VHS to DVD

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Jr., Dec 30, 2004.

  1. Jr.

    Jr. Guest

    My wife bought me a combo VHS/DVD recorder for Christmas.
    She wants me to get rid of my VHS tapes in favor of DVD's.
    My problem is that the DVD recorder will not dub copy protected materials.
    Other than copying the VHS on to another VHS and then recording on DVD is
    there a way around the copy protection?
    I own the VHS tapes and several of them are out of print so I am not doing
    anything wrong here.
     
    Jr., Dec 30, 2004
    #1
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  2. Jr.

    Shive Guest

    On Thu, 30 Dec 2004 16:56:14 +0000, Jr. wrote:

    > My wife bought me a combo VHS/DVD recorder for Christmas. She wants me to
    > get rid of my VHS tapes in favor of DVD's. My problem is that the DVD
    > recorder will not dub copy protected materials. Other than copying the VHS
    > on to another VHS and then recording on DVD is there a way around the copy
    > protection? I own the VHS tapes and several of them are out of print so I
    > am not doing anything wrong here.


    You have run afoul of the Congressional Macrovision scam. There are
    several ways around it, some easy, some expensive. There is no way to
    bypass the protection within the combo unit without some heavy
    engineering, but Macrovision is easy to defeat, otherwise. In fact, if
    you are an electronics hobbyist it can be bypassed with not much more than
    two paper clips, a diode and six inches of barbed wire (3 strand).

    I have never used a combo vcr/dvd unit, but I assume that the dvd has an
    external input and the vcr an external output. If not, you are screwed
    and will have to use separate units.

    Here we go.

    Feed the DVD from a macrovision free VCR. (First, you got to find or
    borrow one, usually either an old unit or one built to be sold in South
    America).

    Feed the DVD from your own VCR thru an old (pre-early-1990s) vcr. Many
    times these old vcrs will not pass on the macrovision signal. This
    works really well when it works. Some new TVs will work the same.

    Buy/borrow a sync restorer/MV remover and put between the VCR and the DVD.
    This always works but it always seems to me to lead to more picture
    degradation than the previous scheme.

    Feed the VCR through your PC input card and out to the DVD. (This
    won't work on some capture cards that have imbedded MV.)

    Feed the VCR to your Camera, save it, then out to your DVD (Depends on
    the camera).



    Now we get technical.

    Feed the VCR into your PC (Windows XP) and Hauppage TV card and capture
    it. Write to DVD via DVDShrink. Works really well.

    Or do the same with Linux using any one of multiple utilities. This is
    the one I used back when I cleaned out my collection of tapes.

    Of course, physics dictates that you will NEVER get the same quality of
    picture that you come to expect on a DVD, no matter how good the tape,
    recording, or player.

    Shive
     
    Shive, Dec 31, 2004
    #2
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  3. Jr.

    Jr. Guest

    Thanks
    What I did was purchase a buster and will hook my other VCR up to the DVD
    recorder and get my VHS's recorded that way.
    Thanks.
    "Shive" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > On Thu, 30 Dec 2004 16:56:14 +0000, Jr. wrote:
    >
    >> My wife bought me a combo VHS/DVD recorder for Christmas. She wants me to
    >> get rid of my VHS tapes in favor of DVD's. My problem is that the DVD
    >> recorder will not dub copy protected materials. Other than copying the
    >> VHS
    >> on to another VHS and then recording on DVD is there a way around the
    >> copy
    >> protection? I own the VHS tapes and several of them are out of print so I
    >> am not doing anything wrong here.

    >
    > You have run afoul of the Congressional Macrovision scam. There are
    > several ways around it, some easy, some expensive. There is no way to
    > bypass the protection within the combo unit without some heavy
    > engineering, but Macrovision is easy to defeat, otherwise. In fact, if
    > you are an electronics hobbyist it can be bypassed with not much more than
    > two paper clips, a diode and six inches of barbed wire (3 strand).
    >
    > I have never used a combo vcr/dvd unit, but I assume that the dvd has an
    > external input and the vcr an external output. If not, you are screwed
    > and will have to use separate units.
    >
    > Here we go.
    >
    > Feed the DVD from a macrovision free VCR. (First, you got to find or
    > borrow one, usually either an old unit or one built to be sold in South
    > America).
    >
    > Feed the DVD from your own VCR thru an old (pre-early-1990s) vcr. Many
    > times these old vcrs will not pass on the macrovision signal. This
    > works really well when it works. Some new TVs will work the same.
    >
    > Buy/borrow a sync restorer/MV remover and put between the VCR and the DVD.
    > This always works but it always seems to me to lead to more picture
    > degradation than the previous scheme.
    >
    > Feed the VCR through your PC input card and out to the DVD. (This
    > won't work on some capture cards that have imbedded MV.)
    >
    > Feed the VCR to your Camera, save it, then out to your DVD (Depends on
    > the camera).
    >
    >
    >
    > Now we get technical.
    >
    > Feed the VCR into your PC (Windows XP) and Hauppage TV card and capture
    > it. Write to DVD via DVDShrink. Works really well.
    >
    > Or do the same with Linux using any one of multiple utilities. This is
    > the one I used back when I cleaned out my collection of tapes.
    >
    > Of course, physics dictates that you will NEVER get the same quality of
    > picture that you come to expect on a DVD, no matter how good the tape,
    > recording, or player.
    >
    > Shive
     
    Jr., Dec 31, 2004
    #3
  4. Jr.

    MauiJNP Guest

    where did you get that and how much was it? thanks.


    "Jr." <> wrote in message
    news:79gBd.667373$D%.530385@attbi_s51...
    > Thanks
    > What I did was purchase a buster and will hook my other VCR up to the DVD
    > recorder and get my VHS's recorded that way.
    > Thanks.
    > "Shive" <> wrote in message
    > news:p...
    >> On Thu, 30 Dec 2004 16:56:14 +0000, Jr. wrote:
    >>
    >>> My wife bought me a combo VHS/DVD recorder for Christmas. She wants me
    >>> to
    >>> get rid of my VHS tapes in favor of DVD's. My problem is that the DVD
    >>> recorder will not dub copy protected materials. Other than copying the
    >>> VHS
    >>> on to another VHS and then recording on DVD is there a way around the
    >>> copy
    >>> protection? I own the VHS tapes and several of them are out of print so
    >>> I
    >>> am not doing anything wrong here.

    >>
    >> You have run afoul of the Congressional Macrovision scam. There are
    >> several ways around it, some easy, some expensive. There is no way to
    >> bypass the protection within the combo unit without some heavy
    >> engineering, but Macrovision is easy to defeat, otherwise. In fact, if
    >> you are an electronics hobbyist it can be bypassed with not much more
    >> than
    >> two paper clips, a diode and six inches of barbed wire (3 strand).
    >>
    >> I have never used a combo vcr/dvd unit, but I assume that the dvd has an
    >> external input and the vcr an external output. If not, you are screwed
    >> and will have to use separate units.
    >>
    >> Here we go.
    >>
    >> Feed the DVD from a macrovision free VCR. (First, you got to find or
    >> borrow one, usually either an old unit or one built to be sold in South
    >> America).
    >>
    >> Feed the DVD from your own VCR thru an old (pre-early-1990s) vcr. Many
    >> times these old vcrs will not pass on the macrovision signal. This
    >> works really well when it works. Some new TVs will work the same.
    >>
    >> Buy/borrow a sync restorer/MV remover and put between the VCR and the
    >> DVD.
    >> This always works but it always seems to me to lead to more picture
    >> degradation than the previous scheme.
    >>
    >> Feed the VCR through your PC input card and out to the DVD. (This
    >> won't work on some capture cards that have imbedded MV.)
    >>
    >> Feed the VCR to your Camera, save it, then out to your DVD (Depends on
    >> the camera).
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Now we get technical.
    >>
    >> Feed the VCR into your PC (Windows XP) and Hauppage TV card and capture
    >> it. Write to DVD via DVDShrink. Works really well.
    >>
    >> Or do the same with Linux using any one of multiple utilities. This is
    >> the one I used back when I cleaned out my collection of tapes.
    >>
    >> Of course, physics dictates that you will NEVER get the same quality of
    >> picture that you come to expect on a DVD, no matter how good the tape,
    >> recording, or player.
    >>
    >> Shive

    >
    >
     
    MauiJNP, Dec 31, 2004
    #4
  5. Jr.

    Jr. Guest

    Jr., Jan 1, 2005
    #5
  6. Jr.

    MauiJNP Guest

    thanks


    "Jr." <> wrote in message
    news:iHBBd.737750$mD.595215@attbi_s02...
    > $129.00 plus s&h
    >
    > www.facetvideo.com
    >
     
    MauiJNP, Jan 1, 2005
    #6
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