UPS setup question

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Wayne McClain, Feb 27, 2005.

  1. I have a wall power outlet that I plan to plug three PC's and one CRT
    monitor into, as well as a 5.1 speaker system, KVM switch, SOHO router and
    cable modem. I'm connecting all theses devices to only one outlet because
    there are no other outlets close enough to also use.

    I want to get a UPS for filtering out "dirty" electricity and for power
    backup for the main components (the PCs, monitor & speakers). I'm leaning
    toward either an APC BR1500, which has 1500VA/865W and six outlets with
    battery backup...

    http://www.apcc.com/resource/include/techspec_index.cfm?base_sku=BR1500

    ...or toward two APC Conext CNB900 units. Each CNB900 has 900VA/500W and
    four outlets with battery backup...

    http://www.compusa.com/products/product_info.asp?product_code=282177

    The backup times won’t have to last for very long, so either setup would be
    sufficient.

    My question is whether or not it would be OK to use only one UPS unit with
    865-watt capacity and have all these components connected to it. Or if it
    would be better to use two UPS units with 500-watt capacity each and
    distribute the components evenly between them. I don't know whether it
    would be safer to distribute all the major devices between two different
    UPS's on the same outlet, or if it’s fine to have everything going through
    only one UPS on the same outlet (and keeping the second plug on the outlet
    empty). If it doesn’t make a difference, I would prefer to use only one
    UPS unit for everything...

    TIA
     
    Wayne McClain, Feb 27, 2005
    #1
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  2. Wayne McClain wrote:
    > I have a wall power outlet that I plan to plug three PC's and one CRT
    > monitor into, as well as a 5.1 speaker system, KVM switch, SOHO router and
    > cable modem. I'm connecting all theses devices to only one outlet because
    > there are no other outlets close enough to also use.
    >
    > I want to get a UPS for filtering out "dirty" electricity and for power
    > backup for the main components (the PCs, monitor & speakers). I'm leaning
    > toward either an APC BR1500, which has 1500VA/865W and six outlets with
    > battery backup...
    >
    > http://www.apcc.com/resource/include/techspec_index.cfm?base_sku=BR1500
    >
    > ..or toward two APC Conext CNB900 units. Each CNB900 has 900VA/500W and
    > four outlets with battery backup...
    >
    > http://www.compusa.com/products/product_info.asp?product_code=282177
    >
    > The backup times won’t have to last for very long, so either setup would be
    > sufficient.
    >
    > My question is whether or not it would be OK to use only one UPS unit with
    > 865-watt capacity and have all these components connected to it. Or if it
    > would be better to use two UPS units with 500-watt capacity each and
    > distribute the components evenly between them. I don't know whether it
    > would be safer to distribute all the major devices between two different
    > UPS's on the same outlet, or if it’s fine to have everything going through
    > only one UPS on the same outlet (and keeping the second plug on the outlet
    > empty). If it doesn’t make a difference, I would prefer to use only one
    > UPS unit for everything...
    >
    > TIA


    Use one, the components won't overload the UPS. But what else is on that
    circuit? Flip off the breaker and see what stops running. It's better
    not to have a refrigerator, heater, toaster, hair dryer or anything that
    has a heavy draw on the same circuit.
     
    =?windows-1252?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=, Feb 27, 2005
    #2
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  3. ["Followup-To:" header set to 24hoursupport.helpdesk.]
    Wayne McClain wrote:

    > I have a wall power outlet that I plan to plug three PC's and one CRT
    > monitor into, as well as a 5.1 speaker system, KVM switch, SOHO router and
    > cable modem. I'm connecting all theses devices to only one outlet because
    > there are no other outlets close enough to also use.


    > I want to get a UPS for filtering out "dirty" electricity and for power
    > backup for the main components (the PCs, monitor & speakers). I'm leaning
    > toward either an APC BR1500, which has 1500VA/865W and six outlets with
    > battery backup...


    > http://www.apcc.com/resource/include/techspec_index.cfm?base_sku=BR1500


    > ..or toward two APC Conext CNB900 units. Each CNB900 has 900VA/500W and
    > four outlets with battery backup...


    > http://www.compusa.com/products/product_info.asp?product_code=282177


    > The backup times won’t have to last for very long, so either setup would be
    > sufficient.


    > My question is whether or not it would be OK to use only one UPS unit with
    > 865-watt capacity and have all these components connected to it. Or if it
    > would be better to use two UPS units with 500-watt capacity each and
    > distribute the components evenly between them. I don't know whether it
    > would be safer to distribute all the major devices between two different
    > UPS's on the same outlet, or if it’s fine to have everything going through
    > only one UPS on the same outlet (and keeping the second plug on the outlet
    > empty). If it doesn’t make a difference, I would prefer to use only one
    > UPS unit for everything...


    I have a couple thoughts. First, think about the old idea of small
    files still taking up X-sized clusters on your hard drive, with slack
    space making up the difference. Applying the same kind of idea to the
    two 500W units for 1000W and a single 865W unit, you'll probably end up
    *using* about the same capacity, because you'll probably come in under
    500W on each of the two units and the *total* "slack" (I use the term very
    loosely) will probably be greater there because there is chunk of slack
    on each of two units. That probably makes it a toss-up in terms of
    capacity; but the cost of two 500's is going to be more than one 1000W;
    so I'd probably lean to the one big unit. Second, I hope either
    solution proves to be adequate. You've got a lot of hardware, there.
    I just put in a 500W Belkin for one computer, one 19" CRT and my modem,
    and it couldn't handle that load. Instant blow upon powering up, even if
    I didn't have both monitor and system plugged in when I powered the UPS.
    I had to upgrade to a 660W unit. That that's significantly less gear than
    you're going to be using.

    --
    Blinky Linux Registered User 297263
    Who has implemented Usenet Solution #45933:
    Now killing all posts originating at Google Groups
     
    Blinky the Shark, Feb 27, 2005
    #3
  4. Wayne McClain

    127.0.0.1 Guest


    > Wayne McClain wrote:
    >> I have a wall power outlet that I plan to plug three PC's and one CRT
    >> monitor into, as well as a 5.1 speaker system, KVM switch, SOHO router
    >> and cable modem. I'm connecting all theses devices to only one outlet
    >> because there are no other outlets close enough to also use.
    >>
    >> I want to get a UPS for filtering out "dirty" electricity and for power
    >> backup for the main components (the PCs, monitor & speakers). I'm
    >> leaning toward either an APC BR1500, which has 1500VA/865W and six
    >> outlets with battery backup...
    >>
    >> http://www.apcc.com/resource/include/techspec_index.cfm?base_sku=BR1500
    >>
    >> ..or toward two APC Conext CNB900 units. Each CNB900 has 900VA/500W and
    >> four outlets with battery backup...
    >>
    >> http://www.compusa.com/products/product_info.asp?product_code=282177
    >>
    >> The backup times won’t have to last for very long, so either setup would
    >> be sufficient.
    >>
    >> My question is whether or not it would be OK to use only one UPS unit
    >> with 865-watt capacity and have all these components connected to it. Or
    >> if it would be better to use two UPS units with 500-watt capacity each
    >> and distribute the components evenly between them. I don't know whether
    >> it would be safer to distribute all the major devices between two
    >> different UPS's on the same outlet, or if it’s fine to have everything
    >> going through only one UPS on the same outlet (and keeping the second
    >> plug on the outlet empty). If it doesn’t make a difference, I would
    >> prefer to use only one UPS unit for everything...
    >>


    get a filtered powerstrip and a 500w UPS. connect the router/cablemodem/CPU
    box to the UPS and everything else to powerstrip. hookup the UPS serial
    cable (or ethernet, depends on type of UPS) to the CPU box). when
    configured, the UPS will tell your PC to shutdown during power outages.
    hooking up all the devices to one UPS will drain it much much quicker during
    outages.

    i have a liebert powersure 700 that does a good job for two CPU boxes. it
    also has a load indicator.

    -a|ex
     
    127.0.0.1, Feb 27, 2005
    #4
  5. Wayne McClain

    Toolman Tim Guest

    "Wayne McClain" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I have a wall power outlet that I plan to plug three PC's and one CRT
    > monitor into, as well as a 5.1 speaker system, KVM switch, SOHO router and
    > cable modem. I'm connecting all theses devices to only one outlet because
    > there are no other outlets close enough to also use.
    >
    > I want to get a UPS for filtering out "dirty" electricity and for power
    > backup for the main components (the PCs, monitor & speakers). I'm leaning
    > toward either an APC BR1500, which has 1500VA/865W and six outlets with
    > battery backup...
    >
    > http://www.apcc.com/resource/include/techspec_index.cfm?base_sku=BR1500
    >
    > ..or toward two APC Conext CNB900 units. Each CNB900 has 900VA/500W and
    > four outlets with battery backup...
    >
    > http://www.compusa.com/products/product_info.asp?product_code=282177
    >
    > The backup times won't have to last for very long, so either setup would
    > be
    > sufficient.
    >
    > My question is whether or not it would be OK to use only one UPS unit with
    > 865-watt capacity and have all these components connected to it. Or if it
    > would be better to use two UPS units with 500-watt capacity each and
    > distribute the components evenly between them. I don't know whether it
    > would be safer to distribute all the major devices between two different
    > UPS's on the same outlet, or if it's fine to have everything going through
    > only one UPS on the same outlet (and keeping the second plug on the outlet
    > empty). If it doesn't make a difference, I would prefer to use only one
    > UPS unit for everything...
    >
    > TIA


    You've got other replies addressing the power issue - I just wanted to post
    a warning. Do *not* plug laser type printers into a UPS. Dot matrix and
    inkjet printers are okay. The laser printer can be burned out by the
    non-sine wave power supplied by a UPS.
     
    Toolman Tim, Feb 27, 2005
    #5
  6. In article <>,
    Wayne McClain <> wrote:

    > I want to get a UPS for filtering out "dirty" electricity and for power
    > backup for the main components (the PCs, monitor & speakers). I'm leaning
    > toward either an APC BR1500, which has 1500VA/865W and six outlets with
    > battery backup...


    The Back-UPS line doesn't do a lot of power filtering. A Smart-UPS is a
    better choice for this, and has many other features besides. Ebay is a
    good option if you get sticker shock.

    --
    Steve Kives -- Unix sysadmin/netadmin -- Denver, CO
    Forward and fiaka, Manacle an den gosaka
     
    chocolatemalt, Feb 27, 2005
    #6
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