly the Internet capabilities that users
    > expect, with a dramatically improved version of Internet Explorer that is

    no
    > embarrassment (like previous versions were).
    >
    > Bad: Friends don't let friends use Outlook Express, and despite the new
    > name, Windows Mail is just Outlook Express.
    >
    > Good: Windows Calendar, Windows Sidebar, and the new Games Explorer (and
    > games capabilities in general) are surprisingly solid additions to Windows
    > and applications that you will definitely want to check out.
    >
    > Good: Windows Vista's digital media applications are generally excellent,
    > especially the new Windows Photo Gallery and Windows Media Center.
    >
    > Bad: Microsoft is sending mixed messages by releasing a separate media
    > player application called Zune. Also, the company should have learned from
    > Windows Me that bare bones media applications like DVD Maker are a mistake
    > that reflect poorly on Windows.
    >
    > Good: As you would expect, Windows Vista's networking capabilities are

    best
    > of breed, thanks to a rewritten network stack and some well-considered UI
    > work. Nice job there.
    >
    > Good: Windows Vista is a first-class mobility solution with amazing Tablet
    > PC features, a new Mobility Center, touch screen support, and more.
    >
    > Bad: Windows Ultimate Extras should be made available to other Windows

    Vista
    > users, at a price. Restricting these often-fluffy add-ons to only the most
    > expensive Vista version is a slap in the face to users who can't afford
    > Vista Ultimate.
    >
    > Good: Windows Speech Recognition. Seriously, check it out.
    >
    > Good: Windows Vista's hardware and software compatibility is excellent,

    and
    > a major achievement.
    >
    > Bad: Wait a year on x64 unless you really know what you're doing. Niggling
    > software compatibility issues will dog most users until developers get up

    to
    > speed with x64-specific issues.
    >
    > Grading Windows Vista
    > Looking at the list above, you might notice that the goods outweigh the
    > "bads" by a considerable margin. You should also note that none of the

    items
    > I've listed as "bad" are particularly horrible. This supports my notion

    that
    > Windows Vista, taken as a whole, will be an overwhelmingly positive
    > experience for most users.
    >
    > Should you upgrade? Yes, you should. I still prefer clean installs over
    > upgrades, though Microsoft has made progress with refining the upgrade
    > process, and of course you're going to get the absolute best experience
    > buying a new PC with Vista preinstalled. If your computer is more than two
    > years old, you should upgrade to a Vista PC as soon as possible. If you
    > purchased an XP-based PC in 2006, try to get another year out of it. I can
    > think of virtually no Microsoft customers that shouldn't consider Vista

    per
    > se, though the cost of upgrading can certainly outweigh any potential
    > benefits of doing so.
    >
    > Some have questioned the demand for Windows Vista. Though it's been five
    > years in the making, I have a hard time imagining users queuing up at
    > CompUSA at midnight on January 29 so they can be among the first to own

    the
    > new system, as they did over a decade ago for Windows 95. Looking back,

    you
    > should remember that Windows 95 was a sea change in that the world was
    > moving to 32-bit computing. Even if Windows Vista were to offer a similar
    > shift to 64-bit computing (and, arguably, it eventually will), that shift
    > isn't as dramatic, since the mainstream 64-bit environment, x64, is an
    > extension to the 32-bit technologies we've been using. So we're not going

    to
    > see that level of upgrading across the board with Windows Vista. The world
    > is just different now. That said, users should move to Vista more quickly
    > than they did to XP.
    >
    > In conclusion, Windows Vista is both evolutionary and revolutionary, and I
    > know it's great because every time I have to use Windows XP, I feel
    > constrained and miss those Vista features I'm just now starting to take

    for
    > granted. It's not perfect--what software is?--but it's a compelling and
    > fascinating product that will delight you over time as you stumble onto

    new
    > features. It's this "spontaneous smile" effect that I like so much about
    > Windows Vista, and it stands in sharp contrast to the refined but stark

    and
    > unfriendly world of Mac OS X and the raw, me-too copying of Linux. Windows
    > Vista is a better operating system than the competition, for reasons that
    > are both technical and practical. But for the hundreds of millions of

    people
    > who will move to Vista in the coming years, all that will really matter is
    > that it's a major improvement over Windows XP. And it most certainly is

    that
    > as well.
    >
    > Highly recommended.
    >
    >
     
    Capt T, May 8, 2007
    #6
  7. Capt T

    Mr. Arnold Guest

    "Capt T" <> wrote in message
    news:4640d317$...
    >i have a pent 2 with win 98 which i use excel for a/cs etc , Nero for cd
    > writing, Camedia for photos etc and office 2000.
    >
    > I am about to order a dell package which comes with vista with no option
    > for
    > xp.
    >
    > I am told that Vista is not user friendly, not easy to use and that many
    > win
    > 98 software wont work and that I would be better off with XP.
    >
    > Should i go for another manufacturer that still does XP..should I be
    > concerned?
    >


    You'll find serveral Vista NG(s) and XP too, maybe even Win 9'x.

    news://msnews.microsoft.com/
     
    Mr. Arnold, May 8, 2007
    #7
  8. Capt T wrote:

    > Thanks for all that Gordon think I will go ahead and take to Vista ..


    Just don't complain when you can't play your favorite DVD and CD.

    --
    -bts
    -Motorcycles defy gravity; cars just suck
     
    Beauregard T. Shagnasty, May 9, 2007
    #8
  9. "Capt T" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thanks for all that Gordon think I will go ahead and take to Vista ..
    >
    > ++++++++++++++++++++
    >
    >
    > "Gordon" <> wrote in message
    > news:q150i.3466$...

    SNIP-----SNIP-------SNIP
    >>



    If you do find that there is some software that you need to run but that
    will not run under Vista you can always down load Virtual PC and install the
    required operating system in that.

    Microsoft Virtual PC
    http://www.microsoft.com/windows/products/winfamily/virtualpc/default.mspx
     
    GreenieLeBrun, May 9, 2007
    #9
  10. Capt T

    WhzzKdd Guest

    "GreenieLeBrun" <> wrote in message
    news:f1r2jb$sc8$...
    > "Capt T" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Thanks for all that Gordon think I will go ahead and take to Vista ..
    >>
    >> ++++++++++++++++++++
    >>
    >>
    >> "Gordon" <> wrote in message
    >> news:q150i.3466$...

    > SNIP-----SNIP-------SNIP
    >>>

    >
    >
    > If you do find that there is some software that you need to run but that
    > will not run under Vista you can always down load Virtual PC and install
    > the required operating system in that.
    >
    > Microsoft Virtual PC
    > http://www.microsoft.com/windows/products/winfamily/virtualpc/default.mspx
    >


    Dude! You made MY day! I can use that to VPN in to my office's Novell
    Netware network now on my new Vista laptop!
     
    WhzzKdd, May 9, 2007
    #10
  11. Capt T

    Guest

    "Capt T" <> wrote:

    >i have a pent 2 with win 98 which i use excel for a/cs etc , Nero for cd
    >writing, Camedia for photos etc and office 2000.
    >
    >I am about to order a dell package which comes with vista with no option for
    >xp.
    >
    >I am told that Vista is not user friendly, not easy to use and that many win
    >98 software wont work and that I would be better off with XP.
    >
    >Should i go for another manufacturer that still does XP..should I be
    >concerned?
    >
    >Thanks for any opinions.


    You can get a refund for Vista and purchase what you want.
    http://www.microsoft.com/mscorp/productrefund/refund.asp

    Vista is all about DRM, you really should read up on it, it's where
    all the cost and loss of user control comes in.

    If you don't need it for your work you don't need it.


    --
    Spam
    http://www.steelcitysfinest.com/Isuzu.htm
     
    , May 9, 2007
    #11
  12. On Tue, 08 May 2007 23:48:24 +0000, Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:

    > Capt T wrote:
    >
    >> Thanks for all that Gordon think I will go ahead and take to Vista ..

    >
    > Just don't complain when you can't play your favorite DVD and CD.


    It can also delete applications *without* warning
    The fine print in Vista give s M$ the right to *regularly* check
    their.....er.....your machine. If it suspects that some software is
    illegal, it will delete it *without* informing the user.
    Windows Defender actively scans for spyware/adware & any other unwanted
    software....doesn't specify *what* other software, that's up to M$ to
    determine. It can mistakenly remove software, & leave other applications
    totally useless.
    According to Peter Gutmann (University of Auckaland) who was doing
    research at the behest of Hollywood, Vista *deliberately* degrades
    picture quality of Blu-Ray & HD-DVD disks on most PC monitors.

    More here:
    http://www.cs.auckland.ac.nz/~pgut001/pubs/vista_cost.html
     
    William Poaster, May 9, 2007
    #12
  13. Capt T

    elaich Guest

    "Beauregard T. Shagnasty" <> wrote in news:c%
    70i.24$:

    >> Thanks for all that Gordon think I will go ahead and take to Vista ..

    >
    > Just don't complain when you can't play your favorite DVD and CD.


    Uncle Billy hasn't begun implementing that feature just yet. He's waiting
    until Vista becomes entrenched enough. Give it a few years before we begin
    see the howls from people who just visited Windows Update, and find that
    their computer has become the sole property of Microsoft, Inc.

    --
    A: Because it disturbs the logical flow of the message.
    Q: Why is top posting frowned upon?
     
    elaich, May 9, 2007
    #13
  14. Capt T

    Gordon Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Capt T" <> wrote:
    >
    >>i have a pent 2 with win 98 which i use excel for a/cs etc , Nero for cd
    >>writing, Camedia for photos etc and office 2000.
    >>
    >>I am about to order a dell package which comes with vista with no option
    >>for
    >>xp.
    >>
    >>I am told that Vista is not user friendly, not easy to use and that many
    >>win
    >>98 software wont work and that I would be better off with XP.
    >>
    >>Should i go for another manufacturer that still does XP..should I be
    >>concerned?
    >>
    >>Thanks for any opinions.

    >
    > You can get a refund for Vista and purchase what you want.
    > http://www.microsoft.com/mscorp/productrefund/refund.asp
    >
    > Vista is all about DRM, you really should read up on it, it's where
    > all the cost and loss of user control comes in.
    >
    > If you don't need it for your work you don't need it.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Spam
    > http://www.steelcitysfinest.com/Isuzu.htm


    That's ok CaptT,
    Just thought you should know the truth about Vista, its not perfect but
    what operating system is? it does do what everyday people want it to do
    (Games, work, surfing, videos, etc etc etc) also a small comment I noticed
    about DVD and CD's not playing well, properly or at all, well my friend, I
    took our laptop with me while I was working away and watched many DVD's,
    listened to CD's and all worked fine.

    Good luck
     
    Gordon, May 9, 2007
    #14
  15. Capt T

    Ron Martell Guest

    "Gordon" <> wrote:


    >Good: Windows Vista is easier and faster to install than ever before, and
    >that's true if you're an individual user or a corporate admin seeking to
    >deploy the system automatically across numerous desktops. Vista's
    >componentized design makes this possible.
    >


    Would be good if it were true.

    Here is what I encountered yesterday.

    A client asked me to set up his new notebook for him.

    Brand new Toshiba with a 1.86 ghz Celeron 440 and net 894 mb of RAM (1
    gb - 128 mb for video) running Vista Home Basic

    I turned the power on for the first time at 4:28 pm. At 5:12 pm,
    after 3 reboots, it got to the Vista desktop for the first time. Then
    it started downloading the updates.......

    Definitely not performance.

    Ron Martell Duncan B.C. Canada
    --
    Microsoft MVP (1997 - 2008)
    On-Line Help Computer Service
    http://onlinehelp.bc.ca
    Syberfix Remote Computer Repair

    "Anyone who thinks that they are too small to make a difference
    has never been in bed with a mosquito."
     
    Ron Martell, May 9, 2007
    #15
  16. Capt T

    Mr. Arnold Guest

    "Beauregard T. Shagnasty" <> wrote in message
    news:c%70i.24$...
    > Capt T wrote:
    >
    >> Thanks for all that Gordon think I will go ahead and take to Vista ..

    >
    > Just don't complain when you can't play your favorite DVD and CD.


    You want to explain this one, because I have not had a problem using any DVD
    or CD in the HP dv9000 laptop entertainment laptop, which I upgraded from
    Vista Home Premium to Ultimate. I also have not had a problem watching TV
    either on the laptop. :)
     
    Mr. Arnold, May 9, 2007
    #16
  17. Capt T

    Mr. Arnold Guest

    "Ron Martell" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > "Gordon" <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Good: Windows Vista is easier and faster to install than ever before, and
    >>that's true if you're an individual user or a corporate admin seeking to
    >>deploy the system automatically across numerous desktops. Vista's
    >>componentized design makes this possible.
    >>

    >
    > Would be good if it were true.
    >
    > Here is what I encountered yesterday.
    >
    > A client asked me to set up his new notebook for him.
    >
    > Brand new Toshiba with a 1.86 ghz Celeron 440 and net 894 mb of RAM (1
    > gb - 128 mb for video) running Vista Home Basic
    >
    > I turned the power on for the first time at 4:28 pm. At 5:12 pm,
    > after 3 reboots, it got to the Vista desktop for the first time. Then
    > it started downloading the updates.......
    >


    Here is my experience. I turned on the brand new HP dv9000 laptop running
    Home Premium. It booted like a champ one time, and then I downloaded the
    updates.

    Then I needed Ultimate for .Net development work on the PC. I did the
    upgrade to Ultimate. The upgrade ran like a champ, the reboot went like a
    champ and then I started the updates.

    I guess it's the luck of the draw.
     
    Mr. Arnold, May 9, 2007
    #17
  18. Capt T

    Aardvark Guest

    On Wed, 09 May 2007 19:37:00 +0000, Mr. Arnold wrote:

    >> Just don't complain when you can't play your favorite DVD and CD.

    >
    > You want to explain this one, because I have not had a problem using any
    > DVD or CD in the HP dv9000 laptop entertainment laptop, which I upgraded
    > from Vista Home Premium to Ultimate. I also have not had a problem
    > watching TV either on the laptop.


    I read all of the following page today. It might be advisable for you to
    at least scan what the writer has to say.

    http://www.cs.auckland.ac.nz/~pgut001/pubs/vista_cost.html

    --
    Registered Linux User 413057.
    Both Mandriva 2007 and Ubuntu 6.06
    You can have it all. My empire of hurt.
     
    Aardvark, May 9, 2007
    #18
  19. Capt T

    Another Guest

    >
    > That's ok CaptT,
    > Just thought you should know the truth about Vista, its not perfect but
    > what operating system is? it does do what everyday people want it to do
    > (Games, work, surfing, videos, etc etc etc) also a small comment I noticed
    > about DVD and CD's not playing well, properly or at all, well my friend, I
    > took our laptop with me while I was working away and watched many DVD's,
    > listened to CD's and all worked fine.
    >


    Based on the fact that you are replying to Pennywise with a message
    addressing CaptT, I'll take your analysis of Vista with a grain of salt.
     
    Another, May 9, 2007
    #19
  20. Aardvark wrote:

    > On Wed, 09 May 2007 19:37:00 +0000, Mr. Arnold wrote:
    > [Mr. Arnold did not write the following:]
    >>> Just don't complain when you can't play your favorite DVD and CD.

    >>
    >> You want to explain this one, because I have not had a problem using
    >> any DVD or CD in the HP dv9000 laptop entertainment laptop, which I
    >> upgraded from Vista Home Premium to Ultimate. I also have not had a
    >> problem watching TV either on the laptop.

    >
    > I read all of the following page today. It might be advisable for you
    > to at least scan what the writer has to say.
    >
    > http://www.cs.auckland.ac.nz/~pgut001/pubs/vista_cost.html


    There's another popular page about Vista and DRM - another essay-type
    page - but I can't find it at the moment. Link has been published
    several times in the last week. It also describes the problem with
    media, perhaps in an even easier to understand format. Do you remember
    it?

    --
    -bts
    -Motorcycles defy gravity; cars just suck
     
    Beauregard T. Shagnasty, May 9, 2007
    #20
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