vacuum

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by martin, Aug 19, 2005.

  1. martin

    martin Guest

    If someone accidentally touched the mobo of a computer with a vacuum
    cleaner,when the computer was on, how much damage would that do?
    Its not mine, and I have booting problems.
     
    martin, Aug 19, 2005
    #1
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  2. martin

    Vanguard Guest

    A normal vacuum creates a static electric charge due to the rushing of air
    into the nozzle. Touching the vaccumm to another surface can cause a
    discharge. You don't care if you zap your carpet but you do care about
    zapping your computer. Vacuums designed to use on computers which are
    static-free are very expensive and hard to find. Also, those mini-vacuums
    you see sold for computers are for use ONLY on the keyboard, monitor, or
    other external parts since they also generate static.

    --
    __________________________________________________
    E-mail: Remove "NIX" and add "#LAH" to Subject.
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    "martin" <> wrote in message
    news:1124458502.e26884b1f7c71b03a6c556e9304c0d23@teranews...
    > If someone accidentally touched the mobo of a computer with a vacuum
    > cleaner,when the computer was on, how much damage would that do?
    > Its not mine, and I have booting problems.
    >
     
    Vanguard, Aug 19, 2005
    #2
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  3. martin

    Vanguard Guest

    A normal vacuum creates a static electric charge due to the rushing of air
    into the nozzle. Touching the vacuum to another surface can cause a
    discharge. You don't care if you zap your carpet but you do care about
    zapping your computer. Vacuums designed to use on computers which are
    static-free are very expensive and hard to find. Also, those mini-vacuums
    you see sold for computers are for use ONLY on the keyboard, monitor, or
    other external parts since they also generate static.

    --
    __________________________________________________
    E-mail: Remove "NIX" and add "#LAH" to Subject.
    __________________________________________________
    "martin" <> wrote in message
    news:1124458502.e26884b1f7c71b03a6c556e9304c0d23@teranews...
    > If someone accidentally touched the mobo of a computer with a vacuum
    > cleaner,when the computer was on, how much damage would that do?
    > Its not mine, and I have booting problems.
    >
     
    Vanguard, Aug 19, 2005
    #3
  4. martin

    Vanguard Guest

    A normal vacuum creates a static electric charge due to the rushing of air
    into the nozzle. Touching the vacuum to another surface can cause a
    discharge. You don't care if you zap your carpet but you do care about
    zapping your computer. Vacuums designed to use on computers which are
    static-free are very expensive and hard to find. Also, those mini-vacuums
    you see sold for computers are for use ONLY on the keyboard, monitor, or
    other external parts since they also generate static.

    --
    __________________________________________________
    E-mail: Remove "NIX" and add "#LAH" to Subject.
    __________________________________________________
    "martin" <> wrote in message
    news:1124458502.e26884b1f7c71b03a6c556e9304c0d23@teranews...
    > If someone accidentally touched the mobo of a computer with a vacuum
    > cleaner,when the computer was on, how much damage would that do?
    > Its not mine, and I have booting problems.
    >
     
    Vanguard, Aug 19, 2005
    #4
  5. martin

    Mr Moonlight Guest

    It may be all over.

    --
    See my website:
    http://www.MoonlightElectric.com
    Support Our Troops
    "martin" <> wrote in message
    news:1124458502.e26884b1f7c71b03a6c556e9304c0d23@teranews...
    > If someone accidentally touched the mobo of a computer with a vacuum
    > cleaner,when the computer was on, how much damage would that do?
    > Its not mine, and I have booting problems.
    >
     
    Mr Moonlight, Aug 21, 2005
    #5
  6. martin

    Tom Guest

    On Fri, 19 Aug 2005 08:55:36 -0500, "Vanguard"
    <> wrote:

    | A normal vacuum creates a static electric charge due to the rushing of air
    | into the nozzle. Touching the vacuum to another surface can cause a
    | discharge. You don't care if you zap your carpet but you do care about
    | zapping your computer. Vacuums designed to use on computers which are
    | static-free are very expensive and hard to find. Also, those mini-vacuums
    | you see sold for computers are for use ONLY on the keyboard, monitor, or
    | other external parts since they also generate static.

    OMG :-O

    I won't be vacuuming my computer parts anymore.
    Thanks for that information (even though I wasn't the one to ask).
     
    Tom, Aug 28, 2005
    #6
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