vista Ultimate 32-bit to 64-bit

Discussion in 'Windows 64bit' started by Spartan117, May 22, 2008.

  1. Spartan117

    Spartan117 Guest

    Hello, I have two questions but the first affects the second so I thought I
    would put them all in one post.

    1) What is the difference between buying "windows vista ultimate upgrade"
    and "windows vista ultimate"?

    2)I have windows vista ultimate 32-bit edition, can I buy the windows vista
    ultimate 64-bit edition upgrade? Or do I have to buy the whole pack?
     
    Spartan117, May 22, 2008
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. 1. In order to use the upgrade license you must own another license for
    Windows that is eligible for upgrade to Vista, which you do. Ultimate is
    eligible for upgrade to Ultimate, odd as that may sound.

    2. You can buy an upgrade license for Ultimate to do what you want. You do
    not need a standard edition.

    Keep in mind that, unlike XP, there are no retail "upgrade" media. All
    retail x86 dvds are the same and all retail x64 dvds are the same. The
    "upgrade" and edition is controlled entirely by the product key.

    I take it by your question that your x86 Ultimate came preinstalled (OEM) on
    your computer and that is why you do not have an x64 dvd. If so, you do
    need to buy a retail copy of Ultimate, but it can be the upgrade edition.
    The product key you got with your computer is only good for the x86 Ultimate
    OEM that was preinstalled.

    When you buy an Ultimate upgrade edition you will get both the x86 and x64
    dvds and one product key. You may use the upgrade product key when
    upgrading from an OEM copy of x86 Ultimate to the retail x64 Ultimate just
    the same as if you were upgrading any other OEM or retail Windows.

    You will have to do a migration rather than an upgrade in place because an
    upgrade in place cannot be done from any x86 version of Windows to any x64
    version of Windows. A migration means a clean install of x64. You can
    transfer your files and settings with the Windows Easy Transfer wizard but
    you will have to reinstall your apps. An upgrade product key permits a
    clean installation of x64 Windows as long as the x86 product is on there at
    the time you start Setup.

    You need to download x64 drivers and utilities for your computer and have
    them on hand before starting.

    "Spartan117" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hello, I have two questions but the first affects the second so I thought
    > I
    > would put them all in one post.
    >
    > 1) What is the difference between buying "windows vista ultimate upgrade"
    > and "windows vista ultimate"?
    >
    > 2)I have windows vista ultimate 32-bit edition, can I buy the windows
    > vista
    > ultimate 64-bit edition upgrade? Or do I have to buy the whole pack?
     
    Colin Barnhorst, May 23, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Spartan117

    Jim Guest

    On May 22, 6:10 pm, "Colin Barnhorst" <> wrote:

    > Keep in mind that, unlike XP, there are no retail "upgrade" media.  All
    > retail x86 dvds are the same and all retail x64 dvds are the same.  The
    > "upgrade" and edition is controlled entirely by the product key.


    Colin,

    Are you certain you are correct here? I distinctly--but perhaps
    incorrectly--remember that I read on my Windows Ultimate Upgrade
    paperwork--that the upgrade will *only* install from an existing
    installation of Windows. The Upgrade DVD will *not* boot the machine
    cold, rather the Setup.exe must be run from within Windows. (That did
    not *sound* correct to me, but I do remember reading it.)

    I was able to boot my machine into x64 and then to run the Ultimate
    Vista 64-bit installation from it, but I never reformatted my drive
    and I never started "totally clean." I am using the new version of
    the Retail Vista Ultimate Upgrade 64-bit with SP1 installed.

    I am particularly interested in this question, because I have wondered
    what would happen were my entire operating system to fail. Would I
    then have to reinstall x64 before I could reinstall Vista?

    I would like to believe you are correct here, and I hope I am wrong;
    but my reading suggests that one must have a working version of an
    eligible version is necessary for the Upgrade DVD to work.

    Please tell me I am wrong. <g>

    Jim
     
    Jim, May 23, 2008
    #3
  4. Spartan117

    Mach58 Guest

    On Fri, 23 May 2008 04:20:26 -0700 (PDT), Jim
    <> wrote:

    >On May 22, 6:10 pm, "Colin Barnhorst" <> wrote:
    >
    >> Keep in mind that, unlike XP, there are no retail "upgrade" media.  All
    >> retail x86 dvds are the same and all retail x64 dvds are the same.  The
    >> "upgrade" and edition is controlled entirely by the product key.

    >
    >Colin,
    >
    >Are you certain you are correct here? I distinctly--but perhaps
    >incorrectly--remember that I read on my Windows Ultimate Upgrade
    >paperwork--that the upgrade will *only* install from an existing
    >installation of Windows. The Upgrade DVD will *not* boot the machine
    >cold, rather the Setup.exe must be run from within Windows. (That did
    >not *sound* correct to me, but I do remember reading it.)
    >
    >I was able to boot my machine into x64 and then to run the Ultimate
    >Vista 64-bit installation from it, but I never reformatted my drive
    >and I never started "totally clean." I am using the new version of
    >the Retail Vista Ultimate Upgrade 64-bit with SP1 installed.
    >
    >I am particularly interested in this question, because I have wondered
    >what would happen were my entire operating system to fail. Would I
    >then have to reinstall x64 before I could reinstall Vista?
    >
    >I would like to believe you are correct here, and I hope I am wrong;
    >but my reading suggests that one must have a working version of an
    >eligible version is necessary for the Upgrade DVD to work.
    >
    >Please tell me I am wrong. <g>
    >
    >Jim


    I believe, though I haven't personally tested it, that the
    "double-install" method still works. Starting with a blank HD,
    install Vista, but don't enter the serial number. Then, run setup
    from within Vista to "upgrade". This is the only way one can upgrade
    from any x86 windows to x64 Vista.

    Mach
     
    Mach58, May 23, 2008
    #4
  5. Time out.

    Forget everything you ever knew about Vista x86 Setup. It does not apply to
    Vista x64 Setup. They just don't work the same way. DO NOT, repeat, DO NOT
    work the same way. A quiz follows, so pay attention! :)

    This is how Vista x64 Setup works with an upgrade edition product key:

    On a computer with a 32bit Windows installed:

    You must boot the computer with the x64 dvd. You enter your upgrade edition
    product key. Setup then searches the computer for an existing Windows that
    is eligible for upgrade to Vista, which is any edition of Windows in the
    Vista Upgrade Matrix. When it finds an existing Windows then Setup simply
    proceeds. There is no message that you must run Setup from existing Windows
    like there is with x86 Setup.

    On a computer already running a 64bit Windows:

    The user may boot with the x64 dvd or may run Setup from the desktop of the
    existing Windows. A custom installation of Vista may be required, depending
    on the existing Windows.

    Details:

    There is no requirement to run x64 Setup from within an existing Windows
    like there is with x86 Setup for the simple reason that x64 Setup is a 64bit
    program and cannot run within an x86 desktop. MS assumes that users
    electing to install x64 Vista with an upgrade edition product key will be
    replacing an x86 edition of Windows (probably XP) or installing in parallel.

    As to doing a clean installation, keep the following in mind. Vista's disk
    tools are not available when you start Setup from a desktop because Setup is
    starting at Stage 2 of install. The disk tools are only available when you
    start Setup with Stage 1. That means to use the disk tools to manipulate
    partitions, format, and so on you must boot with the dvd to start Setup.
    Since you can run x64 Setup by booting with the dvd, even when using an
    upgrade edition product key, the disk tools are in fact available.

    Here is the key point. Once x64 Setup verifies the existing Windows on the
    computer the user is perfectly free to wipe out that existing Windows using
    the disk tools and perform a clean installation.

    It is not necessary to use an initial keyless installation in order to do a
    clean installation of Vista x64 with an upgrade edition product key. Just
    boot with the dvd.


    "Jim" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    On May 22, 6:10 pm, "Colin Barnhorst" <> wrote:

    > Keep in mind that, unlike XP, there are no retail "upgrade" media. All
    > retail x86 dvds are the same and all retail x64 dvds are the same. The
    > "upgrade" and edition is controlled entirely by the product key.


    Colin,

    Are you certain you are correct here? I distinctly--but perhaps
    incorrectly--remember that I read on my Windows Ultimate Upgrade
    paperwork--that the upgrade will *only* install from an existing
    installation of Windows. The Upgrade DVD will *not* boot the machine
    cold, rather the Setup.exe must be run from within Windows. (That did
    not *sound* correct to me, but I do remember reading it.)

    I was able to boot my machine into x64 and then to run the Ultimate
    Vista 64-bit installation from it, but I never reformatted my drive
    and I never started "totally clean." I am using the new version of
    the Retail Vista Ultimate Upgrade 64-bit with SP1 installed.

    I am particularly interested in this question, because I have wondered
    what would happen were my entire operating system to fail. Would I
    then have to reinstall x64 before I could reinstall Vista?

    I would like to believe you are correct here, and I hope I am wrong;
    but my reading suggests that one must have a working version of an
    eligible version is necessary for the Upgrade DVD to work.

    Please tell me I am wrong. <g>

    Jim
     
    Colin Barnhorst, May 23, 2008
    #5
  6. You are, fortunately, completely incorrect.

    There are two ways to migrate from 32bit Windows to 64bit Vista using an
    upgrade edition product key.

    1. Boot with the x64 dvd, enter the upgrade edition product key, then
    perform a custom installation of Vista in the partition containing the
    existing x86 Windows. Setup will roll up the existing Windows files into
    windows.old folders.

    2. Boot with the x64 dvd, enter the upgrade edition product key, then
    perform a custom installation of Vista in a different partition from
    existing Windows (parallel installation). This will set up a multi-boot
    configuration. You must have another Windows license eligible for upgrade
    to Vista in order remain in compliance with the Vista upgrade license. For
    example, you might have an old retail Windows 2000 sitting on a shelf that
    you haven't been using. As long as you never used it in another upgrade and
    it is not running on any computer this can be the license that is superceded
    by the Vista upgrade license. The W2k does not even have to be installed on
    the computer on which you are installing Vista in order for you to do this.
    This is an attractive option if your existing Windows came preinstalled on
    the computer and you want to continue to use it. If you didn't have such a
    license you can always buy one on eBay.

    "Mach58" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Fri, 23 May 2008 04:20:26 -0700 (PDT), Jim
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>On May 22, 6:10 pm, "Colin Barnhorst" <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Keep in mind that, unlike XP, there are no retail "upgrade" media. All
    >>> retail x86 dvds are the same and all retail x64 dvds are the same. The
    >>> "upgrade" and edition is controlled entirely by the product key.

    >>
    >>Colin,
    >>
    >>Are you certain you are correct here? I distinctly--but perhaps
    >>incorrectly--remember that I read on my Windows Ultimate Upgrade
    >>paperwork--that the upgrade will *only* install from an existing
    >>installation of Windows. The Upgrade DVD will *not* boot the machine
    >>cold, rather the Setup.exe must be run from within Windows. (That did
    >>not *sound* correct to me, but I do remember reading it.)
    >>
    >>I was able to boot my machine into x64 and then to run the Ultimate
    >>Vista 64-bit installation from it, but I never reformatted my drive
    >>and I never started "totally clean." I am using the new version of
    >>the Retail Vista Ultimate Upgrade 64-bit with SP1 installed.
    >>
    >>I am particularly interested in this question, because I have wondered
    >>what would happen were my entire operating system to fail. Would I
    >>then have to reinstall x64 before I could reinstall Vista?
    >>
    >>I would like to believe you are correct here, and I hope I am wrong;
    >>but my reading suggests that one must have a working version of an
    >>eligible version is necessary for the Upgrade DVD to work.
    >>
    >>Please tell me I am wrong. <g>
    >>
    >>Jim

    >
    > I believe, though I haven't personally tested it, that the
    > "double-install" method still works. Starting with a blank HD,
    > install Vista, but don't enter the serial number. Then, run setup
    > from within Vista to "upgrade". This is the only way one can upgrade
    > from any x86 windows to x64 Vista.
    >
    > Mach
     
    Colin Barnhorst, May 24, 2008
    #6
  7. Spartan117

    Jeff Gaines Guest

    On 23/05/2008 in message
    <> Colin Barnhorst wrote:

    >On a computer already running a 64bit Windows:
    >
    >The user may boot with the x64 dvd or may run Setup from the desktop of
    >the existing Windows. A custom installation of Vista may be required,
    >depending on the existing Windows.


    That is of particular interest.

    I run XP Pro x64 and I'm considering a move to Vista 64. Normally I would
    just do a clean install but I have MSFT Office and Access which have been
    activated, and would have to be activated again on a clean install. So it
    seems I could run Vista 64 from within XP x64 and my activation would be
    carried forward?

    --
    Jeff Gaines
    Damerham Hampshire UK
     
    Jeff Gaines, May 24, 2008
    #7
  8. Spartan117

    Jim Guest

    On May 23, 5:55 pm, "Colin Barnhorst" <> wrote:
    > Time out.
    >
    > Forget everything you ever knew about Vista x86 Setup.  It does not apply to
    > Vista x64 Setup.  They just don't work the same way.  DO NOT, repeat, DO NOT
    > work the same way.  A quiz follows, so pay attention!  :)
    >
    > This is how Vista x64 Setup works with an upgrade edition product key:
    >
    > On a computer with a 32bit Windows installed:
    >
    > You must boot the computer with the x64 dvd.  You enter your upgrade edition
    > product key.  Setup then searches the computer for an existing Windows that
    > is eligible for upgrade to Vista, which is any edition of Windows in the
    > Vista Upgrade Matrix.  When it finds an existing Windows then Setup simply
    > proceeds.  There is no message that you must run Setup from existing Windows
    > like there is with x86 Setup.
    >
    > On a computer already running a 64bit Windows:
    >
    > The user may boot with the x64 dvd or may run Setup from the desktop of the
    > existing Windows.  A custom installation of Vista may be required, depending
    > on the existing Windows.
    >
    > Details:
    >
    > There is no requirement to run x64 Setup from within an existing Windows
    > like there is with x86 Setup for the simple reason that x64 Setup is a 64bit
    > program and cannot run within an x86 desktop.  MS assumes that users
    > electing to install x64 Vista with an upgrade edition product key will be
    > replacing an x86 edition of Windows (probably XP) or installing in parallel.
    >
    > As to doing a clean installation, keep the following in mind.  Vista's disk
    > tools are not available when you start Setup from a desktop because Setup is
    > starting at Stage 2 of install.  The disk tools are only available when you
    > start Setup with Stage 1.  That means to use the disk tools to manipulate
    > partitions, format, and so on you must boot with the dvd to start Setup.
    > Since you can run x64 Setup by booting with the dvd, even when using an
    > upgrade edition product key, the disk tools are in fact available.
    >
    > Here is the key point.  Once x64 Setup verifies the existing Windows on the
    > computer the user is perfectly free to wipe out that existing Windows using
    > the disk tools and perform a clean installation.
    >
    > It is not necessary to use an initial keyless installation in order to do a
    > clean installation of Vista x64 with an upgrade edition product key.  Just
    > boot with the dvd.
    >

    Hi Colin,

    Thank you for the thorough and complete installation instructions. I
    wish I had known that *before* I insalled the product. This is one
    case where RTFM actually *hurt* me. <g>

    I wanted to do a completely "clean" install, and to reformat my array
    with the new install. I was not given that opportunity. Instead I
    ended up with a bunch of junk directories I did no want. At least a
    couple of them can not be deleted. Next time I will do it your way.

    I guess Microsoft just lies when they say the upgrade DVD is *not*
    bootable. I did no test it. I booted from the computer and then ran
    Setup.exe as they said.

    Thank you again!

    Jim
     
    Jim, May 24, 2008
    #8
  9. No. You will have to perform a custom installation. XP Pro x64 is in the
    upgrade matrix to Vista but an upgrade in place is not supported. See the
    Upgrade Options table at
    https://www.microsoft.com/windows/products/windowsvista/buyorupgrade/upgradepaths.mspx

    The yellow dots in the XP Pro x64 line mean that a custom install is
    required for upgrade to all editions of Vista, both x86 or x64. I think you
    will find that even when you start Setup for Vista x64 Business or Ultimate
    from your XP Pro x64 desktop the upgrade option will still be greyed out.
    The only time the upgrade option is enabled for an x64 version of Vista is
    when you are migrating to the same or higher x64 edition.

    You might as well start the x64 Setup by booting with the dvd so you can at
    least do a clean install. There is really no need to have to deal with the
    windows.old folders you would get with a custom install.

    "Jeff Gaines" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 23/05/2008 in message
    > <> Colin Barnhorst
    > wrote:
    >
    >>On a computer already running a 64bit Windows:
    >>
    >>The user may boot with the x64 dvd or may run Setup from the desktop of
    >>the existing Windows. A custom installation of Vista may be required,
    >>depending on the existing Windows.

    >
    > That is of particular interest.
    >
    > I run XP Pro x64 and I'm considering a move to Vista 64. Normally I would
    > just do a clean install but I have MSFT Office and Access which have been
    > activated, and would have to be activated again on a clean install. So it
    > seems I could run Vista 64 from within XP x64 and my activation would be
    > carried forward?
    >
    > --
    > Jeff Gaines
    > Damerham Hampshire UK
     
    Colin Barnhorst, May 26, 2008
    #9
  10. MS never says that the Vista dvds are not bootable. What they do say is
    that if you boot with the x86 dvd and then enter an upgrade edition product
    key you will have to exit Setup and run it from existing Windows. That only
    applies to x86 Setup and only to an upgrade edition product key. The dvds
    are all bootable because that is what you have to do to use the recovery
    tools.

    "Jim" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    On May 23, 5:55 pm, "Colin Barnhorst" <> wrote:
    > Time out.
    >
    > Forget everything you ever knew about Vista x86 Setup. It does not apply
    > to
    > Vista x64 Setup. They just don't work the same way. DO NOT, repeat, DO NOT
    > work the same way. A quiz follows, so pay attention! :)
    >
    > This is how Vista x64 Setup works with an upgrade edition product key:
    >
    > On a computer with a 32bit Windows installed:
    >
    > You must boot the computer with the x64 dvd. You enter your upgrade
    > edition
    > product key. Setup then searches the computer for an existing Windows that
    > is eligible for upgrade to Vista, which is any edition of Windows in the
    > Vista Upgrade Matrix. When it finds an existing Windows then Setup simply
    > proceeds. There is no message that you must run Setup from existing
    > Windows
    > like there is with x86 Setup.
    >
    > On a computer already running a 64bit Windows:
    >
    > The user may boot with the x64 dvd or may run Setup from the desktop of
    > the
    > existing Windows. A custom installation of Vista may be required,
    > depending
    > on the existing Windows.
    >
    > Details:
    >
    > There is no requirement to run x64 Setup from within an existing Windows
    > like there is with x86 Setup for the simple reason that x64 Setup is a
    > 64bit
    > program and cannot run within an x86 desktop. MS assumes that users
    > electing to install x64 Vista with an upgrade edition product key will be
    > replacing an x86 edition of Windows (probably XP) or installing in
    > parallel.
    >
    > As to doing a clean installation, keep the following in mind. Vista's disk
    > tools are not available when you start Setup from a desktop because Setup
    > is
    > starting at Stage 2 of install. The disk tools are only available when you
    > start Setup with Stage 1. That means to use the disk tools to manipulate
    > partitions, format, and so on you must boot with the dvd to start Setup.
    > Since you can run x64 Setup by booting with the dvd, even when using an
    > upgrade edition product key, the disk tools are in fact available.
    >
    > Here is the key point. Once x64 Setup verifies the existing Windows on the
    > computer the user is perfectly free to wipe out that existing Windows
    > using
    > the disk tools and perform a clean installation.
    >
    > It is not necessary to use an initial keyless installation in order to do
    > a
    > clean installation of Vista x64 with an upgrade edition product key. Just
    > boot with the dvd.
    >

    Hi Colin,

    Thank you for the thorough and complete installation instructions. I
    wish I had known that *before* I insalled the product. This is one
    case where RTFM actually *hurt* me. <g>

    I wanted to do a completely "clean" install, and to reformat my array
    with the new install. I was not given that opportunity. Instead I
    ended up with a bunch of junk directories I did no want. At least a
    couple of them can not be deleted. Next time I will do it your way.

    I guess Microsoft just lies when they say the upgrade DVD is *not*
    bootable. I did no test it. I booted from the computer and then ran
    Setup.exe as they said.

    Thank you again!

    Jim
     
    Colin Barnhorst, May 26, 2008
    #10
  11. Spartan117

    Jeff Gaines Guest

    On 26/05/2008 in message
    <> Colin Barnhorst wrote:

    >No. You will have to perform a custom installation. XP Pro x64 is in the
    >upgrade matrix to Vista but an upgrade in place is not supported. See the
    >Upgrade Options table at
    >https://www.microsoft.com/windows/products/windowsvista/buyorupgrade/upgradepaths.mspx


    I have a full version of Vista Ultimate, does that make a difference?

    >The yellow dots in the XP Pro x64 line mean that a custom install is
    >required for upgrade to all editions of Vista, both x86 or x64. I think
    >you will find that even when you start Setup for Vista x64 Business or
    >Ultimate from your XP Pro x64 desktop the upgrade option will still be
    >greyed out. The only time the upgrade option is enabled for an x64 version
    >of Vista is when you are migrating to the same or higher x64 edition.


    I may try that but I will ghost XP first just in case.


    >You might as well start the x64 Setup by booting with the dvd so you can
    >at least do a clean install. There is really no need to have to deal with
    >the windows.old folders you would get with a custom install.


    I would normally do that but having to re-activate Office is a PITA.

    --
    Jeff Gaines
    Damerham Hampshire UK
     
    Jeff Gaines, May 26, 2008
    #11
  12. There is no difference between an upgrade and standard edition of Vista
    except how Setup behaves and the licenses. You will have to install all
    your apps and activate any software that requires activation. It should
    activate over the internet in seconds. It is not normally a PITA. In any
    case, there is no choice so don't worry about it. When it comes up just do
    it. Even if you did have to use phone activation that is only a matter of
    five or ten minutes. Spend your time thinking about drivers, not
    activation.

    "Jeff Gaines" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 26/05/2008 in message
    > <> Colin Barnhorst
    > wrote:
    >
    >>No. You will have to perform a custom installation. XP Pro x64 is in the
    >>upgrade matrix to Vista but an upgrade in place is not supported. See the
    >>Upgrade Options table at
    >>https://www.microsoft.com/windows/products/windowsvista/buyorupgrade/upgradepaths.mspx

    >
    > I have a full version of Vista Ultimate, does that make a difference?
    >
    >>The yellow dots in the XP Pro x64 line mean that a custom install is
    >>required for upgrade to all editions of Vista, both x86 or x64. I think
    >>you will find that even when you start Setup for Vista x64 Business or
    >>Ultimate from your XP Pro x64 desktop the upgrade option will still be
    >>greyed out. The only time the upgrade option is enabled for an x64 version
    >>of Vista is when you are migrating to the same or higher x64 edition.

    >
    > I may try that but I will ghost XP first just in case.
    >
    >
    >>You might as well start the x64 Setup by booting with the dvd so you can
    >>at least do a clean install. There is really no need to have to deal with
    >>the windows.old folders you would get with a custom install.

    >
    > I would normally do that but having to re-activate Office is a PITA.
    >
    > --
    > Jeff Gaines
    > Damerham Hampshire UK
     
    Colin Barnhorst, May 26, 2008
    #12
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