USB Phone with Yahoo messenger?

Discussion in 'UK VOIP' started by Gyuri, Jul 13, 2006.

  1. Gyuri

    Gyuri Guest

    Hi. I got this USB Adaptor

    http://www.morgancomputers.co.uk/images/products/Skype_USB_Telbox.jpg

    And I was wondering if there's was a way to make it work with Yahoo
    messenger because they have better rates than Skype. I want to make
    international calls with Yahoo voice messenger by using my home phone
    connected to this adapter but unfortunately I don't know how to make it
    work with Yahoo and this is if it really works with yahoo. I would
    really appreaciate if someone could help me.

    Thank you.
    Gyuri, Jul 13, 2006
    #1
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  2. Gyuri

    Brian A Guest

    On 13 Jul 2006 10:35:28 -0700, "Gyuri" <>
    wrote:

    >Hi. I got this USB Adaptor
    >
    >http://www.morgancomputers.co.uk/images/products/Skype_USB_Telbox.jpg
    >
    >And I was wondering if there's was a way to make it work with Yahoo
    >messenger because they have better rates than Skype. I want to make
    >international calls with Yahoo voice messenger by using my home phone
    >connected to this adapter but unfortunately I don't know how to make it
    >work with Yahoo and this is if it really works with yahoo. I would
    >really appreaciate if someone could help me.
    >
    >Thank you.

    Why waste money on a USB box when you can get the real thing that will
    connect to all your standard home phones.
    Take a look at what Voip is really about on www.voip-info.org
    Start with ' Getting Started' part way down the page.
    Then come back here and ask some more. My advice: Forget about toytown
    Skype and spend your money on the real thing!
    Remove 'no_spam_' from email address.
    Brian A, Jul 13, 2006
    #2
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  3. Gyuri

    Brian Guest

    On 2006-07-13, Brian A <> wrote:

    > On 13 Jul 2006 10:35:28 -0700, "Gyuri" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>Hi. I got this USB Adaptor
    >>
    >>http://www.morgancomputers.co.uk/images/products/Skype_USB_Telbox.jpg
    >>
    >>And I was wondering if there's was a way to make it work with Yahoo
    >>messenger because they have better rates than Skype. I want to make
    >>international calls with Yahoo voice messenger by using my home phone
    >>connected to this adapter but unfortunately I don't know how to make it
    >>work with Yahoo and this is if it really works with yahoo. I would
    >>really appreaciate if someone could help me.
    >>
    >>Thank you.

    >
    > Why waste money on a USB box when you can get the real thing that will
    > connect to all your standard home phones.


    The financial advice is a little late - he has already bought the
    adaptor and is hoping to make the most of his investment.

    > Take a look at what Voip is really about on www.voip-info.org Start
    > with ' Getting Started' part way down the page. Then come back here
    > and ask some more.


    Will he be tested on what he has read to ascertain how true a convert he
    has become?

    > My advice: Forget about toytown
    > Skype and spend your money on the real thing!


    I got the impression Yahoo Messenger was the subject of the question.

    Brian.
    Brian, Jul 14, 2006
    #3
  4. Gyuri

    Brian Guest

    On 2006-07-13, Gyuri <> wrote:
    >
    > Hi. I got this USB Adaptor
    >
    > http://www.morgancomputers.co.uk/images/products/Skype_USB_Telbox.jpg
    >
    > And I was wondering if there's was a way to make it work with Yahoo
    > messenger because they have better rates than Skype. I want to make
    > international calls with Yahoo voice messenger by using my home phone
    > connected to this adapter but unfortunately I don't know how to make it
    > work with Yahoo and this is if it really works with yahoo. I would
    > really appreaciate if someone could help me.


    That adaptor seems available under different names such as Telbox and
    B2K. www.mplat.com has a forum devoted to its support. A search on
    uk.yahoo.com gives one dispiriting response indicating it does not work
    with Yahoo.

    Brian.
    Brian, Jul 14, 2006
    #4
  5. Gyuri

    JC Guest

    On 13 Jul 2006 10:35:28 -0700, "Gyuri" <>
    wrote:

    >Hi. I got this USB Adaptor
    >
    >http://www.morgancomputers.co.uk/images/products/Skype_USB_Telbox.jpg
    >
    >And I was wondering if there's was a way to make it work with Yahoo
    >messenger because they have better rates than Skype. I want to make
    >international calls with Yahoo voice messenger by using my home phone
    >connected to this adapter but unfortunately I don't know how to make it
    >work with Yahoo and this is if it really works with yahoo. I would
    >really appreaciate if someone could help me.


    Looks like a Yealink Telebox USB-B2K from that picture, in which case,
    software and drivers for lots of different systems can be downloaded
    here:

    http://www.yealink.com/en/otherdown.asp

    Never used Yahoo messenger in anger, however it should appear as a USB
    audio device, so at the very least the audio should work.

    Rgds
    Jonathan

    --
    Free UK based SIP accounts at www.kcip.com.
    JC, Jul 14, 2006
    #5
  6. Gyuri

    RH Guest


    >> Why waste money on a USB box when you can get the real thing that will
    >> connect to all your standard home phones.

    >
    > The financial advice is a little late - he has already bought the
    > adaptor and is hoping to make the most of his investment.
    >
    >> Take a look at what Voip is really about on www.voip-info.org Start
    >> with ' Getting Started' part way down the page. Then come back here
    >> and ask some more.

    >
    > Will he be tested on what he has read to ascertain how true a convert he
    > has become?
    >
    >> My advice: Forget about toytown
    >> Skype and spend your money on the real thing!

    >
    > I got the impression Yahoo Messenger was the subject of the question.



    Its all well and good you singing the praises of ATA hardphones, but with
    ATA/hardphones
    can you contact for free users of the biggest VOIP network around? that
    being skype?

    Love it or hate Skype still has more users than any other kind of VOIP
    service, technically I guess you could
    say MSN and yahoo are also voip services now but you get the point.

    Don't get me wrong I understand the benefits of an ATA or hardphone, I have
    collection of hardphones and ATA
    units here, which I use, but the family and friends I have don't want to to
    pay money for an ATA or phone when they
    can use skype for free to talk to their other friends for free who are also
    on skype
    RH, Jul 14, 2006
    #6
  7. Gyuri

    jasee Guest

    Re: USB Phone with Yahoo messenger: now on the advantages of Sykpe

    Brian A wrote:
    > On 13 Jul 2006 10:35:28 -0700, "Gyuri" <>
    > wrote:
    > Why waste money on a USB box when you can get the real thing that will
    > connect to all your standard home phones.
    > Take a look at what Voip is really about on www.voip-info.org
    > Start with ' Getting Started' part way down the page.
    > Then come back here and ask some more. My advice: Forget about toytown
    > Skype and spend your money on the real thing!


    The advantage of Skype (unlike 'real' voip) is it's almost unstoppable. You
    should be able to plug your phone into almost any pc anywhere with a
    internet connection & with sufficient permission to install the device
    itself and send and receive. Blocking it on a firwall/router is ppretty
    difficult.
    jasee, Jul 14, 2006
    #7
  8. Gyuri

    The Invalid Guest

    On Fri, 14 Jul 2006 08:32:14 +0100, "RH"
    <> wrote:

    >
    >Its all well and good you singing the praises of ATA hardphones, but with
    >ATA/hardphones
    >can you contact for free users of the biggest VOIP network around? that
    >being skype?
    >

    And also Sype sound and Videocam quality on P2P is superb as is the
    quality on Skypeout
    The Invalid, Jul 14, 2006
    #8
  9. Gyuri

    Ivor Jones Guest

    "The Invalid" <> wrote in message
    news:
    > On Fri, 14 Jul 2006 08:32:14 +0100, "RH"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > > Its all well and good you singing the praises of ATA
    > > hardphones, but with ATA/hardphones
    > > can you contact for free users of the biggest VOIP
    > > network around? that being skype?


    Just because someone uses Skype does that automatically mean I want to
    call them..?! Skype uses proprietary protocols which mean I cannot use my
    own equipment. I don't like using PC based systems for phone calls any
    more than I like emails being converted to speech and played to me over
    the phone.

    Besides, 90% of the people I call regularly use Sipgate so whether or not
    Skype is the biggest system around is irrelevant to me. I probably know
    about half a dozen people who use Skype, all but a couple also use Sipgate
    so I am losing very little by not using Skype.

    > And also Sype sound and Videocam quality on P2P is superb
    > as is the quality on Skypeout


    The last thing I want when I'm on the phone is video calling..! The way I
    look when someone calls me (usually when I'm still in bed or just out of
    the bath..!) it wouldn't be a pretty sight..!

    I suppose if you want video calling then Skype is ok, but SIP can support
    video calling with the right equipment so it isn't exclusive to PC based
    systems.


    Ivor
    Ivor Jones, Jul 14, 2006
    #9
  10. Gyuri

    JC Guest

    Re: USB Phone with Yahoo messenger: now on the advantages of Sykpe

    On Fri, 14 Jul 2006 09:33:47 +0100, "jasee" <>
    wrote:

    >The advantage of Skype (unlike 'real' voip) is it's almost unstoppable. You
    >should be able to plug your phone into almost any pc anywhere with a
    >internet connection & with sufficient permission to install the device
    >itself and send and receive. Blocking it on a firwall/router is ppretty
    >difficult.


    Actually, blocking Skype is trivially easy on any professional
    firewall. It's just that most domestic routers will allow a reply back
    to traffic sent on any port. Given the way that one Skype PC can be
    capable of taking down an entire network, I'd expect to see a LOT more
    Skype blocking in future while other technologies such as
    SIP/Jingle/IAX etc, may be allowed to pass unhindered.

    In fact it's much easier to guarantee QoS (quality of service) with
    SIP etc at the router level, while this is almost impossible with
    Skype given it's peer-to-peer nature. There are lots of other pros and
    cons of the proprietary Skype protocol, but I just can't see such a
    proprietary system with all it's failings ever being anything more
    than a supplement to more resilient services.

    IMHO the only way for Skype to expand (quality of service wise) beyond
    limited desktop and secondary mobile services is to open up and
    re-engineer the way their service works. What they do have is a
    massive installed base, so such re-enginerring would be trivially easy
    via a software update. When that happens then maybe, just maybe,
    they'll stand a chance of being unstoppable.

    Rgds
    Jonathan
    --
    Free UK based SIP accounts with ENUM/Sipbroker calling at
    www.kcip.com.
    JC, Jul 15, 2006
    #10
  11. Gyuri

    jasee Guest

    Re: USB Phone with Yahoo messenger: now on the advantages of Sykpe

    JC wrote:
    > On Fri, 14 Jul 2006 09:33:47 +0100, "jasee" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> The advantage of Skype (unlike 'real' voip) is it's almost
    >> unstoppable. You should be able to plug your phone into almost any
    >> pc anywhere with a internet connection & with sufficient permission
    >> to install the device itself and send and receive. Blocking it on a
    >> firwall/router is ppretty difficult.

    >
    > Actually, blocking Skype is trivially easy on any professional
    > firewall. It's just that most domestic routers will allow a reply back
    > to traffic sent on any port. Given the way that one Skype PC can be
    > capable of taking down an entire network, I'd expect to see a LOT more
    > Skype blocking in future while other technologies such as
    > SIP/Jingle/IAX etc, may be allowed to pass unhindered.


    What do you mean by a "professional" firewall? Most firewalls (as in adsl
    routers (for instance) do a simplified version of SPI that does nothing for
    Skype), but that doesn't stop it getting out anyway.

    I'd be interested to read any examples of it being so 'trivially easy' to
    block. The Chinese apparently were having some difficulty until just
    recently.
    jasee, Jul 15, 2006
    #11
  12. Gyuri

    JC Guest

    Re: USB Phone with Yahoo messenger: now on the advantages of Sykpe

    On Sat, 15 Jul 2006 21:03:54 +0100, "jasee" <>
    wrote:

    >What do you mean by a "professional" firewall? Most firewalls (as in adsl
    >routers (for instance) do a simplified version of SPI that does nothing for
    >Skype), but that doesn't stop it getting out anyway.


    Sorry, I was referring to "Enterprise" products such as the Cisco PIX
    range, though I'm sure there must be many other and cheaper
    alternatives and was thinking in relation to large campus or company
    networks, not whole ISPs.

    >I'd be interested to read any examples of it being so 'trivially easy' to
    >block. The Chinese apparently were having some difficulty until just
    >recently.


    As I understand Skype, it'll try direct connections using it's own
    port selections, finally falling back to ports 80 and 443. You just
    need a firewall that's able to (in Cisco terms) "fix up" these ports -
    basically a bit like a transparent, non-caching proxy that only allows
    valid requests for the fixed up protocol in and out. Certainly
    blocking all outbound port access, then providing fix up on all the
    (many) permitted services (dns/http/https/smtp/ftp/sip etc) should
    secure a network. Interestingly the PIX supports fixup for SIP
    (allowing it to work if required) while of course not supporting the
    "secret" proprietary Skype protocol.

    Obviously just scaling this to an ISP or entire country would cause
    problems for all sorts of services, however many ISPs have transparent
    proxies (yuck) and combined with a bit of DNS and port filtering I can
    see this being quite effective. I understand a similar system is used
    in some middle east and african countries.

    If the chinese were having problems, then I suspect it would be
    because of both the scale of the countries network and the need to
    allow other non-standard services limited external access. I've heard
    (unsubstantiated) reports that they appear to prefer the subtle
    approach - allow everything, rate limit and filter the known banned
    sites, then arrest those who talk or email about banned subjects.

    Rgds
    Jonathan
    JC, Jul 16, 2006
    #12
  13. Gyuri

    jasee Guest

    Re: USB Phone with Yahoo messenger: now on the advantages of Sykpe

    JC wrote:
    > On Sat, 15 Jul 2006 21:03:54 +0100, "jasee" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> What do you mean by a "professional" firewall? Most firewalls (as in
    >> adsl routers (for instance) do a simplified version of SPI that does
    >> nothing for Skype), but that doesn't stop it getting out anyway.

    >
    > Sorry, I was referring to "Enterprise" products such as the Cisco PIX
    > range, though I'm sure there must be many other and cheaper
    > alternatives and was thinking in relation to large campus or company
    > networks, not whole ISPs.


    Well, I'd be interested to hear of any that don't require another router.
    Obviously it is (at the moment) relatively easy to block initial call using
    (for instance) an independent specialised router running Linux for instance
    (and that will prevent connection). However, using it as a router is not a
    trivial task anyway.
    AFAICT there is nothing availble in the general range of ADSL routers which
    is capable for doing this. (If there is, I'd be interested to know). So I
    certainly wouldn't say it is trivially easy for the majority of small
    businesses who haven't got the money to buy Cisco routers (for instance)
    just for this purpose

    >
    >> I'd be interested to read any examples of it being so 'trivially
    >> easy' to block. The Chinese apparently were having some difficulty
    >> until just recently.

    >
    > As I understand Skype, it'll try direct connections using it's own
    > port selections, finally falling back to ports 80 and 443. You just
    > need a firewall that's able to (in Cisco terms) "fix up" these ports -
    > basically a bit like a transparent, non-caching proxy that only allows
    > valid requests for the fixed up protocol in and out. Certainly
    > blocking all outbound port access, then providing fix up on all the
    > (many) permitted services (dns/http/https/smtp/ftp/sip etc) should
    > secure a network. Interestingly the PIX supports fixup for SIP
    > (allowing it to work if required) while of course not supporting the
    > "secret" proprietary Skype protocol.


    Not familiar with some of these terms.

    The simpler approach involves blocking direct requests to ip addresses
    rather than resolving dns which I would thought would have blocked
    legitimate traffic as well, so I wouldn't have thought this would be
    desirable.

    I don't see how just letting out https (for instance) is going to stop Skype
    (as that is exactly what it can use). Using what appear to be 'valid
    requests'.

    The only way of doing this is to be able to inspect the contents of the data
    packets (not the intial packets which aren't encripted) which requires
    knowing the encription algorithms (which have been, up to just recently)
    kept secret/not been cracked)
    >
    > Obviously just scaling this to an ISP or entire country would cause
    > problems for all sorts of services, however many ISPs have transparent
    > proxies (yuck) and combined with a bit of DNS and port filtering I can
    > see this being quite effective. I understand a similar system is used
    > in some middle east and african countries.



    Do you have a reference for this?
    (Still don't see how in the way you've described (see above))


    >
    > If the chinese were having problems, then I suspect it would be
    > because of both the scale of the countries network and the need to
    > allow other non-standard services limited external access. I've heard
    > (unsubstantiated) reports that they appear to prefer the subtle
    > approach - allow everything, rate limit and filter the known banned
    > sites, then arrest those who talk or email about banned subjects.


    It's nothing to do with that. It's apparently the threat to conventional
    telephone services that have caused them to take action. If they were
    worried about external influences, than they'd start banning chat programs
    which I know work quite freely between here and China (I have had a number
    of Chinese students here). QQ (the main Chinese chat client apparently has
    over 150 million users.
    jasee, Jul 17, 2006
    #13
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