Vertical v. Horizontal Storage of DVDs?

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Thursdaynighters, Jul 7, 2004.

  1. I read (somewhere) that stacking dvds, in terms of long term storage, is worse
    for their useful lifespan than stacking them side by side (vertically), is this
    true?

    Tim
     
    Thursdaynighters, Jul 7, 2004
    #1
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  2. Thursdaynighters

    Confessor Guest

    (Thursdaynighters) wrote in
    news::

    > I read (somewhere) that stacking dvds, in terms of long term storage,
    > is worse for their useful lifespan than stacking them side by side
    > (vertically), is this true?


    I've heard the same thing, from several sources that appear to be
    reputable. The rationale most often cited is the incresed possibility of
    warping.
     
    Confessor, Jul 7, 2004
    #2
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  3. Thursdaynighters wrote:
    > I read (somewhere) that stacking dvds, in terms of long term storage, is worse
    > for their useful lifespan than stacking them side by side (vertically), is this
    > true?
    >
    > Tim


    Yes.......Why, you ask? Because if you stack them they will warp over
    time, even in their cases, according to experts. Ya see the sides will
    sag, from gravity and from downward pressure.

    --

    "If you examined a hundred people who had lost their faith in
    Christianity, I wonder how many of them would turn out to have reasoned
    out of it by honest argument? Do not most people simply drift away?"

    --C.S. Lewis
     
    Grand Inquisitor, Jul 7, 2004
    #3
  4. Grand Inquisitor () writes:
    > Thursdaynighters wrote:
    >> I read (somewhere) that stacking dvds, in terms of long term storage, is worse
    >> for their useful lifespan than stacking them side by side (vertically), is this
    >> true?
    >>
    >> Tim

    >
    > Yes.......Why, you ask? Because if you stack them they will warp over
    > time, even in their cases, according to experts. Ya see the sides will
    > sag, from gravity and from downward pressure.
    >

    But how much of this is real, and how much of it derives from a real problem
    when stacking records?

    Real records, ie 33 1/3 with grooves, if you stacked them so they were lying
    with the playing surface facing up, they actually saw the weight of the
    records above them. There is nothing isolating those records from the
    covers, and so the weight rests on the actual records.

    It's not the same thing with CDs and DVDs. With those, the cases actually
    hold the weight whatever's stacked above. The CDs and DVDs will never see
    the weight, no matter how much is stacked on them (well I suppose if
    you had enough weight it would start compressing the cases). It is a big
    difference.

    It strikes me that many do not know this difference, and might be
    trying to apply a real problem to a new medium where the problem does
    not exist.

    Michael
     
    Michael Black, Jul 7, 2004
    #4
  5. Thursdaynighters

    FPP Guest

    In article <Xns951EF27F276confessor@130.81.64.196>,
    Confessor <> wrote:

    > (Thursdaynighters) wrote in
    > news::
    >
    > > I read (somewhere) that stacking dvds, in terms of long term storage,
    > > is worse for their useful lifespan than stacking them side by side
    > > (vertically), is this true?

    >
    > I've heard the same thing, from several sources that appear to be
    > reputable. The rationale most often cited is the incresed possibility of
    > warping.


    Laserdiscs were very prone to this type of warping.

    The old solution was to put a heavy weight on top of a warped LD for a
    few days... and the few times I tried it, it did the trick.

    FPP

    --
    "Never judge a man till you've walked a mile in his shoes,
    because by then, you're a mile away, you've got his shoes,
    and you can say whatever the hell you want."
     
    FPP, Jul 7, 2004
    #5
  6. Thursdaynighters

    Joshua Zyber Guest

    "Michael Black" <> wrote in message
    news:ccfvkh$ccu$...
    > It strikes me that many do not know this difference, and might be
    > trying to apply a real problem to a new medium where the problem does
    > not exist.


    I agree. In almost two decades of stacking CDs, I've never had a problem
    with warpage. I doubt anyone else has either.

    Laserdiscs and LPs, now that's another matter.
     
    Joshua Zyber, Jul 7, 2004
    #6
  7. Thursdaynighters

    Stan Brown Guest

    "Thursdaynighters" <> wrote in
    alt.video.dvd:
    >I read (somewhere) that stacking dvds, in terms of long term storage, is worse
    >for their useful lifespan than stacking them side by side (vertically), is this
    >true?


    Here we go again.

    If only there were some sort of archive where previously asked
    questions could be searched for, and previous answers from the
    newsgroup could be found ...

    --
    Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Cortland County, New York, USA
    http://OakRoadSystems.com
    DVD FAQ: http://dvddemystified.com/dvdfaq.html
    other FAQs: http://oakroadsystems.com/genl/faqget.htm
     
    Stan Brown, Jul 7, 2004
    #7
  8. Thursdaynighters

    JFR Guest

    Michael Black wrote:
    >
    > Grand Inquisitor () writes:
    > > Thursdaynighters wrote:
    > >> I read (somewhere) that stacking dvds, in terms of long term storage, is worse
    > >> for their useful lifespan than stacking them side by side (vertically), is this
    > >> true?
    > >>
    > >> Tim

    > >
    > > Yes.......Why, you ask? Because if you stack them they will warp over
    > > time, even in their cases, according to experts. Ya see the sides will
    > > sag, from gravity and from downward pressure.
    > >

    > But how much of this is real, and how much of it derives from a real problem
    > when stacking records?
    >
    > Real records, ie 33 1/3 with grooves, if you stacked them so they were lying
    > with the playing surface facing up, they actually saw the weight of the
    > records above them. There is nothing isolating those records from the
    > covers, and so the weight rests on the actual records.
    >
    > It's not the same thing with CDs and DVDs. With those, the cases actually
    > hold the weight whatever's stacked above. The CDs and DVDs will never see
    > the weight, no matter how much is stacked on them (well I suppose if
    > you had enough weight it would start compressing the cases). It is a big
    > difference.
    >
    > It strikes me that many do not know this difference, and might be
    > trying to apply a real problem to a new medium where the problem does
    > not exist.
    >
    > Michael


    The problem has nothing to do with the weight of other cases above it.
    Rather it's the fact that the disc is supported only at the center while
    the edges are free standing and subject to sagging from gravity.

    JF
     
    JFR, Jul 7, 2004
    #8
  9. Thursdaynighters

    Dick Sidbury Guest

    JFR wrote:

    >
    > Michael Black wrote:
    >
    >>Grand Inquisitor () writes:
    >>
    >>>Thursdaynighters wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>I read (somewhere) that stacking dvds, in terms of long term storage, is worse
    >>>>for their useful lifespan than stacking them side by side (vertically), is this
    >>>>true?
    >>>>
    >>>>Tim
    >>>
    >>>Yes.......Why, you ask? Because if you stack them they will warp over
    >>>time, even in their cases, according to experts. Ya see the sides will
    >>>sag, from gravity and from downward pressure.
    >>>

    >>
    >>But how much of this is real, and how much of it derives from a real problem
    >>when stacking records?
    >>
    >>Real records, ie 33 1/3 with grooves, if you stacked them so they were lying
    >>with the playing surface facing up, they actually saw the weight of the
    >>records above them. There is nothing isolating those records from the
    >>covers, and so the weight rests on the actual records.
    >>
    >>It's not the same thing with CDs and DVDs. With those, the cases actually
    >>hold the weight whatever's stacked above. The CDs and DVDs will never see
    >>the weight, no matter how much is stacked on them (well I suppose if
    >>you had enough weight it would start compressing the cases). It is a big
    >>difference.
    >>
    >>It strikes me that many do not know this difference, and might be
    >>trying to apply a real problem to a new medium where the problem does
    >>not exist.
    >>
    >> Michael

    >
    >
    > The problem has nothing to do with the weight of other cases above it.
    > Rather it's the fact that the disc is supported only at the center while
    > the edges are free standing and subject to sagging from gravity.
    >
    > JF


    JF,
    Can you (or anyone else for that matter) cite a personal experience or a
    reference in which ANYONE has had a CD or a DVD warp from being stacked
    "horizontally" rather than vertically?

    dick
    -- Of course accessing DVDs is easier if they are "stacked" vertically.
     
    Dick Sidbury, Jul 7, 2004
    #9
  10. Thursdaynighters

    Stan Brown Guest

    "JFR" <JFR <"jeanfr"@$$$.ca>> wrote in alt.video.dvd:
    >The problem has nothing to do with the weight of other cases above it.
    >Rather it's the fact that the disc is supported only at the center while
    >the edges are free standing and subject to sagging from gravity.


    Maybe if you had them on the surface of a neutron star.

    But whatever gravity might be pulling at the edges when they're
    stacked horizontally, that same gravity is pulling at the ends when
    they're stacked vertically. If gravity is strong enough to deform
    them in the one case -- and for us earthlings I _highly_ doubt it --
    then it's strong enough to deform them in the other case, just in a
    different direction.

    This whole vertical/horizontal thing smacks of superstition,
    essentially saying that a DVD is the same as a vinyl record. We've
    had plenty of people post that they store theirs horizontally
    without a problem. Have you -- has _anyone_ -- ever had a problem
    storing them vertically?

    Other than the obvious, of course: it's harder to get one out of a
    horizontal stack.

    --
    Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Cortland County, New York, USA
    http://OakRoadSystems.com
    DVD FAQ: http://dvddemystified.com/dvdfaq.html
    other FAQs: http://oakroadsystems.com/genl/faqget.htm
     
    Stan Brown, Jul 7, 2004
    #10
  11. Thursdaynighters

    JFR Guest

    Dick Sidbury wrote:
    >
    > JFR wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > Michael Black wrote:
    > >
    > >>Grand Inquisitor () writes:
    > >>
    > >>>Thursdaynighters wrote:
    > >>>
    > >>>>I read (somewhere) that stacking dvds, in terms of long term storage, is worse
    > >>>>for their useful lifespan than stacking them side by side (vertically), is this
    > >>>>true?
    > >>>>
    > >>>>Tim
    > >>>
    > >>>Yes.......Why, you ask? Because if you stack them they will warp over
    > >>>time, even in their cases, according to experts. Ya see the sides will
    > >>>sag, from gravity and from downward pressure.
    > >>>
    > >>
    > >>But how much of this is real, and how much of it derives from a real problem
    > >>when stacking records?
    > >>
    > >>Real records, ie 33 1/3 with grooves, if you stacked them so they were lying
    > >>with the playing surface facing up, they actually saw the weight of the
    > >>records above them. There is nothing isolating those records from the
    > >>covers, and so the weight rests on the actual records.
    > >>
    > >>It's not the same thing with CDs and DVDs. With those, the cases actually
    > >>hold the weight whatever's stacked above. The CDs and DVDs will never see
    > >>the weight, no matter how much is stacked on them (well I suppose if
    > >>you had enough weight it would start compressing the cases). It is a big
    > >>difference.
    > >>
    > >>It strikes me that many do not know this difference, and might be
    > >>trying to apply a real problem to a new medium where the problem does
    > >>not exist.
    > >>
    > >> Michael

    > >
    > >
    > > The problem has nothing to do with the weight of other cases above it.
    > > Rather it's the fact that the disc is supported only at the center while
    > > the edges are free standing and subject to sagging from gravity.
    > >
    > > JF

    >
    > JF,
    > Can you (or anyone else for that matter) cite a personal experience or a
    > reference in which ANYONE has had a CD or a DVD warp from being stacked
    > "horizontally" rather than vertically?
    >
    > dick
    > -- Of course accessing DVDs is easier if they are "stacked" vertically.


    Oh, I'm not stating that such damage has or will happen with DVDs, just
    clarifying what could be the potential cause of such warpings. The
    diameter of DVDs is so much smaller than laserdics that I doubt the
    force on the edges would be sufficient to cause any damage. But I'd
    rather be safe than sorry.
     
    JFR, Jul 7, 2004
    #11
  12. Thursdaynighters

    diesel Guest


    >>>> Yes.......Why, you ask? Because if you stack them they will warp over
    >>>> time, even in their cases, according to experts. Ya see the sides will
    >>>> sag, from gravity and from downward pressure.


    Should we stack them (vertically of course) in line with the earth's
    rotation or perpendicular to it?

    And I've also heard that if you play a DVD more than a couple of dozen
    times the centrifugal forces will cause a disc to stretch.

    I think some 'experts' brains must have warped due to gravity.

    diesel
     
    diesel, Jul 7, 2004
    #12
  13. Thursdaynighters

    Jordan Lund Guest

    (Michael Black) wrote in message news:<ccfvkh$ccu$>...

    > It strikes me that many do not know this difference, and might be
    > trying to apply a real problem to a new medium where the problem does
    > not exist.


    I would tend to agree... it's like the whole "drink 8 glasses of water
    a day" thing... Someone tried to trace it back and couldn't find a
    single source that ID'd it as a reccomendation. It's one of those
    things that "everyone knows" that is not necessarily wrong, but it's
    not right either.

    (Source: Associated Press, 8/2002)

    http://www.detnews.com/2002/health/0208/20/a05-566143.htm

    - Jordan
     
    Jordan Lund, Jul 7, 2004
    #13
  14. Thursdaynighters

    poldy Guest

    In article <6EKGc.190030$>,
    Grand Inquisitor <> wrote:

    > Ya see the sides will
    > sag, from gravity and from downward pressure.


    Sag? You talking about DVDs or breasts?
     
    poldy, Jul 7, 2004
    #14
  15. Thursdaynighters

    Darkknight Guest

    Thursdaynighters wrote:
    > I read (somewhere) that stacking dvds, in terms of long term storage, is worse
    > for their useful lifespan than stacking them side by side (vertically), is this
    > true?
    >
    > Tim

    they said that about tapes a long time ago, theoretically correct but in
    a real world situation not relevent.
     
    Darkknight, Jul 13, 2004
    #15
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