Value of MCSD

Discussion in 'MCSD' started by Jake, Oct 26, 2003.

  1. Jake

    Jake Guest

    Considering the large number of sites on the web that now distribute exam
    questions, does the MCP/MCSD certification have any value any more? I know
    it definitely used to when it first came out but what about now?

    I'm using the Transcender pack to prepare for my exam. Doing the exam
    questions is great practice and helps me to learn about my subject in
    greater detail - something I can't do by simply reading. Doing questions
    tests my knowledge on lots of different areas and that is a good way of
    learning about my subject.

    The problem is that it is possible for people to learn the questions and
    answers by heart without really knowing the subject material in great
    detail. This undermines the whole certification.

    I really do want to survive in an increasingly competitive IT industry. I
    know employers value university degrees and other academic qualifications
    but apart from that how do you succeed? If a get an MCSD have I really got
    a better chance of getting a job? Or is experience still the main criteria?
     
    Jake, Oct 26, 2003
    #1
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  2. It has value, but mostly when combined with experience. By itself, it may
    get you noticed for entry-level positions.

    "Jake" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Considering the large number of sites on the web that now distribute exam
    > questions, does the MCP/MCSD certification have any value any more? I

    know
    > it definitely used to when it first came out but what about now?
    >
    > I'm using the Transcender pack to prepare for my exam. Doing the exam
    > questions is great practice and helps me to learn about my subject in
    > greater detail - something I can't do by simply reading. Doing questions
    > tests my knowledge on lots of different areas and that is a good way of
    > learning about my subject.
    >
    > The problem is that it is possible for people to learn the questions and
    > answers by heart without really knowing the subject material in great
    > detail. This undermines the whole certification.
    >
    > I really do want to survive in an increasingly competitive IT industry. I
    > know employers value university degrees and other academic qualifications
    > but apart from that how do you succeed? If a get an MCSD have I really

    got
    > a better chance of getting a job? Or is experience still the main

    criteria?
    >
    >
     
    Leigh Kendall, Oct 26, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Jake

    Paul Guest

    I would tend to agree.

    If you have some Univeristy/Acedmenic IT qualifications,
    some years of experience in the windows programming
    world, certifications will set you apart from other
    candidates as it is a great + on your resume.

    If you have no experience (just out of school), then it
    will still help you get that first job (again sets you
    apart from the other entry level resumes). In the entry
    level positions I do not beleive it has much effect
    starting salary levels, but like any qualification, it
    will help you go up the ladder a little farther and a
    little faster.



    >-----Original Message-----
    >It has value, but mostly when combined with experience.

    By itself, it may
    >get you noticed for entry-level positions.
    >
     
    Paul, Oct 27, 2003
    #3
  4. Here's my thoughts on the value of MCSD etc. to me... What I really want to
    do is to learn how to use C#, MS SQL, Win 2003 etc. properly. I usually
    design my own solution, then try to figure out how to implement it with the
    tools that I am aware. I have a big upcoming project where I'll need .NET,
    MS SQL etc., so I'm thinking preparing for the certs will give me a good and
    (relatively) quick idea of the best ways to implement what I need to
    implement. I'm hoping that studying for the certs will focus me on the
    stuff I really need to know, and save me from doing stuff the 'wrong' way.
    Right now I doubt any cert will help my income level. I think I read that
    as I become certified, I can display the certs on my company's website. I'm
    thinking this may help our customers have more confidence in our solutions,
    but this is really just an added bonus.

    I (we) may be in a position to hire someone(s) in a few months. I would
    probably value a university degree or experince over an MS certifcation in a
    candidate. Experience would be a major factor. However, I'd strongly
    consider hiring someone really hungry to learn new stuff. The technologies
    change so fast that any certification might not mean so much in a couple of
    years. What will be important is to have someone that will re-certify (or
    at least keep leaning) as new technologies evolve. Too many people seem
    happy to learn something and stick to only that as long as they can. I'd
    probably also consider someone who was a co-op student (university, college,
    and/or tech school). There are financial benefits to this that would make
    it worthwhile to give someone new (i.e. little experience) a chance to prove
    themselves. In a co-op situation, a person that new the technologies
    already (i.e. had a MS certification) would probably have the edge - but
    they'd really have to impress me they wanted to keep learning new stuff.


    "Paul" <> wrote in message
    news:01e401c39c23$c20790d0$...
    > I would tend to agree.
    >
    > If you have some Univeristy/Acedmenic IT qualifications,
    > some years of experience in the windows programming
    > world, certifications will set you apart from other
    > candidates as it is a great + on your resume.
    >
    > If you have no experience (just out of school), then it
    > will still help you get that first job (again sets you
    > apart from the other entry level resumes). In the entry
    > level positions I do not beleive it has much effect
    > starting salary levels, but like any qualification, it
    > will help you go up the ladder a little farther and a
    > little faster.
    >
    >
    >
    > >-----Original Message-----
    > >It has value, but mostly when combined with experience.

    > By itself, it may
    > >get you noticed for entry-level positions.
    > >

    >
     
    Chris Pettingill, Oct 27, 2003
    #4
  5. Jake

    gobi Guest

    Hi Chris,
    I like what you've said. You have similar attitude as me. I'm already 20
    years in computers and I took my first exam in 1994. However, I realised
    quickly that exams for exams had no meaning. I was running my own company at
    that time and exams had no meaning for my customers (Central Europe). I
    decided to concentrate on my company's certificates. I've stopped my
    personal certification for 9 years and I invested all time and money to
    learning and applying new technologies. It's really crazy speed of changes,
    everybody knows. I'm asking myself very often if there is any real reason
    for that ... However, I did not take exams for 9 years and now I'm in the
    position when I have knowledge, I have experience, but I cannot prove it to
    easily. I have to say, that I'm already in Germany and don't have my own
    company here. At least, not now. That is, I decided to complete MCSD quickly
    to have an icon for my resumes. Ironically, when I'm looking for a new job
    in Germany now, I'm getting very often the answer that I'm "over-qualified".
    Means, could be even worse with MCSD :))) However, it will not stop me in
    learning new things. I think that it's primary. Certification is secondary.
    I hope that it'll be worth time and money, but who knows. I also see it as a
    way to push myself to proceed as quickly as possible. We're lazy creatures
    by nature, you know :)
    Drop a message when you'll look for new staff, maybe ;)



    "Chris Pettingill" <> wrote in message
    news:#...
    > Here's my thoughts on the value of MCSD etc. to me... What I really want

    to
    > do is to learn how to use C#, MS SQL, Win 2003 etc. properly. I usually
    > design my own solution, then try to figure out how to implement it with

    the
    > tools that I am aware. I have a big upcoming project where I'll need

    ..NET,
    > MS SQL etc., so I'm thinking preparing for the certs will give me a good

    and
    > (relatively) quick idea of the best ways to implement what I need to
    > implement. I'm hoping that studying for the certs will focus me on the
    > stuff I really need to know, and save me from doing stuff the 'wrong' way.
    > Right now I doubt any cert will help my income level. I think I read that
    > as I become certified, I can display the certs on my company's website.

    I'm
    > thinking this may help our customers have more confidence in our

    solutions,
    > but this is really just an added bonus.
    >
    > I (we) may be in a position to hire someone(s) in a few months. I would
    > probably value a university degree or experince over an MS certifcation in

    a
    > candidate. Experience would be a major factor. However, I'd strongly
    > consider hiring someone really hungry to learn new stuff. The

    technologies
    > change so fast that any certification might not mean so much in a couple

    of
    > years. What will be important is to have someone that will re-certify (or
    > at least keep leaning) as new technologies evolve. Too many people seem
    > happy to learn something and stick to only that as long as they can. I'd
    > probably also consider someone who was a co-op student (university,

    college,
    > and/or tech school). There are financial benefits to this that would make
    > it worthwhile to give someone new (i.e. little experience) a chance to

    prove
    > themselves. In a co-op situation, a person that new the technologies
    > already (i.e. had a MS certification) would probably have the edge - but
    > they'd really have to impress me they wanted to keep learning new stuff.
    >
    >
    > "Paul" <> wrote in message
    > news:01e401c39c23$c20790d0$...
    > > I would tend to agree.
    > >
    > > If you have some Univeristy/Acedmenic IT qualifications,
    > > some years of experience in the windows programming
    > > world, certifications will set you apart from other
    > > candidates as it is a great + on your resume.
    > >
    > > If you have no experience (just out of school), then it
    > > will still help you get that first job (again sets you
    > > apart from the other entry level resumes). In the entry
    > > level positions I do not beleive it has much effect
    > > starting salary levels, but like any qualification, it
    > > will help you go up the ladder a little farther and a
    > > little faster.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > >-----Original Message-----
    > > >It has value, but mostly when combined with experience.

    > > By itself, it may
    > > >get you noticed for entry-level positions.
    > > >

    > >

    >
    >
     
    gobi, Oct 28, 2003
    #5
  6. Jake

    Jake Guest

    I think you're right. An extra certification will only get you a little
    farther a bit faster. Most employers are cautious about who they employ
    because the quality of their software is heavily dependent on the skills of
    their developers. Therefore they will view any certification in a positive
    way. However, it will only help at the job application stage. After
    landing a job you are expected to perform.

    Personally, having done the study for my MCP exam has been really beneficial
    for me because I have gained a much better understanding of my field.

    "Paul" <> wrote in message
    news:01e401c39c23$c20790d0$...
    > I would tend to agree.
    >
    > If you have some Univeristy/Acedmenic IT qualifications,
    > some years of experience in the windows programming
    > world, certifications will set you apart from other
    > candidates as it is a great + on your resume.
    >
    > If you have no experience (just out of school), then it
    > will still help you get that first job (again sets you
    > apart from the other entry level resumes). In the entry
    > level positions I do not beleive it has much effect
    > starting salary levels, but like any qualification, it
    > will help you go up the ladder a little farther and a
    > little faster.
    >
    >
    >
    > >-----Original Message-----
    > >It has value, but mostly when combined with experience.

    > By itself, it may
    > >get you noticed for entry-level positions.
    > >

    >
     
    Jake, Oct 28, 2003
    #6
  7. Jake

    andytby Guest

    Frankly speaking, in the past 3 years I have no certificate in hand at
    all, after study and sit for my first exam I realized that the
    certification really gave me an overall view and the proper way to write
    a good software.



    3 years ago, I don't even know how to write a COM, isn't it rediculous?
    most of my coding is on ASP page and call the SQL statement via ODBC
    DSN, it take time to process and no security at all.



    Until last year, I started to study and aim for MCSD and MCSD.NET, then
    I fully discover what is MSMQ, MTS, COM, COM+, DCOM, BCP, and the latest
    technology like Web Services, and many more.



    I believe that at the current stage, there are still a lot of people in
    my country like fresh graduates, junior programmer, or even senior
    programmer, they still don't know how to code COM+ and place in MMC.



    Personally speaking, I gained a lot knowledge via MCSD for my
    professional field, my position work as senior consultant need to
    deliver perfect solution to my client, without MCSD, I am nothing!



    By the way, I still have 4 more papers to go, just pass my 1st exam
    70-306. :)


    --
    Posted via http://dbforums.com
     
    andytby, Oct 29, 2003
    #7
  8. Jake

    Kline Sphere Guest

    >By itself, it may
    >get you noticed for entry-level positions.


    Not without a degree.
     
    Kline Sphere, Oct 30, 2003
    #8
  9. Jake

    Jaime Guest

    lol
    "Kline Sphere" <-> wrote in message
    news:...
    > >By itself, it may
    > >get you noticed for entry-level positions.

    >
    > Not without a degree.
     
    Jaime, Oct 30, 2003
    #9
  10. Yes, I'd tend to agree... A B.S. <g> would be helpful.

    "Kline Sphere" <-> wrote in message
    news:...
    > >By itself, it may
    > >get you noticed for entry-level positions.

    >
    > Not without a degree.
     
    Leigh Kendall, Oct 30, 2003
    #10
  11. Jake

    Kline Sphere Guest

    >Yes, I'd tend to agree... A B.S. <g> would be helpful.

    Or better still, an MSc!
     
    Kline Sphere, Oct 30, 2003
    #11
  12. Pardon my ignorance... what is MSc??

    "Kline Sphere" <-> wrote in message
    news:...
    > >Yes, I'd tend to agree... A B.S. <g> would be helpful.

    >
    > Or better still, an MSc!
     
    Leigh Kendall, Oct 31, 2003
    #12
  13. Masters (of Science) I think. Generally this would be a 2 year degree taken
    after a 4 year undergrad (i.e Honors of Science) degree at University.
    (Well that's what it is here in Canada anyway).


    "Leigh Kendall" <> wrote in message
    news:uEef%...
    > Pardon my ignorance... what is MSc??
    >
    > "Kline Sphere" <-> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > >Yes, I'd tend to agree... A B.S. <g> would be helpful.

    > >
    > > Or better still, an MSc!

    >
     
    Chris Pettingill, Oct 31, 2003
    #13
  14. Ahh... figured it was a Masters of some sort. Right, couldn't put: Masters
    B.S. That would be too funny...


    "Chris Pettingill" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Masters (of Science) I think. Generally this would be a 2 year degree

    taken
    > after a 4 year undergrad (i.e Honors of Science) degree at University.
    > (Well that's what it is here in Canada anyway).
    >
    >
    > "Leigh Kendall" <> wrote in message
    > news:uEef%...
    > > Pardon my ignorance... what is MSc??
    > >
    > > "Kline Sphere" <-> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > > > >Yes, I'd tend to agree... A B.S. <g> would be helpful.
    > > >
    > > > Or better still, an MSc!

    > >

    >
    >
     
    Leigh Kendall, Oct 31, 2003
    #14
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