User's computer is hosed

Discussion in 'Windows 64bit' started by John Aldrich, Feb 4, 2010.

  1. John Aldrich

    John Aldrich Guest

    I'm working on a computer for one of my users (I'm the IT Manager for
    a small carpet company) and the user brought his home PC for me to
    work on in my own time, stating that it was "messed up." The symptoms
    are as follows -- internet/network doesn't work, even when the network
    cable is plugged in. It's extremely sluggish, despite being a 64-bit
    version of Windows 7 Home Premium with 6 Gigs of ram. Also, it won't
    recognize a USB memory stick plugged into it. When I created an
    account for myself on his computer, it just hung at "customizing
    preferences..." when I tried to log into my new account. The system
    *will* recognize a USB memory stick when I boot into safe mode, but
    not in normal mode.

    I removed the redundant antivirus that the user installed after he
    bought the computer a couple weeks ago and have run a couple anti-
    virus/anti-malware scans and really found nothing of note. I also
    reset the TCP/IP stack.

    This morning the user came in and advised that he's installed a
    wireless remote control for his PC as well as the Media Center
    extensions and that is when everything went to pot.

    Wondering if the Media Center extensions could be the cause of the
    problem and if I remove them, will the system come back up?

    If anyone has any suggestions, please feel free to let me know. If you
    have a suggestion for a better group, I'm all ears.
     
    John Aldrich, Feb 4, 2010
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. I would start by wiping the computer and reinstalling the OS, given that
    it's a new computer. The OEM undoubtedly has a recovery DVD for the purpose.
    Use safe mode to pull off any critical data files to USB stick. (do NOT
    insert that USB stick into any of your own computers without thorougly
    scanning and isolating it. )

    Now, disable and remove as much of the crudeware as you can find on the
    recovered PC. Especially Norton if it's there. (You may need to download
    crudeware clean up tools for this. Norton is one of the toughest to
    completely remove but some others may be problematic as well. But GIYF and
    there are specific cleanup tools or instructions for most of this stuff.)

    Finally, since this is a home PC, install Windows Security Essentials for an
    AV. It's clean and fast.

    --
    Charlie.
    http://msmvps.com/blogs/russel




    "John Aldrich" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I'm working on a computer for one of my users (I'm the IT Manager for
    > a small carpet company) and the user brought his home PC for me to
    > work on in my own time, stating that it was "messed up." The symptoms
    > are as follows -- internet/network doesn't work, even when the network
    > cable is plugged in. It's extremely sluggish, despite being a 64-bit
    > version of Windows 7 Home Premium with 6 Gigs of ram. Also, it won't
    > recognize a USB memory stick plugged into it. When I created an
    > account for myself on his computer, it just hung at "customizing
    > preferences..." when I tried to log into my new account. The system
    > *will* recognize a USB memory stick when I boot into safe mode, but
    > not in normal mode.
    >
    > I removed the redundant antivirus that the user installed after he
    > bought the computer a couple weeks ago and have run a couple anti-
    > virus/anti-malware scans and really found nothing of note. I also
    > reset the TCP/IP stack.
    >
    > This morning the user came in and advised that he's installed a
    > wireless remote control for his PC as well as the Media Center
    > extensions and that is when everything went to pot.
    >
    > Wondering if the Media Center extensions could be the cause of the
    > problem and if I remove them, will the system come back up?
    >
    > If anyone has any suggestions, please feel free to let me know. If you
    > have a suggestion for a better group, I'm all ears.
     
    Charlie Russel - MVP, Feb 4, 2010
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. John Aldrich

    csiemers Guest

    I believe the Media Center extensions are used with a Windows Home Server.


    "David B." <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    > What exactly does the customer mean by "Media Center extensions"? AFAIK
    > there is no such thing that needs to be installed in Windows 7, is it an
    > add-on of some sort?
    >
    > --
     
    csiemers, Feb 4, 2010
    #3
  4. John Aldrich

    Graham Guest

    Charlie Russel - MVP wrote:
    > I would start by wiping the computer and reinstalling the OS, given that
    > it's a new computer. The OEM undoubtedly has a recovery DVD for the
    > purpose.


    These days, quite likely not. You often have to create them yourself
    from the running system, or order and pay for them. It's a good idea to
    make it the first thing you do of course. Current Thinkpads can create a
    W7 recovery USB drive, but it needs at least a 16GB USB drive to do it.

    Graham.
     
    Graham, Feb 4, 2010
    #4
  5. Goes to show. I never buy OEM licenses, except if a laptop comes with it.
    Then I get the lowest / cheapest one I can and use my own copies of Windows
    7 Ultimate or Enterprise, depending on which machine it is.

    The OEM has an obligation to provide SOME way to recover. Or media to do it.
    Or the actual OEM media. (this last almost never happens.) Some of those
    ways may require the user to have actually done something (like burn a DVD
    or USB stick.) But however it has to be done, the only way I would touch
    this machine is to wipe it.

    --
    Charlie.
    http://msmvps.com/blogs/russel




    "Graham" <> wrote in message
    news:u%...
    > Charlie Russel - MVP wrote:
    >> I would start by wiping the computer and reinstalling the OS, given that
    >> it's a new computer. The OEM undoubtedly has a recovery DVD for the
    >> purpose.

    >
    > These days, quite likely not. You often have to create them yourself from
    > the running system, or order and pay for them. It's a good idea to make it
    > the first thing you do of course. Current Thinkpads can create a W7
    > recovery USB drive, but it needs at least a 16GB USB drive to do it.
    >
    > Graham.
     
    Charlie Russel - MVP, Feb 4, 2010
    #5
  6. John Aldrich

    Bob AZ Guest


    > If anyone has any suggestions, please feel free to let me know. If you
    > have a suggestion for a better group, I'm all ears.


    John

    When I get a PC like this to "fix" I call it/them a confused PC.
    Usually it is the operator who confuses the PC by not operating it
    correctly. Yes things can be done to confuse the best of the PCs.

    My usual corrective action for a confused PC is to use the mouse to
    close everything down. This may take a while. THEN turn it off
    correctly by going to Start, Turn Off Computer and so forth. May take
    a few times but this has worked at least 5 times this last year.
    Defragging may also be called for. A few times this has been necessary
    it has taken a few times to get Defrag to go all the way. But
    eventually it will.

    Short of anything else a wipe and reinstall is called for. Make sure
    the drive is indeed clean so there is nothing left to reconfuse the
    PC.

    Hope this helps
    Bob AZ
     
    Bob AZ, Feb 5, 2010
    #6
  7. John Aldrich

    Graham Guest

    Charlie Russel - MVP wrote:
    > But however it has to be done, the only way I
    > would touch this machine is to wipe it.


    Can't disagree with that! And preferably reload it without the standard
    crapware supplied by the OEM. Anything actually useful can be downloaded
    and re-installed seperately.
     
    Graham, Feb 5, 2010
    #7
  8. John Aldrich

    John Aldrich Guest

    On Feb 4, 9:43 am, "Charlie Russel - MVP"
    <> wrote:
    > I would start by wiping the computer and reinstalling the OS, given that
    > it's a new computer. The OEM undoubtedly has a recovery DVD for the purpose.
    > Use safe mode to pull off any critical data files to USB stick. (do NOT
    > insert that USB stick into any of your own computers without thorougly
    > scanning and isolating it. )
    >
    > Now, disable and remove as much of the crudeware as you can find on the
    > recovered PC. Especially Norton if it's there. (You may need to download
    > crudeware clean up tools for this. Norton is one of the toughest to
    > completely remove but some others may be problematic as well. But GIYF and
    > there are specific cleanup tools or instructions for most of this stuff.)
    >
    > Finally, since this is a home PC, install Windows Security Essentials for an
    > AV. It's clean and fast.
    >

    Thanks. I actually ran VipreRescue in safe mode and it cleaned one
    item. Then I ran MalwareBytes in safe mode and it found something else
    -- some sort of Desktop Hijacker or something. Then I reset the TCP/IP
    stack and voila! everything started working. I downloaded SpyBot S&D
    as well as updating Malware Bytes and neither of them found anything
    else. I did, of course, remove Norton and ran their cleanup tool. I
    installed Vipre Home for the user as we have a bunch of free 1-year
    licenses for that. :)
     
    John Aldrich, Feb 6, 2010
    #8
  9. John Aldrich

    John Aldrich Guest

    On Feb 4, 12:13 pm, "Peter B. Steiger" <>
    wrote:
    > On Thu, 04 Feb 2010 06:20:43 -0800, John Aldrich sez:
    >
    > > If anyone has any suggestions, please feel free to let me know. If you
    > > have a suggestion for a better group, I'm all ears.

    >
    > This fixes PC performance issues, even totally unresponsive OS problems,
    > every time:http://www.ubuntu.com/
    >
    > Just sayin'...
    >

    ROFL! :) I'm a linux guy myself. I just make a living supporting
    Windows. :) I managed to clean the PC, though... it's all good. :)
     
    John Aldrich, Feb 6, 2010
    #9
  10. John Aldrich

    John Aldrich Guest

    On Feb 4, 1:09 pm, "Charlie Russel - MVP"
    <> wrote:
    > Goes to show. I never buy OEM licenses, except if a laptop comes with it.
    > Then I get the lowest / cheapest one I can and use my own copies of Windows
    > 7 Ultimate or Enterprise, depending on which machine it is.
    >
    > The OEM has an obligation to provide SOME way to recover. Or media to do it.
    > Or the actual OEM media. (this last almost never happens.) Some of those
    > ways may require the user to have actually done something (like burn a DVD
    > or USB stick.) But however it has to be done, the only way I would touch
    > this machine is to wipe it.
    >

    The machine in question actually came with a recovery partition. Don't
    know if there's a way to make restore disks from that or not. But, now
    that it's cleaned and back in the user' posession, the point is
    moot. :)
     
    John Aldrich, Feb 6, 2010
    #10
  11. John Aldrich

    John Aldrich Guest

    On Feb 5, 1:18 am, Bob AZ <> wrote:
    > > If anyone has any suggestions, please feel free to let me know. If you
    > > have a suggestion for a better group, I'm all ears.

    >
    > John
    >
    > When I get a PC like this to "fix" I call it/them a confused PC.
    > Usually it is the operator who confuses the PC by not operating it
    > correctly. Yes things can be done to confuse the best of the PCs.
    >
    > My usual corrective action for a confused PC is to use the mouse to
    > close everything down. This may take a while. THEN turn it off
    > correctly by going to Start, Turn Off Computer and so forth. May take
    > a few times but this has worked at least 5 times this last year.
    > Defragging may also be called for. A few times this has been necessary
    > it has taken a few times to get Defrag to go all the way. But
    > eventually it will.
    >
    > Short of anything else a wipe and reinstall is called for. Make sure
    > the drive is indeed clean so there is nothing left to reconfuse the
    > PC.
    >

    Actually, Bob, it was clearly infested with something. VipreRescue
    (http://live.sunbeltsoftware.com) cleaned something off it and then
    MalwareBytes got rid of something else and after resetting the TCP/IP
    stack yet again, everything was groovy again. :)
     
    John Aldrich, Feb 6, 2010
    #11
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. =?Utf-8?B?Qm9iIFMu?=

    Simple file sharing hosed?

    =?Utf-8?B?Qm9iIFMu?=, Apr 3, 2005, in forum: Wireless Networking
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    447
    =?Utf-8?B?Qm9iIFMu?=
    Apr 3, 2005
  2. Tony Rice

    bookmarks on the toolbar hosed

    Tony Rice, Nov 26, 2003, in forum: Firefox
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    634
    Derald
    Jan 25, 2004
  3. Bill F
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    379
    Rik Bain
    Dec 9, 2003
  4. Bill F
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    491
    Bill F
    Dec 16, 2003
  5. Replies:
    1
    Views:
    1,805
    CiscoHeadsetAdapter.com
    Feb 7, 2006
Loading...

Share This Page