Username and Password with WPA ???

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by =?Utf-8?B?Um91Z2huZWNr?=, Oct 11, 2006.

  1. I set up our first home network about 2 weeks ago and selected WPA-PSK
    security/encryption. As I recall, all I had to do was enter an encryption
    key on each PC--I was never prompted for username or password info. But in
    looking through a book printed in 2004, titled "Guide to Home Networking"
    (Les Freed at PC Magazine), Les says:

    "WPA is similar to WEP, but WPA combines encryption with user
    authentication... Instead of using a shared encryption key, WPA first
    requires users to identify themselves with a user name and password. If the
    users passes the authentication test, the AP sends the user a unique key that
    is valid for a limited period of time. The data connection between the
    user's PC and the AP is encrypted using the temporary key."

    Les doesn't distinguish between WPA-PSK and WPA2 in this book--perhaps
    that's because of when the book was printed. Do his statements only apply to
    WPA2, or did I miss something in my WPA-PSK setup?
    --
    So much to learn... So little time.
     
    =?Utf-8?B?Um91Z2huZWNr?=, Oct 11, 2006
    #1
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  2. Hi
    There is no differences between WPA2 or WPA setup. You can use WPA2 provided
    that both the source (Wireless Rouer/Access Point) are supporting WPA2, and
    your Windows was upgraded to SP2.
    Jack (MVP-Networking).

    "Roughneck" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I set up our first home network about 2 weeks ago and selected WPA-PSK
    > security/encryption. As I recall, all I had to do was enter an encryption
    > key on each PC--I was never prompted for username or password info. But
    > in
    > looking through a book printed in 2004, titled "Guide to Home Networking"
    > (Les Freed at PC Magazine), Les says:
    >
    > "WPA is similar to WEP, but WPA combines encryption with user
    > authentication... Instead of using a shared encryption key, WPA first
    > requires users to identify themselves with a user name and password. If
    > the
    > users passes the authentication test, the AP sends the user a unique key
    > that
    > is valid for a limited period of time. The data connection between the
    > user's PC and the AP is encrypted using the temporary key."
    >
    > Les doesn't distinguish between WPA-PSK and WPA2 in this book--perhaps
    > that's because of when the book was printed. Do his statements only apply
    > to
    > WPA2, or did I miss something in my WPA-PSK setup?
    > --
    > So much to learn... So little time.
     
    Jack \(MVP-Networking\)., Oct 11, 2006
    #2
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  3. Hello, Jack! Thanks for responding.

    Since the the setup is the same for both, yet I was never prompted for user
    name and password info, do you know what Les was referring to in his book?
    If any form of WPA (WPA-PSK or WPA2) uses user names and passwords as Les
    described, where/how does WPA get them? Or... was there a change in how WPA
    is actually implemented now versus how they thought it would be implemented
    at the time Les wrote his book?
    --
    So much to learn... So little time.


    "Jack (MVP-Networking)." wrote:

    > Hi
    > There is no differences between WPA2 or WPA setup. You can use WPA2 provided
    > that both the source (Wireless Rouer/Access Point) are supporting WPA2, and
    > your Windows was upgraded to SP2.
    > Jack (MVP-Networking).
    >
    > "Roughneck" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > >I set up our first home network about 2 weeks ago and selected WPA-PSK
    > > security/encryption. As I recall, all I had to do was enter an encryption
    > > key on each PC--I was never prompted for username or password info. But
    > > in
    > > looking through a book printed in 2004, titled "Guide to Home Networking"
    > > (Les Freed at PC Magazine), Les says:
    > >
    > > "WPA is similar to WEP, but WPA combines encryption with user
    > > authentication... Instead of using a shared encryption key, WPA first
    > > requires users to identify themselves with a user name and password. If
    > > the
    > > users passes the authentication test, the AP sends the user a unique key
    > > that
    > > is valid for a limited period of time. The data connection between the
    > > user's PC and the AP is encrypted using the temporary key."
    > >
    > > Les doesn't distinguish between WPA-PSK and WPA2 in this book--perhaps
    > > that's because of when the book was printed. Do his statements only apply
    > > to
    > > WPA2, or did I miss something in my WPA-PSK setup?
    > > --
    > > So much to learn... So little time.

    >
    >
    >
     
    =?Utf-8?B?Um91Z2huZWNr?=, Oct 11, 2006
    #3
  4. Hi
    Regular user that is not logged to a special secure server (RADIUS) does not
    need id/password etc.
    You configure the WPA/WPA2 key between the source (Wireless Router) and the
    client (Wireless computer) and the connection uses the key to encrypted the
    stream.
    Jack (MVP-Networking).

    "Roughneck" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hello, Jack! Thanks for responding.
    >
    > Since the the setup is the same for both, yet I was never prompted for
    > user
    > name and password info, do you know what Les was referring to in his book?
    > If any form of WPA (WPA-PSK or WPA2) uses user names and passwords as Les
    > described, where/how does WPA get them? Or... was there a change in how
    > WPA
    > is actually implemented now versus how they thought it would be
    > implemented
    > at the time Les wrote his book?
    > --
    > So much to learn... So little time.
    >
    >
    > "Jack (MVP-Networking)." wrote:
    >
    >> Hi
    >> There is no differences between WPA2 or WPA setup. You can use WPA2
    >> provided
    >> that both the source (Wireless Rouer/Access Point) are supporting WPA2,
    >> and
    >> your Windows was upgraded to SP2.
    >> Jack (MVP-Networking).
    >>
    >> "Roughneck" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >> >I set up our first home network about 2 weeks ago and selected WPA-PSK
    >> > security/encryption. As I recall, all I had to do was enter an
    >> > encryption
    >> > key on each PC--I was never prompted for username or password info.
    >> > But
    >> > in
    >> > looking through a book printed in 2004, titled "Guide to Home
    >> > Networking"
    >> > (Les Freed at PC Magazine), Les says:
    >> >
    >> > "WPA is similar to WEP, but WPA combines encryption with user
    >> > authentication... Instead of using a shared encryption key, WPA first
    >> > requires users to identify themselves with a user name and password.
    >> > If
    >> > the
    >> > users passes the authentication test, the AP sends the user a unique
    >> > key
    >> > that
    >> > is valid for a limited period of time. The data connection between the
    >> > user's PC and the AP is encrypted using the temporary key."
    >> >
    >> > Les doesn't distinguish between WPA-PSK and WPA2 in this book--perhaps
    >> > that's because of when the book was printed. Do his statements only
    >> > apply
    >> > to
    >> > WPA2, or did I miss something in my WPA-PSK setup?
    >> > --
    >> > So much to learn... So little time.

    >>
    >>
    >>
     
    Jack \(MVP-Networking\)., Oct 11, 2006
    #4
  5. Thanks again, Jack.

    I wasn't at all familiar with RADIUS, so I did a little checking and assume
    you're referring to "Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service". Am I
    tracking with you on that? If so, based on what I read about RADIUS, one of
    its main features is the ability to require a valid user name and password.
    In terms of networking, I got the impression that ISPs are major users of
    RADIUS, using it to verify that all requests for internet access through
    their system are actually coming from authorized customers But if that's
    what it's about, I don't understand at all why Les used it to make a
    distinction between WEP and WPA in regard to home networking. i.e. His book
    is about setting up a home network but I don't see how or why that would be
    noteworthy if my WPA setup has no provision to setup and require valid user
    names and passwords. My ISP will require a user name and password from me
    when I request an IP address, regardless of what type of encryption I'm using
    or if I'm using any encryption at all. But I don't understand why he made a
    point of that when using WPA on a home network if there's no place to enter
    approved user name and password combinations.

    Oh, well--I guess my signature provides a pretty good idea about where I'm
    at with all this stuff. :)
    --
    So much to learn... So little time.


    "Jack (MVP-Networking)." wrote:

    > Hi
    > Regular user that is not logged to a special secure server (RADIUS) does not
    > need id/password etc.
    > You configure the WPA/WPA2 key between the source (Wireless Router) and the
    > client (Wireless computer) and the connection uses the key to encrypted the
    > stream.
    > Jack (MVP-Networking).
    >
    > "Roughneck" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Hello, Jack! Thanks for responding.
    > >
    > > Since the the setup is the same for both, yet I was never prompted for
    > > user
    > > name and password info, do you know what Les was referring to in his book?
    > > If any form of WPA (WPA-PSK or WPA2) uses user names and passwords as Les
    > > described, where/how does WPA get them? Or... was there a change in how
    > > WPA
    > > is actually implemented now versus how they thought it would be
    > > implemented
    > > at the time Les wrote his book?
    > > --
    > > So much to learn... So little time.
    > >
    > >
    > > "Jack (MVP-Networking)." wrote:
    > >
    > >> Hi
    > >> There is no differences between WPA2 or WPA setup. You can use WPA2
    > >> provided
    > >> that both the source (Wireless Rouer/Access Point) are supporting WPA2,
    > >> and
    > >> your Windows was upgraded to SP2.
    > >> Jack (MVP-Networking).
    > >>
    > >> "Roughneck" <> wrote in message
    > >> news:...
    > >> >I set up our first home network about 2 weeks ago and selected WPA-PSK
    > >> > security/encryption. As I recall, all I had to do was enter an
    > >> > encryption
    > >> > key on each PC--I was never prompted for username or password info.
    > >> > But
    > >> > in
    > >> > looking through a book printed in 2004, titled "Guide to Home
    > >> > Networking"
    > >> > (Les Freed at PC Magazine), Les says:
    > >> >
    > >> > "WPA is similar to WEP, but WPA combines encryption with user
    > >> > authentication... Instead of using a shared encryption key, WPA first
    > >> > requires users to identify themselves with a user name and password.
    > >> > If
    > >> > the
    > >> > users passes the authentication test, the AP sends the user a unique
    > >> > key
    > >> > that
    > >> > is valid for a limited period of time. The data connection between the
    > >> > user's PC and the AP is encrypted using the temporary key."
    > >> >
    > >> > Les doesn't distinguish between WPA-PSK and WPA2 in this book--perhaps
    > >> > that's because of when the book was printed. Do his statements only
    > >> > apply
    > >> > to
    > >> > WPA2, or did I miss something in my WPA-PSK setup?
    > >> > --
    > >> > So much to learn... So little time.
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>

    >
    >
    >
     
    =?Utf-8?B?Um91Z2huZWNr?=, Oct 12, 2006
    #5
  6. After re-reading Jack's last reply and doing a little more research, I think
    I understand why I don't have the user name and password options in my setup
    that Les said was a part of WPA.

    It's my impression that some network hardware may offer both an enterprise
    level and a home level of WPA. The enterprise level (referred to simply as
    WPA) offers user name and password authentication, while the home level
    (referred to as WPA-PSK) does not. But once you get past that difference,
    both levels (enterprise and home) work exactly the same.

    My network hardware only offers WPA-PSK, not straight WPA--therefore user
    name and password authentication is not a setup option for me.

    Am I starting to get the picture ?????

    I get the drift though, that once past the user name and password
    authentication offered by WPA
    --
    So much to learn... So little time.


    "Roughneck" wrote:

    > Thanks again, Jack.
    >
    > I wasn't at all familiar with RADIUS, so I did a little checking and assume
    > you're referring to "Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service". Am I
    > tracking with you on that? If so, based on what I read about RADIUS, one of
    > its main features is the ability to require a valid user name and password.
    > In terms of networking, I got the impression that ISPs are major users of
    > RADIUS, using it to verify that all requests for internet access through
    > their system are actually coming from authorized customers But if that's
    > what it's about, I don't understand at all why Les used it to make a
    > distinction between WEP and WPA in regard to home networking. i.e. His book
    > is about setting up a home network but I don't see how or why that would be
    > noteworthy if my WPA setup has no provision to setup and require valid user
    > names and passwords. My ISP will require a user name and password from me
    > when I request an IP address, regardless of what type of encryption I'm using
    > or if I'm using any encryption at all. But I don't understand why he made a
    > point of that when using WPA on a home network if there's no place to enter
    > approved user name and password combinations.
    >
    > Oh, well--I guess my signature provides a pretty good idea about where I'm
    > at with all this stuff. :)
    > --
    > So much to learn... So little time.
    >
    >
    > "Jack (MVP-Networking)." wrote:
    >
    > > Hi
    > > Regular user that is not logged to a special secure server (RADIUS) does not
    > > need id/password etc.
    > > You configure the WPA/WPA2 key between the source (Wireless Router) and the
    > > client (Wireless computer) and the connection uses the key to encrypted the
    > > stream.
    > > Jack (MVP-Networking).
    > >
    > > "Roughneck" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > > > Hello, Jack! Thanks for responding.
    > > >
    > > > Since the the setup is the same for both, yet I was never prompted for
    > > > user
    > > > name and password info, do you know what Les was referring to in his book?
    > > > If any form of WPA (WPA-PSK or WPA2) uses user names and passwords as Les
    > > > described, where/how does WPA get them? Or... was there a change in how
    > > > WPA
    > > > is actually implemented now versus how they thought it would be
    > > > implemented
    > > > at the time Les wrote his book?
    > > > --
    > > > So much to learn... So little time.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > "Jack (MVP-Networking)." wrote:
    > > >
    > > >> Hi
    > > >> There is no differences between WPA2 or WPA setup. You can use WPA2
    > > >> provided
    > > >> that both the source (Wireless Rouer/Access Point) are supporting WPA2,
    > > >> and
    > > >> your Windows was upgraded to SP2.
    > > >> Jack (MVP-Networking).
    > > >>
    > > >> "Roughneck" <> wrote in message
    > > >> news:...
    > > >> >I set up our first home network about 2 weeks ago and selected WPA-PSK
    > > >> > security/encryption. As I recall, all I had to do was enter an
    > > >> > encryption
    > > >> > key on each PC--I was never prompted for username or password info.
    > > >> > But
    > > >> > in
    > > >> > looking through a book printed in 2004, titled "Guide to Home
    > > >> > Networking"
    > > >> > (Les Freed at PC Magazine), Les says:
    > > >> >
    > > >> > "WPA is similar to WEP, but WPA combines encryption with user
    > > >> > authentication... Instead of using a shared encryption key, WPA first
    > > >> > requires users to identify themselves with a user name and password.
    > > >> > If
    > > >> > the
    > > >> > users passes the authentication test, the AP sends the user a unique
    > > >> > key
    > > >> > that
    > > >> > is valid for a limited period of time. The data connection between the
    > > >> > user's PC and the AP is encrypted using the temporary key."
    > > >> >
    > > >> > Les doesn't distinguish between WPA-PSK and WPA2 in this book--perhaps
    > > >> > that's because of when the book was printed. Do his statements only
    > > >> > apply
    > > >> > to
    > > >> > WPA2, or did I miss something in my WPA-PSK setup?
    > > >> > --
    > > >> > So much to learn... So little time.
    > > >>
    > > >>
    > > >>

    > >
    > >
    > >
     
    =?Utf-8?B?Um91Z2huZWNr?=, Oct 12, 2006
    #6
  7. "Roughneck" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > After re-reading Jack's last reply and doing a little more research, I
    > think
    > I understand why I don't have the user name and password options in my
    > setup
    > that Les said was a part of WPA.
    >
    > It's my impression that some network hardware may offer both an enterprise
    > level and a home level of WPA. The enterprise level (referred to simply
    > as
    > WPA) offers user name and password authentication, while the home level
    > (referred to as WPA-PSK) does not. But once you get past that difference,
    > both levels (enterprise and home) work exactly the same.
    >
    > My network hardware only offers WPA-PSK, not straight WPA--therefore user
    > name and password authentication is not a setup option for me.
    >
    > Am I starting to get the picture ?????
    >
    > I get the drift though, that once past the user name and password
    > authentication offered by WPA
    > --
    > So much to learn... So little time.


    Yes, WPA/WPA2 - Authentication is handled by service using credentials,
    result of the authentication is used to create encryption keys;
    WPA-PSK/WPA2-PSK a pre shared key is used to authenticate and then that key
    is used to create the encryption keys.

    Phil
     
    Philip Doragh, Oct 12, 2006
    #7
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