USB stick rescue (no MBR no Partition) "Code 10"

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by NotSure, Feb 27, 2010.

  1. NotSure

    NotSure Guest

    Hi guys! Some #$%^& computer ruined my 2gig thumbdrive.

    executive summary:
    - Linux *fdisk* does not see the USBstick (udev does)
    - (every) Windows says: This device cannot start (Code 10)

    Details here http://y23.com/wiki/pmwiki.php/Main/RecoverySoftware
    (output of dmesg, udevinfo, lsusb)

    Knoppix, Winxp win98, HirenBootCD... a few old laptops.. available..

    I'd be stoked if someone helped to recover my data, I'll gladly send
    you a 2010 (or 2011) Astronomical Pocket Diary http://y23.com/apd or a
    lifetime subscription to the online Astro Diary http://y23.com/apdoe
    ...

    Always remember: Insomnia is nothing to loose sleep about!
    NotSure, Feb 27, 2010
    #1
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  2. NotSure

    Enkidu Guest

    NotSure wrote:
    > Hi guys! Some #$%^& computer ruined my 2gig thumbdrive.
    >
    > executive summary:
    > - Linux *fdisk* does not see the USBstick (udev does)
    > - (every) Windows says: This device cannot start (Code 10)
    >
    > Details here http://y23.com/wiki/pmwiki.php/Main/RecoverySoftware
    > (output of dmesg, udevinfo, lsusb)
    >
    > Knoppix, Winxp win98, HirenBootCD... a few old laptops.. available..
    >
    > I'd be stoked if someone helped to recover my data, I'll gladly send
    > you a 2010 (or 2011) Astronomical Pocket Diary http://y23.com/apd or a
    > lifetime subscription to the online Astro Diary http://y23.com/apdoe
    >

    If a USB stick goes bad, in my experience there's no way to get it back.
    And I wouldn't blame the computer - USB sticks can fail all by themselves.

    Cheers,

    Cliff

    --

    The ends justifies the means - Niccolò di Bernardo dei Machiavelli.

    The end excuses any evil - Sophocles
    Enkidu, Feb 27, 2010
    #2
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  3. In message <b08bc997-
    >, NotSure wrote:

    > - Linux *fdisk* does not see the USBstick (udev does)


    You shouldn’t need to mess around with udev rules. The default rules include
    automatic creation of device entries for USB storage devices.

    Looking at the man page for fdisk(8), it says that “fdisk -l†with no
    devices specified will list partitions from /proc/partitions. I believe this
    lists partitions on all attached devices on which the kernel can recognize a
    partition table.

    So the fact that your drive is not showing up here must mean the partition
    table is munged.

    If you can make an intelligent guess as to what the partition layout should
    be, you can recreate that with fdisk or sfdisk, and get your data back.
    Would it be right to assume that there should be a single partition covering
    the entire drive (apart from the partition table, of course)?
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Feb 27, 2010
    #3
  4. NotSure

    Richard Guest

    NotSure wrote:
    > Hi guys! Some #$%^& computer ruined my 2gig thumbdrive.
    >
    > executive summary:
    > - Linux *fdisk* does not see the USBstick (udev does)
    > - (every) Windows says: This device cannot start (Code 10)
    >
    > Details here http://y23.com/wiki/pmwiki.php/Main/RecoverySoftware
    > (output of dmesg, udevinfo, lsusb)
    >
    > Knoppix, Winxp win98, HirenBootCD... a few old laptops.. available..
    >
    > I'd be stoked if someone helped to recover my data, I'll gladly send
    > you a 2010 (or 2011) Astronomical Pocket Diary http://y23.com/apd or a
    > lifetime subscription to the online Astro Diary http://y23.com/apdoe
    > ..
    >
    > Always remember: Insomnia is nothing to loose sleep about!


    I had one die and had to get someone to move the flash chip to an
    identical drive to get the data off it.

    Newer smaller ones are all integrated so you dont even have that option.
    Richard, Feb 27, 2010
    #4
  5. NotSure

    NotSure Guest

    Thank you Lawrence!!!

    > You shouldn’t need to mess around with udev rules. The default rules include
    > automatic creation of device entries for USB storage devices.


    aha!


    > Looking at the man page for fdisk(8), it says that “fdisk -l” with no
    > devices specified will list partitions from /proc/partitions. I believe this
    > lists partitions on all attached devices on which the kernel can recognize a
    > partition table.


    ok, makes perfect sense.

    > So the fact that your drive is not showing up here must mean the partition
    > table is munged.


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mung
    "the act of making several incremental changes to an item that combine
    to destroy it"
    LOL ... yes, that would be right.

    > If you can make an intelligent guess as to what the partition layout should
    > be, you can recreate that with fdisk or sfdisk, and get your data back.


    Yet my stick is no longer a device. My idea was to create a device-
    node to be able to talk to it.

    > Would it be right to assume that there should be a single partition covering
    > the entire drive (apart from the partition table, of course)?


    Yes, it is a single partition 2gig. Let me describe my wonderful usb
    flash drive in need of resurrection:

    Last I was running a "Mini XP" windows,
    to backup data from a 2cpu 2.8Ghz machine that always freezes..
    I later found out that it may not freeze totally it just looses screen
    and (usb-)keyboard,
    but I am nit sure at all about this. In any case, while running a
    mini-WinXP from
    the stick ... it must have happened. -- No booting anymore from that
    stick.
    Later, at home, I found the stick was unusable.

    I must have followed these (or similar) instructions to set it up:
    http://ilearncomp.blogspot.com/2009/07/boot-from-usb-flash-drive.html

    But how can I use cfdisk if no device is usable?

    I really would like to copy the stick bit-by-bit to harddrive and then
    try to mount the image,
    if it had appeared as /dev/sda I could have done that with dd if=/
    dev/sda of=file.xyz
    right?
    NotSure, Feb 27, 2010
    #5
  6. NotSure

    NotSure Guest

    http://www.google.co.nz/search?q=dead usb drive
    there is a suggestion to use a low-level QUICK format to revive the
    dead flash drive.

    My usb-pendrive is working fine. It's little blue light does exactly
    what it did always,
    I am sure there is just a BAD BYTE in the system area. But how to
    access it?


    ===== original post ====

    executive summary:
    - Linux *fdisk* does not see the USBstick (udev does)
    - (every) Windows says: This device cannot start (Code 10)

    Details here http://y23.com/wiki/pmwiki.php/Main/RecoverySoftware
    (output of dmesg, udevinfo, lsusb)

    Knoppix, Winxp win98, HirenBootCD... a few old laptops.. available..

    I'd be stoked if someone helped to recover my data, I'll gladly send
    you a 2010 (or 2011) Astronomical Pocket Diary http://y23.com/apd or a
    lifetime subscription to the online Astro Diary http://y23.com/apdoe
    ...
    NotSure, Feb 27, 2010
    #6
  7. In message <fa3a63e6-0ea9-4885-af94-
    >, NotSure wrote:

    > In message <hmachh$6bc$>, Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >>
    >> If you can make an intelligent guess as to what the partition layout
    >> should be, you can recreate that with fdisk or sfdisk, and get your data
    >> back.

    >
    > Yet my stick is no longer a device. My idea was to create a device-
    > node to be able to talk to it.


    There will be a device node. udev will have created one. Depending on how
    many drives your machine already has, it will probably have a name like
    /dev/sdb or /dev/sdc or ...

    To find out, try this command

    ls -l /sys/block | grep -vE 'loop|ram'

    That will list all the block devices your kernel knows about, excluding
    ramdisk and loopback devices. for each name nnn in turn, try listing the
    partition table for the device /dev/nnn, e.g.

    sfdisk -l /dev/sda
    sfdisk -l /dev/sdb

    and so on. If you get a meaningful partition listing, then that’s probably
    not your USB drive. :)
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Feb 27, 2010
    #7
  8. NotSure

    Lusotec Guest

    NotSure wrote:
    > Hi guys! Some #$%^& computer ruined my 2gig thumbdrive.
    >
    > executive summary:
    > - Linux *fdisk* does not see the USBstick (udev does)
    > - (every) Windows says: This device cannot start (Code 10)
    >
    > Details here http://y23.com/wiki/pmwiki.php/Main/RecoverySoftware
    > (output of dmesg, udevinfo, lsusb)
    >
    > Knoppix, Winxp win98, HirenBootCD... a few old laptops.. available..
    >
    > I'd be stoked if someone helped to recover my data, I'll gladly send
    > you a 2010 (or 2011) Astronomical Pocket Diary http://y23.com/apd or a
    > lifetime subscription to the online Astro Diary http://y23.com/apdoe


    Looking at dmesg output I don't see information on a sd? device being
    created for the USB drive.

    Check if a /dev/sdX is created when you connect the USB drive.

    If a /dev/sdX is created then use the command
    dd if=/dev/sdX of=/dev/null
    to check if the device can be read.

    If this works, use the command
    blkid /dev/sdX*
    to get information the partition's file systems.

    If a file system is detect then use the mount command to mount it.

    Example:
    mount -o ro /dev/sdX1 /mnt/tmp


    If the USB drive hardware is damaged then retrieving the data may be very
    expensive, if at all possible. If the damage is only on the data then you
    may be able to recover your data using some software for that purpose.

    Regards.
    Lusotec, Feb 27, 2010
    #8
  9. NotSure

    Enkidu Guest

    NotSure wrote:
    >
    > http://www.google.co.nz/search?q=dead usb drive there is a suggestion
    > to use a low-level QUICK format to revive the dead flash drive.
    >

    A low level format would wipe all your data, wouldn't it?
    >
    > My usb-pendrive is working fine. It's little blue light does exactly
    > what it did always, I am sure there is just a BAD BYTE in the system
    > area. But how to access it?
    >

    If it were a bad byte in the system area you would usually see
    *something* (eg a zero-byte size filesystem). Since you can't see
    anything, even a device, the thing is probably beyond recovery.

    Cheers,

    Cliff

    --

    The ends justifies the means - Niccolò di Bernardo dei Machiavelli.

    The end excuses any evil - Sophocles
    Enkidu, Feb 27, 2010
    #9
  10. NotSure

    Mark Hobley Guest

    NotSure <> wrote:

    > I really would like to copy the stick bit-by-bit to harddrive and then
    > try to mount the image,
    > if it had appeared as /dev/sda I could have done that with dd if=/
    > dev/sda of=file.xyz
    > right?


    You tend to mount partitions, not entire drives. So unless the drive had been
    formatted without a partition table, this would not have worked.

    It would have been better to use:

    dd if=/dev/sda1 of=file.xyz

    I suspect you also did something that wrote to /dev/sda, wiping out the
    partition table, rendering the drive as not recognizable from within
    Microsoft Windows.

    You can use drives without a partition table, but it is not a good idea if
    they are intented to be moved across systems, because some systems may see
    the drive as unusable or empty.

    Mark.

    --
    Mark Hobley
    Linux User: #370818 http://markhobley.yi.org/
    Mark Hobley, Feb 27, 2010
    #10
  11. NotSure

    NotSure Guest

    ============================

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY:

    Flash-USB-memory-stick (2gig) DEAD, advice on recovery needed.
    - udev, lsusb *do* recognise the drive,
    - but *no device* /dev/sdxx is created

    Question: partition-table? Mbr?

    output of dmesg, udevinfo, lsusb is here:
    http://y23.com/wiki/pmwiki.php/Main/RecoverySoftware

    PRIZE! A free http://y23.com/apd ASTRO-POCKET-DIARY for 2011!!

    =============================

    Hello everyone, and thank you for your responses ...

    Again, The the stick *does* appear in system responses,
    but there is NO DEVICE.

    My guess: the USB-mechanism receives a "yes it is a Storage-USB"
    but then it gets a wrong nonsense response...

    For Windows users:
    When I insert the usbstick I hear THREE DINGS (SOUNDS)
    - The three low dings is Windows XP's way of saying "this screwed up"
    - This device cannot start (Code 10)


    Hi Lusotec!

    > Check if a /dev/sdX is created when you connect the USB drive.


    No DEVICE CREATED.


    > If a file system is detect then use the mount command to mount it.


    What do you mean? Have you looked at
    the output of dmesg, udevinfo, lsusb???
    http://y23.com/wiki/pmwiki.php/Main/RecoverySoftware



    Hi Enkidu, Cliff!

    > Since you can't see
    > anything, even a device, the thing is probably beyond recovery.


    Thanks for being vague and depressing.

    "probably" - How probable?

    "even a device" ?? I *can* see the hardware.
    The boot-sector/partition-table is bad.
    DO YOU HAVE ANY INSPIRATION OF ANY TOOLS I CAN TRY????


    Hello Mark,

    > I suspect you also did something that wrote to /dev/sda,
    > wiping out the partition table, rendering the drive
    > as not recognizable from within Microsoft Windows.


    If there was only a bad partition-table, I would be able
    to ACCESS it, and erase the partition.

    > You can use drives without a partition table,
    > but it is not a good idea if they are intented to be moved
    > across systems, because some systems may see
    > the drive as unusable or empty.


    aha. So how do I access a this drive "without a partition table"
    i.e. RAW????

    Remember: I **DO NOT GET** a "DRIVE".
    It is like I have to LOW LEVEL REPAIR it.

    If anyone has a suggestion WHICH TOOL to try,
    make wild assumptions and crazy suggestions!!

    And remember:

    It is bad luck to be superstitious!!
    NotSure, Feb 28, 2010
    #11
  12. NotSure

    Sweetpea Guest

    On Sat, 27 Feb 2010 18:26:50 -0800, NotSure wrote:

    > If anyone has a suggestion WHICH TOOL to try, make wild assumptions and
    > crazy suggestions!!


    Is this data really that important to you? Where is your backup copy? Why don't you use that?


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
    Sweetpea, Feb 28, 2010
    #12
  13. NotSure

    Gordon Guest

    On 2010-02-27, Richard <> wrote:
    > NotSure wrote:
    >> Hi guys! Some #$%^& computer ruined my 2gig thumbdrive.
    >>
    >> executive summary:
    >> - Linux *fdisk* does not see the USBstick (udev does)
    >> - (every) Windows says: This device cannot start (Code 10)
    >>
    >> Details here http://y23.com/wiki/pmwiki.php/Main/RecoverySoftware
    >> (output of dmesg, udevinfo, lsusb)
    >>
    >> Knoppix, Winxp win98, HirenBootCD... a few old laptops.. available..
    >>
    >> I'd be stoked if someone helped to recover my data, I'll gladly send
    >> you a 2010 (or 2011) Astronomical Pocket Diary http://y23.com/apd or a
    >> lifetime subscription to the online Astro Diary http://y23.com/apdoe
    >> ..
    >>


    >
    > I had one die and had to get someone to move the flash chip to an
    > identical drive to get the data off it.
    >
    > Newer smaller ones are all integrated so you dont even have that option.


    History here. Backups, you know the things that worth SFA, until something
    happens and then they rise in value faster than a rocket.

    HD used to fail, oh dear they still do. Since they days of sailing ships
    people have been insuring things, ships and Lloyds of London resulted from
    it.

    Strange how easily it is to get a digital copy, and yet the saying remains.

    There are two typoes of computer users: those that have needed a backup and
    those that who will need to have a backup.

    How much risk do you wish to carry? Data is valuable protect it, yes?
    Gordon, Feb 28, 2010
    #13
  14. NotSure

    Mark Hobley Guest

    NotSure <> wrote:
    > Flash-USB-memory-stick (2gig) DEAD, advice on recovery needed.
    > - udev, lsusb *do* recognise the drive,
    > - but *no device* /dev/sdxx is created


    Reboot the machine and kill the automounter.

    Now plug the stick in.

    ls /dev/sd? (only one question mark, we are looking for the whole stick here)

    That will tell us what the stick is. These notes assume /dev/sda. But if you
    have been plugging the stick in and out, it may be something else

    Blank the penstick using the data dumper:

    dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sda

    Now use fdisk to create a partion table:

    fdisk /dev/sda

    n (to create a new partition)
    p (for a primary partition)

    create a partition of maximum size, and of type b (fat32).

    w (write the partition table to disk)
    q (quit fdisk)

    Now a partition should have appeared:

    ls /dev/sda1

    Now you need to format the partition.

    mkfs -t vfat /dev/sda1

    > If there was only a bad partition-table, I would be able
    > to ACCESS it, and erase the partition.


    You used the wrong device name, so there is no partition table. Your partition
    effectively starts where the partition table should have gone.

    > aha. So how do I access a this drive "without a partition table"


    Right. If you do not create a partition table, you will not be able to use
    the penstick on other machines. Do not do this!!!

    > Remember: I **DO NOT GET** a "DRIVE".


    You won't get a drive, until you create a formatted partition.
    Do as I say above!

    Mark.

    --
    Mark Hobley
    Linux User: #370818 http://markhobley.yi.org/
    Mark Hobley, Feb 28, 2010
    #14
  15. NotSure

    Enkidu Guest

    NotSure wrote:
    >
    > Hi Enkidu, Cliff!
    >
    >> Since you can't see
    >> anything, even a device, the thing is probably beyond recovery.

    >
    > Thanks for being vague and depressing.
    >

    I've only ever recovered a USB stick and that one showed as having 8kB
    rather than one GB, so there was something there. I've had devices that
    have behaved similar to the one you are having problems with, and I've
    never been able to recover them. There's an HP utility that helps in
    some cases.

    I think of USB sticks as big floppy disks. If a floppy disk goes bad,
    you might as well chuck it. Same with USB sticks. They are much more
    fragile than hard disks.
    >
    > "probably" - How probable?
    >

    Very probably.
    >
    > "even a device" ?? I *can* see the hardware.
    > The boot-sector/partition-table is bad.
    > DO YOU HAVE ANY INSPIRATION OF ANY TOOLS I CAN TRY????
    >

    You can see the hardware, but you can't see a device as in /dev/????

    Sorry you think that I am being depressing. I believe that I'm being
    realistic.

    Cheers,

    Cliff
    Enkidu, Feb 28, 2010
    #15
  16. NotSure

    NotSure Guest

    Sweetpea <> wrote:

    > Is this data really that important to you?
    > Where is your backup copy? Why don't you use that?


    Thanks for the suggestion. What *was* I thinking?

    Gordon <> wrote:

    > History here. Backups, you know the things that worth SFA,
    > until something happens and then they rise in value faster
    > than a rocket.


    indeed indeed.

    > Strange how easily it is to get a digital copy,
    > and yet the saying remains.
    > There are two typoes of computer users:
    > those that have needed a backup and
    > those that who will need to have a backup.
    > How much risk do you wish to carry?
    > Data is valuable protect it, yes?


    yes yes, You would make a good priest, Gordon.
    Preaching to the sinners...

    Its is actually a bit like christianity,
    we only start to believe in God on our death-bed.
    You have no idea how many staunch atheists
    pray and pray when the final moment has arrived.

    My USB stick, however, I believe to be comatose ;-)



    Golden California Girls <> wrote:

    > Finally you set a followup to header!!!


    sorrrrry, yes. I should have done that immediately.

    > May I suggest a bath in liquid nitrogen
    > while you try and access.
    > Very likely the stick itself has failed and
    > getting it cold may allow it to have its data read out.


    Yey! A good suggestion for a change. I'll keep that in mind
    muchas gracias!!!

    > If this fails I suggest a sledgehammer
    > to make sure no CIA type with
    > an electron microscope can read the data.


    Hehe, the NSA and CIA will want the data!
    I kept pictures of bearded men and high buildings
    on it. They can construct another terror-case
    and "keep America safe" (in constant fear)
    while getting huuuge budgets to develop even
    more clandestine exotic weaponry, in order to
    commit the mext 9/11 terror snuff-job.
    It sure is necessary soon, The world wants it's
    money back, see
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_current_account_balance

    > If you don't have data on it,
    > quit wasting your time, they aren't that expensive.


    Its the data I need...

    > Or course if your intent is to spam
    > for some pocket diary ...


    HEY! It's not "some" Pocket Diary!
    Its can tell you the future! Ah, but
    US empire doesn't have one, never mind then.


    MARK HOBLEY

    Please say after me:

    "When the USB Stick is plugged in, no
    /dev/sdx? -- node is created"

    THANK YOU very much for the typing-grease
    and the PERFECT instructions for any linux
    newbie to format a USB stick from the shell.

    > You used the wrong device name,


    there is *NO* device-node.

    > so there is no partition table.
    > Your partition effectively starts where
    > the partition table should have gone.


    Nice theory.

    > You won't get a drive, until you create
    > a formatted partition.Do as I say above!


    there is no /dev/sda1 no /dev/sda2 no /dev/sda3
    no /dev/sdb1 no /dev/sdb2 no /dev/sdb3
    no /dev/sdc1 no /dev/sdc1
    no /dev- NOTHING. only /dev/hda1 (which is my HDD)


    Enkidu <> wrote:

    >. You can see the hardware, but you can't
    > see a device as in /dev/????


    yep. In all 3 computers I have available.

    again: lsusb and udevinfo report all details,
    manufacturer, everything.
    but linux does not assigne a /dev/sdxx node.

    - LED blinks normal when inserted
    - gives a windows code 10 error (three ding-sounds)
    - linux udevinfo, lsusb report flashDrive present, but no /dev/sdxx
    node is made

    Flash-memory was corrupted?

    Is there any programme that can access the flash-memory-chip
    differently though USB?
    Can the chip be talked-to in a low-level access via USBus AT ALL??
    NotSure, Feb 28, 2010
    #16
  17. NotSure

    Lusotec Guest

    NotSure wrote:
    > ============================
    >
    > EXECUTIVE SUMMARY:
    >
    > Flash-USB-memory-stick (2gig) DEAD, advice on recovery needed.
    > - udev, lsusb *do* recognise the drive,
    > - but *no device* /dev/sdxx is created
    >> Question: partition-table? Mbr?

    >
    > output of dmesg, udevinfo, lsusb is here:
    > http://y23.com/wiki/pmwiki.php/Main/RecoverySoftware
    >
    > PRIZE! A free http://y23.com/apd ASTRO-POCKET-DIARY for 2011!!
    >
    > =============================
    >
    > Hello everyone, and thank you for your responses ...
    >
    > Again, The the stick *does* appear in system responses,
    > but there is NO DEVICE.
    >
    > My guess: the USB-mechanism receives a "yes it is a Storage-USB"
    > but then it gets a wrong nonsense response...
    >
    > For Windows users:
    > When I insert the usbstick I hear THREE DINGS (SOUNDS)
    > - The three low dings is Windows XP's way of saying "this screwed up"
    > - This device cannot start (Code 10)
    >
    >
    > Hi Lusotec!
    >
    >> Check if a /dev/sdX is created when you connect the USB drive.

    >
    > No DEVICE CREATED.


    Since no device is created, my best guess is that the problem is in the USB
    drive hardware. Note that the creation of the device does not depend on the
    state of the MBR or partition table.

    >> If a file system is detect then use the mount command to mount it.

    >
    > What do you mean? Have you looked at
    > the output of dmesg, udevinfo, lsusb???
    > http://y23.com/wiki/pmwiki.php/Main/RecoverySoftware


    Without a /dev/sd* there is no way to access the data on the device, much
    less mount it.

    > Hi Enkidu, Cliff!
    >
    >> Since you can't see
    >> anything, even a device, the thing is probably beyond recovery.

    >
    > Thanks for being vague and depressing.
    >
    > "probably" - How probable?
    >
    > "even a device" ?? I *can* see the hardware.


    The USB handshaking is working and thus the system sees the USB device but
    when trying to access it as a storage device something does not work.

    > The boot-sector/partition-table is bad.
    > DO YOU HAVE ANY INSPIRATION OF ANY TOOLS I CAN TRY????


    Even if the boot sector and the partition table where complete trash that
    would not be a problem to access it as a RAW block device. The /dev/sdX file
    device should still be created and accessible.

    > Hello Mark,
    >
    >> I suspect you also did something that wrote to /dev/sda,
    >> wiping out the partition table, rendering the drive
    >> as not recognizable from within Microsoft Windows.

    >
    > If there was only a bad partition-table, I would be able
    > to ACCESS it, and erase the partition.


    If a bad partition table was the problem then it would be easy to recover
    the data by accessing the /dev/sdX device. The fact that no /dev/sdX device
    is created indicated that some other more fundamental problem is occurring.

    >> You can use drives without a partition table,
    >> but it is not a good idea if they are intented to be moved
    >> across systems, because some systems may see
    >> the drive as unusable or empty.

    >
    > aha. So how do I access a this drive "without a partition table"
    > i.e. RAW????


    Use the /dev/sdX devices and not the /dev/sdX[1-9] ones.

    > Remember: I **DO NOT GET** a "DRIVE".
    > It is like I have to LOW LEVEL REPAIR it.
    >
    > If anyone has a suggestion WHICH TOOL to try,
    > make wild assumptions and crazy suggestions!!


    One wild recommendation coming up.

    1) get one USB sniffer (http://www.linux-usb.org/tools.html);
    2) get a working USB drive as similar as possible to the one that want to
    access. Another exactly equal would be ideal;
    3) Disconnect any auto mounter to minimize the USB traffic;
    4) activate the USB sniffer;
    5) connect the working USB drive;
    6) disconnect the working USB drive;
    7) save the working USB traffic;
    8) connect the non working USB drive;
    9) disconnect the non working USB drive;
    10) save the non working USB traffic;
    11) Compare the working USB traffic with the non USB traffic.

    If there is a significant difference in USB traffic between the devices then
    a hardware problem is the most likely cause.

    If it is a hardware problem but the flash memory is intact and is separate
    from the controller chip then you (or someone with electronics experience)
    may be able to swap the flash memories and access the data that way.

    > And remember:
    >
    > It is bad luck to be superstitious!!


    Only if you say it three times and don't knock on wood!

    Regards.
    Lusotec, Feb 28, 2010
    #17
  18. NotSure

    NotSure Guest

    Thank you, thank you very much.

    > usbtools


    good info!
    ... something to monkey around with on long winter evenings.

    One would think that some programmer has already written an analysis-
    programme
    that has all the answers about what's happening on the US-bus.

    I tried the HP_Drive_Key_Boot_Utility---cp006049.exe (50mB) but it too
    is blind to my usb-memory-stick, can't see it.

    DOS-USB drivers don't even start.. when the stick is inserted.

    >> Can the chip be talked-to in a low-level access via USBus AT ALL??


    your answer is a "probably not" ... I take it...

    many thanks again.. I'll keep this thread updated as I find out new
    things.

    Am I ambivalent? Well, yes and no.

    ;-)
    NotSure, Mar 1, 2010
    #18
  19. NotSure

    Richard Guest

    Gordon wrote:

    > Strange how easily it is to get a digital copy, and yet the saying remains.
    >
    > There are two typoes of computer users: those that have needed a backup and
    > those that who will need to have a backup.
    >
    > How much risk do you wish to carry? Data is valuable protect it, yes?


    Yes, but when it is something that is logging to the USB device and it
    fails, there isnt a backup at that stage.

    For everything else there is online backups etc.
    Richard, Mar 1, 2010
    #19
  20. NotSure

    Dave Doe Guest

    In article <b08bc997-be89-4f26-97bc-4d39c35f9cb5
    @z1g2000prc.googlegroups.com>, says...
    >
    > Hi guys! Some #$%^& computer ruined my 2gig thumbdrive.
    >
    > executive summary:
    > - Linux *fdisk* does not see the USBstick (udev does)
    > - (every) Windows says: This device cannot start (Code 10)
    >
    > Details here http://y23.com/wiki/pmwiki.php/Main/RecoverySoftware
    > (output of dmesg, udevinfo, lsusb)
    >
    > Knoppix, Winxp win98, HirenBootCD... a few old laptops.. available..
    >
    > I'd be stoked if someone helped to recover my data, I'll gladly send
    > you a 2010 (or 2011) Astronomical Pocket Diary http://y23.com/apd or a
    > lifetime subscription to the online Astro Diary http://y23.com/apdoe
    > ..
    >
    > Always remember: Insomnia is nothing to loose sleep about!


    Try test disk data recovery - dunno if it'll correctly see removable
    drives...

    http://www.cgsecurity.org/

    I've used it for HDD data recovery and it works well.

    --
    Duncan.
    Dave Doe, Mar 3, 2010
    #20
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