USB Flash Drive

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Keith nuttle, Dec 28, 2008.

  1. Keith nuttle

    Keith nuttle Guest

    Now that USB Flash Drives are quite cheap, ($19 for 16g at Fry's) they
    are looking more attractive as backup.

    I have a laptop and desktop. They both run Windows XP and are connected
    in a wireless lan. I keep the files on both computers synced with
    Syncback, so have two copies of all of my files.

    Would a 16g or 32g USB Flash Drive provide reliable third backup?

    What is their lifetime? in hours, accesses, or whatever.
     
    Keith nuttle, Dec 28, 2008
    #1
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  2. Keith nuttle schrieb:
    > Now that USB Flash Drives are quite cheap, ($19 for 16g at Fry's) they
    > are looking more attractive as backup.
    >
    > I have a laptop and desktop. They both run Windows XP and are connected
    > in a wireless lan. I keep the files on both computers synced with
    > Syncback, so have two copies of all of my files.
    >
    > Would a 16g or 32g USB Flash Drive provide reliable third backup?
    >
    > What is their lifetime? in hours, accesses, or whatever.


    The are quite reliable IF they are not faked stuff...

    There where several people testing the drives with millions of write
    accesses to the same logical location. As long as you're not damaging
    these thins mechanically, you should be quite save. I don't know about
    long term stability, but it should be several years at least.

    For sure it is not a bad Idea as additional backup, but 16G is not
    really a lot for a collection of digital images :)

    kruemi

    --
    Dimage A2, Agfa isolette
    http://flickr.com/photos/kruemi
    And a cool timekiller: http://www.starpirates.net/register.php?referer=9708
     
    Marco Tedaldi, Dec 28, 2008
    #2
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  3. Keith nuttle

    23DAVID1 Guest

    Be careful when buying cheap USB drives. We are finding many have hidden
    files on them that transfer over to your computer when connected. It's just
    another method to infect computer systems with malicious programs.
     
    23DAVID1, Dec 29, 2008
    #3
  4. Keith nuttle

    nospam Guest

    In article <ntX5l.3994$>, 23DAVID1
    <> wrote:

    > Be careful when buying cheap USB drives. We are finding many have hidden
    > files on them that transfer over to your computer when connected. It's just
    > another method to infect computer systems with malicious programs.


    nonsense.
     
    nospam, Dec 29, 2008
    #4
  5. Keith nuttle

    23DAVID1 Guest

    "nospam" <> wrote in message
    news:281220082249001796%...
    > In article <ntX5l.3994$>, 23DAVID1
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> Be careful when buying cheap USB drives. We are finding many have hidden
    >> files on them that transfer over to your computer when connected. It's
    >> just
    >> another method to infect computer systems with malicious programs.

    >
    > nonsense.


    It's an simple way to spread worms and Trojans. Load them up on a bunch of
    cheap USB drives and flashcards and leave them in places where people can
    easily find them. They are cheap to buy and easy to place in places where
    they can be found quickly.

    You don't click on suspicious emails or links, why would you plug in a
    flashcard or USB drive into your computer that you found sitting on a chair
    or library table? How do you know it's harmless?
     
    23DAVID1, Dec 29, 2008
    #5
  6. Keith nuttle

    nospam Guest

    In article <k2Y5l.3995$>, 23DAVID1
    <> wrote:

    > >> Be careful when buying cheap USB drives. We are finding many have hidden
    > >> files on them that transfer over to your computer when connected. It's
    > >> just
    > >> another method to infect computer systems with malicious programs.

    > >
    > > nonsense.

    >
    > It's an simple way to spread worms and Trojans. Load them up on a bunch of
    > cheap USB drives and flashcards and leave them in places where people can
    > easily find them. They are cheap to buy and easy to place in places where
    > they can be found quickly.


    > You don't click on suspicious emails or links, why would you plug in a
    > flashcard or USB drive into your computer that you found sitting on a chair
    > or library table? How do you know it's harmless?


    the issue is *buying* a new drive, not plugging one in that was found
    on a chair someplace.
     
    nospam, Dec 29, 2008
    #6
  7. Keith nuttle

    23DAVID1 Guest

    "nospam" <> wrote in message
    news:281220082348034285%...
    > In article <k2Y5l.3995$>, 23DAVID1
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> >> Be careful when buying cheap USB drives. We are finding many have
    >> >> hidden
    >> >> files on them that transfer over to your computer when connected. It's
    >> >> just
    >> >> another method to infect computer systems with malicious programs.
    >> >
    >> > nonsense.

    >>
    >> It's an simple way to spread worms and Trojans. Load them up on a bunch
    >> of
    >> cheap USB drives and flashcards and leave them in places where people can
    >> easily find them. They are cheap to buy and easy to place in places where
    >> they can be found quickly.

    >
    >> You don't click on suspicious emails or links, why would you plug in a
    >> flashcard or USB drive into your computer that you found sitting on a
    >> chair
    >> or library table? How do you know it's harmless?

    >
    > the issue is *buying* a new drive, not plugging one in that was found
    > on a chair someplace.


    Even "off the shelf'" devices can be suspect especially when they come
    bundled with pre-loaded software.

    I test all my new drives and flashcards through a isolated test machine
    which wipes and re-formats the drive.

    You can never be too safe, it's a scary world out there...

    23DAVID1
     
    23DAVID1, Dec 29, 2008
    #7
  8. Keith nuttle

    Shawn Hirn Guest

    In article <ZNY5l.3997$>,
    "23DAVID1" <> wrote:

    > "nospam" <> wrote in message
    > news:281220082348034285%...
    > > In article <k2Y5l.3995$>, 23DAVID1
    > > <> wrote:
    > >
    > >> >> Be careful when buying cheap USB drives. We are finding many have
    > >> >> hidden
    > >> >> files on them that transfer over to your computer when connected. It's
    > >> >> just
    > >> >> another method to infect computer systems with malicious programs.
    > >> >
    > >> > nonsense.
    > >>
    > >> It's an simple way to spread worms and Trojans. Load them up on a bunch
    > >> of
    > >> cheap USB drives and flashcards and leave them in places where people can
    > >> easily find them. They are cheap to buy and easy to place in places where
    > >> they can be found quickly.

    > >
    > >> You don't click on suspicious emails or links, why would you plug in a
    > >> flashcard or USB drive into your computer that you found sitting on a
    > >> chair
    > >> or library table? How do you know it's harmless?

    > >
    > > the issue is *buying* a new drive, not plugging one in that was found
    > > on a chair someplace.

    >
    > Even "off the shelf'" devices can be suspect especially when they come
    > bundled with pre-loaded software.
    >
    > I test all my new drives and flashcards through a isolated test machine
    > which wipes and re-formats the drive.
    >
    > You can never be too safe, it's a scary world out there...


    I use a Mac, so its not a big concern for me. Nothing gets installed on
    my Mac without me knowing it (and approving it). Still, I am curious if
    this has ever happened. Has a USB jump drive directly from a store been
    a vector for malware? If so, do you have proof of it, or are you just
    being paranoid?
     
    Shawn Hirn, Dec 29, 2008
    #8
  9. Shawn Hirn <> wrote:
    >Has a USB jump drive directly from a store been
    >a vector for malware?


    It is very common for USB- and other drives to come preloaded with
    software which installs automatically when connected to the computer for
    the first time. For many people this constitutes malware.

    If you agree or not probably depends on your definition of malware.

    jue
     
    Jürgen Exner, Dec 29, 2008
    #9
  10. Keith nuttle

    TheRealSteve Guest

    On Mon, 29 Dec 2008 07:58:25 -0500, Shawn Hirn <>
    wrote:

    >In article <ZNY5l.3997$>,
    > "23DAVID1" <> wrote:
    >
    >> "nospam" <> wrote in message
    >> news:281220082348034285%...
    >> > In article <k2Y5l.3995$>, 23DAVID1
    >> > <> wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> >> Be careful when buying cheap USB drives. We are finding many have
    >> >> >> hidden
    >> >> >> files on them that transfer over to your computer when connected. It's
    >> >> >> just
    >> >> >> another method to infect computer systems with malicious programs.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > nonsense.
    >> >>
    >> >> It's an simple way to spread worms and Trojans. Load them up on a bunch
    >> >> of
    >> >> cheap USB drives and flashcards and leave them in places where people can
    >> >> easily find them. They are cheap to buy and easy to place in places where
    >> >> they can be found quickly.
    >> >
    >> >> You don't click on suspicious emails or links, why would you plug in a
    >> >> flashcard or USB drive into your computer that you found sitting on a
    >> >> chair
    >> >> or library table? How do you know it's harmless?
    >> >
    >> > the issue is *buying* a new drive, not plugging one in that was found
    >> > on a chair someplace.

    >>
    >> Even "off the shelf'" devices can be suspect especially when they come
    >> bundled with pre-loaded software.
    >>
    >> I test all my new drives and flashcards through a isolated test machine
    >> which wipes and re-formats the drive.
    >>
    >> You can never be too safe, it's a scary world out there...

    >
    >I use a Mac, so its not a big concern for me. Nothing gets installed on
    >my Mac without me knowing it (and approving it). Still, I am curious if
    >this has ever happened. Has a USB jump drive directly from a store been
    >a vector for malware? If so, do you have proof of it, or are you just
    >being paranoid?


    I don't know about USB jump drives but I don't see why not considering
    that several types of devices have had nasty viruses (not just
    "malware", which could be anything you don't want, but virus) on them
    directly from a store.

    First, you have Apple iPods. From Apple (who of course puts a minimal
    spin on it, you can find better articles on google):

    http://www.apple.com/support/windowsvirus/

    And Creative Labs MP3 players:

    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2005/09/01/creative_mp3_player_virus_flap/

    And Seagate/Maxtor hard drives. From Seagate (who again puts a
    minimal spin on it):

    http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/support/downloads/personal_storage/ps3200-sw

    And digital photo frames:

    http://tech.yahoo.com/blog/null/66647

    And TomTom GPS units:

    http://news.zdnet.com/2100-1009_22-151043.html

    I'm sure there's others so why not USB drives also?

    Steve
     
    TheRealSteve, Dec 29, 2008
    #10
  11. Keith nuttle

    Pat Guest

    On Dec 28, 12:30 pm, Keith nuttle <> wrote:
    > Now that USB Flash Drives are quite cheap, ($19 for 16g at Fry's) they
    > are looking more attractive as backup.
    >
    > I have a laptop and desktop.  They both run Windows XP and are connected
    > in a wireless lan.  I keep the files on both computers synced with
    > Syncback, so have two copies of all of my files.
    >
    > Would a 16g or 32g USB Flash Drive provide reliable third backup?
    >
    > What is their lifetime?  in hours, accesses, or whatever.


    For the cost of 2.5 of those drives, you can get a 1 year subscription
    to Carbonite (www.carbonite.com) and have it keep your backups for
    you. It is automatic and off site.

    I've used them for years. The "off site" part is particularly
    important to me. It mitigates a lot of problems. If a hurricane/
    flood/fire/earthquake takes out your computer, it'll probably take out
    your flash drive collection, too. Off site products will hopefully
    survive.
     
    Pat, Dec 29, 2008
    #11
  12. Keith nuttle

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, John Navas
    <> wrote:

    > That new drive might well have been bought, infected, returned, and
    > resold.


    then it's not a new drive.
     
    nospam, Dec 29, 2008
    #12
  13. Keith nuttle

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, John Navas
    <> wrote:

    > >> I test all my new drives and flashcards through a isolated test machine
    > >> which wipes and re-formats the drive.
    > >>
    > >> You can never be too safe, it's a scary world out there...

    > >
    > >I use a Mac, so its not a big concern for me.

    >
    > No offense, but that's dangerously naive.


    actually, it's not naive at all. it's a very accurate assessment of the
    risk.
     
    nospam, Dec 29, 2008
    #13
  14. Pat <> wrote:
    >For the cost of 2.5 of those drives, you can get a 1 year subscription
    >to Carbonite (www.carbonite.com) and have it keep your backups for
    >you. It is automatic and off site.


    I hope for your sake that you are encrypting your files with at least a
    128bit encryption code before sending them offsite. At least that will
    stop the more casual crackers.

    jue
     
    Jürgen Exner, Dec 29, 2008
    #14
  15. Keith nuttle

    23DAVID1 Guest

    "nospam" <> wrote in message
    > In article <>, John Navas
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> That new drive might well have been bought, infected, returned, and
    >> resold.

    >
    > then it's not a new drive.


    What the public never knew didn't hurt them. I've sold hundreds of custom
    machines and at least one part on every machine was considered used or
    recycled. They all ran fine and when they didn't we just swapped out the
    defective parts for new ones. Customer always went away happy.

    Besides isn't your car nothing but used parts? That is if you are old
    enough to drive of course.
     
    23DAVID1, Dec 29, 2008
    #15
  16. Keith nuttle

    SneakyP Guest

    Jürgen Exner <> wrote in
    news::

    > Shawn Hirn <> wrote:
    >>Has a USB jump drive directly from a store been
    >>a vector for malware?

    >
    > It is very common for USB- and other drives to come preloaded with
    > software which installs automatically when connected to the computer for
    > the first time. For many people this constitutes malware.
    >
    > If you agree or not probably depends on your definition of malware.
    >
    > jue
    >

    Ah yes, preloaded stuff does have a habit of infecting disks too.
    Remember the Sony debacle -the root kit installer those scumwads tried to
    pass off to the public?

    Too bad my desktop has a habit of scanning every single time a connection
    is made to any device. Too bad for the marketoid sleazebags that is.



    --
    SneakyP
    To reply: newsgroup only, what's posted in ng stays in ng.

    Some choose to swim in the potty bowl of nan-ae rather than flush it
    down :0)
     
    SneakyP, Dec 30, 2008
    #16
  17. Keith nuttle

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, John Navas
    <> wrote:

    > >> Yes, but you also have to balance the malware risk with the real risk that
    > >> anti-virus software will interfere with legitimate operations.
    > >>

    > >Yes, in the business world, that is known as 'loss prevention'.
    > >Example: You run a small jewelry store. You have installed a monitored
    > >burglar alarm, and you get robbed. The police arrive 2 minutes after
    > >the robbers have left. You lose $30,000 worth (wholesale price) of
    > >merchandise. So, is it economically feasible to hire an armed guard at
    > >the rate of $50,000 a year? Of course not, unless the robberies happen
    > >more than once a year. It's called 'loss prevention', and the basic
    > >rule is "Don't spend more on protection than the probably losses."

    >
    > It's not that simple. Proper assessment takes game theory, calculating
    > both the impact of loss and the probability of that loss.
    >
    > If the probability of loss is near certain, then it's worth spending
    > almost as much on protection. If the probability of loss is very low,
    > then it may not be worth spending much on protection, except that if the
    > impact of the loss is devastating, then it may still be worth spending a
    > great deal on protection.
    >
    > That last is germane to malware infection, which can be quite
    > devastating, in (for example) cases of identity theft and loss of
    > financial information. Severe cases of malware can also be quite
    > difficult and expensive to remove. In comparison, malware protection is
    > inexpensive (even free) and unobtrusive. These are reasons why most
    > experts think malware protection on _any_ system is essential.


    and as has been noted (in another thread) that in some cases, some
    malware protection can cause more damage than the malware against which
    it claims to protect.

    as you say, it's not that simple.
     
    nospam, Dec 31, 2008
    #17
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