Using a polarizing filter

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by AK, Jul 21, 2004.

  1. AK

    AK Guest

    I've been using a COZO brand circular polarizing filter on a Nikon D70 for
    outdoor shots, and am puzzled by the way the sky often appears almost gray
    rather than, say, a brighter blue. I think I'm aligning it properly, as the
    clouds stand out as expected. I then have to use the "levels" command in PS
    to get the colors and brightness back to what I would expect.

    Is this the usual situation, or am I doing something wrong - e.g., should I
    increase the exposure by a an f-stop or alter the white balance, etc to get
    this right in camera?

    Thanks

    Alan
    AK, Jul 21, 2004
    #1
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  2. Does it matter Alan?

    You seem to have found a good solution that works for you - stick with it

    Artie

    "AK" <> wrote in
    message news:LguLc.21886$...
    > I've been using a COZO brand circular polarizing filter on a Nikon D70

    for
    > outdoor shots, and am puzzled by the way the sky often appears almost gray
    > rather than, say, a brighter blue. I think I'm aligning it properly, as

    the
    > clouds stand out as expected. I then have to use the "levels" command in

    PS
    > to get the colors and brightness back to what I would expect.
    >
    > Is this the usual situation, or am I doing something wrong - e.g., should

    I
    > increase the exposure by a an f-stop or alter the white balance, etc to

    get
    > this right in camera?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Alan
    >
    >
    Arte Phacting, Jul 21, 2004
    #2
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  3. AK

    Paul H. Guest

    "AK" <> wrote in
    message news:LguLc.21886$...
    > I've been using a COZO brand circular polarizing filter on a Nikon D70

    for
    > outdoor shots, and am puzzled by the way the sky often appears almost gray
    > rather than, say, a brighter blue. I think I'm aligning it properly, as

    the
    > clouds stand out as expected. I then have to use the "levels" command in

    PS
    > to get the colors and brightness back to what I would expect.
    >
    > Is this the usual situation, or am I doing something wrong - e.g., should

    I
    > increase the exposure by a an f-stop or alter the white balance, etc to

    get
    > this right in camera?


    A good polarizer shouldn't alter the white balance, but it wouldn't hurt to
    change the WB if you have any doubts.

    How are you metering your shots? If you're spot-metering off the clouds and
    using a polarizer, then the normally blue sky would be *very* dark, as your
    metering would put the clouds at 18% grey and adjust everything else
    accordingly and clouds are often _very_ bright, meaning other things are
    relatively much darker. When I use a polarizer and take pictures in which
    clouds are the predominant feature, I sometimes meter off the clouds and
    bump up the exposure compensation somewhere between +1/3 and +2 EV,
    depending on the particular effect I'm trying to achieve.


    Next time you load one of your darker photos into Photoshop, take a look at
    its histogram--that'll give you some guidance about compensation.
    Paul H., Jul 21, 2004
    #3
  4. AK

    Paul H. Guest

    "Arte Phacting" <> wrote in message
    news:fkwLc.791$...
    > Does it matter Alan?
    >
    > You seem to have found a good solution that works for you - stick with it
    >
    > Artie


    Yes, it matters: Underexposed digital photos contain more noise than
    properly-exposed photos and sometimes essential detail is lost in the
    shadows, too. IMHO, it's best to push the exposure histogram as much to the
    right as possible (without blowing out too much detail, of course)-- this
    will give you the most room for post-processing and achieving good prints.
    Paul H., Jul 21, 2004
    #4
  5. AK wrote:
    > I've been using a COZO brand circular polarizing filter on a Nikon
    > D70 for outdoor shots, and am puzzled by the way the sky often
    > appears almost gray rather than, say, a brighter blue. I think I'm
    > aligning it properly, as the clouds stand out as expected. I then
    > have to use the "levels" command in PS to get the colors and
    > brightness back to what I would expect.
    >
    > Is this the usual situation, or am I doing something wrong - e.g.,
    > should I increase the exposure by a an f-stop or alter the white
    > balance, etc to get this right in camera?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Alan


    It would appear to me that you don't have a polarizing filter problem
    but have a white balance/exposure problem. The Polarizing filter should not
    be causing the problem, but rather the subject matter after the polarizing
    filter is applied may be giving your camera a problem and you may want to
    work with the white balance and exposure.

    --
    Joseph E. Meehan

    26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
    Joseph Meehan, Jul 21, 2004
    #5
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