upgrade x86 to x64

Discussion in 'Windows 64bit' started by =?Utf-8?B?YWxleA==?=, Jul 17, 2006.

  1. hi,
    i recently installed windows vista x86(32 bit) but i was wondering if i
    would be able to upgrade it to the 64 bit version, how will i do this and
    what benifits are there if i do eg, better graphics? whats the deal with it?
    =?Utf-8?B?YWxleA==?=, Jul 17, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. =?Utf-8?B?YWxleA==?=

    John Boy Guest

    alex wrote:
    > hi,
    > i recently installed windows vista x86(32 bit) but i was wondering if i
    > would be able to upgrade it to the 64 bit version, how will i do this and
    > what benifits are there if i do eg, better graphics? whats the deal with it?


    Exactly the same way you would if you wanted to
    install Win x64 - you delete the 32-bit
    partition, then make a new blank partition and
    install the 64-bit version from scratch. A
    clean install. You cannot "upgrade" from any
    32-bit version to a 64-bit version. You must do
    a clean install.

    You probably won't see any significant benefit
    at this time. There is less peripheral devices
    support in the 64-bit versions.

    You're probably better off sticking with 32-bit
    for now.
    John Boy, Jul 17, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. =?Utf-8?B?YWxleA==?=

    John Barnes Guest

    One can, however, run the appropriate version of Files and Settings transfer
    wizard to bring x64 to a more useable state, more quickly.
    It can, in fact, be a long and expensive project finding replacements for
    x86 software and hardware, and even then not all functions can be replaced.
    VMWare can assist, but who wants the hassle unless they are running programs
    that benefit from 64-bit and they are quite esoteric still.

    "John Boy" <> wrote in message
    news:elFA%...
    > alex wrote:
    >> hi,
    >> i recently installed windows vista x86(32 bit) but i was wondering if i
    >> would be able to upgrade it to the 64 bit version, how will i do this and
    >> what benifits are there if i do eg, better graphics? whats the deal with
    >> it?

    >
    > Exactly the same way you would if you wanted to install Win x64 - you
    > delete the 32-bit partition, then make a new blank partition and install
    > the 64-bit version from scratch. A clean install. You cannot "upgrade"
    > from any 32-bit version to a 64-bit version. You must do a clean install.
    >
    > You probably won't see any significant benefit at this time. There is
    > less peripheral devices support in the 64-bit versions.
    >
    > You're probably better off sticking with 32-bit for now.
    John Barnes, Jul 17, 2006
    #3
  4. John, he is talking about Vista. FAST is XP Pro x64, etc.

    "John Barnes" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > One can, however, run the appropriate version of Files and Settings
    > transfer wizard to bring x64 to a more useable state, more quickly.
    > It can, in fact, be a long and expensive project finding replacements for
    > x86 software and hardware, and even then not all functions can be
    > replaced. VMWare can assist, but who wants the hassle unless they are
    > running programs that benefit from 64-bit and they are quite esoteric
    > still.
    >
    > "John Boy" <> wrote in message
    > news:elFA%...
    >> alex wrote:
    >>> hi,
    >>> i recently installed windows vista x86(32 bit) but i was wondering if i
    >>> would be able to upgrade it to the 64 bit version, how will i do this
    >>> and what benifits are there if i do eg, better graphics? whats the deal
    >>> with it?

    >>
    >> Exactly the same way you would if you wanted to install Win x64 - you
    >> delete the 32-bit partition, then make a new blank partition and install
    >> the 64-bit version from scratch. A clean install. You cannot "upgrade"
    >> from any 32-bit version to a 64-bit version. You must do a clean
    >> install.
    >>
    >> You probably won't see any significant benefit at this time. There is
    >> less peripheral devices support in the 64-bit versions.
    >>
    >> You're probably better off sticking with 32-bit for now.

    >
    >
    Colin Barnhorst, Jul 17, 2006
    #4
  5. No advantage.

    You cannot upgrade any x86 system to its x64 sibling.

    If you just want to see what Vista x64 looks and feels like why not install
    it on an empty partition or drive and multiboot both Vistas?

    "alex" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > hi,
    > i recently installed windows vista x86(32 bit) but i was wondering if i
    > would be able to upgrade it to the 64 bit version, how will i do this and
    > what benifits are there if i do eg, better graphics? whats the deal with
    > it?
    Colin Barnhorst, Jul 17, 2006
    #5
  6. =?Utf-8?B?YWxleA==?=

    John Barnes Guest

    I take it then, that there is no version of files and settings transfer
    wizard to go from Vista86 to Vista64. There certainly will be a need for
    all sorts of that program when the system is finalised. I would expect many
    to go from x86 to Vista64 (at least if your predictions are correct).


    "Colin Barnhorst" <colinbarharst(remove)@msn.com> wrote in message
    news:%...
    > John, he is talking about Vista. FAST is XP Pro x64, etc.
    >
    > "John Barnes" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> One can, however, run the appropriate version of Files and Settings
    >> transfer wizard to bring x64 to a more useable state, more quickly.
    >> It can, in fact, be a long and expensive project finding replacements for
    >> x86 software and hardware, and even then not all functions can be
    >> replaced. VMWare can assist, but who wants the hassle unless they are
    >> running programs that benefit from 64-bit and they are quite esoteric
    >> still.
    >>
    >> "John Boy" <> wrote in message
    >> news:elFA%...
    >>> alex wrote:
    >>>> hi,
    >>>> i recently installed windows vista x86(32 bit) but i was wondering if i
    >>>> would be able to upgrade it to the 64 bit version, how will i do this
    >>>> and what benifits are there if i do eg, better graphics? whats the deal
    >>>> with it?
    >>>
    >>> Exactly the same way you would if you wanted to install Win x64 - you
    >>> delete the 32-bit partition, then make a new blank partition and install
    >>> the 64-bit version from scratch. A clean install. You cannot "upgrade"
    >>> from any 32-bit version to a 64-bit version. You must do a clean
    >>> install.
    >>>
    >>> You probably won't see any significant benefit at this time. There is
    >>> less peripheral devices support in the 64-bit versions.
    >>>
    >>> You're probably better off sticking with 32-bit for now.

    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    John Barnes, Jul 17, 2006
    #6
  7. It would be a clean install, not an upgrade.
    --
    Cari (MS-MVP) Windows Client - Printing & Imaging
    www.coribright.com/Windows


    "alex" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > hi,
    > i recently installed windows vista x86(32 bit) but i was wondering if i
    > would be able to upgrade it to the 64 bit version, how will i do this and
    > what benifits are there if i do eg, better graphics? whats the deal with
    > it?
    Cari \(MS-MVP\), Jul 17, 2006
    #7
  8. Yes, the migration tool will move files and settings between editions of
    Vista. It just isn't the FAST wizard anymore. It is the Windows Easy
    Transfer tool. You can see it by expanding the Welcome Center to show all
    items or by typing "easy" in Start Search.

    "John Barnes" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I take it then, that there is no version of files and settings transfer
    >wizard to go from Vista86 to Vista64. There certainly will be a need for
    >all sorts of that program when the system is finalised. I would expect many
    >to go from x86 to Vista64 (at least if your predictions are correct).
    >
    >
    > "Colin Barnhorst" <colinbarharst(remove)@msn.com> wrote in message
    > news:%...
    >> John, he is talking about Vista. FAST is XP Pro x64, etc.
    >>
    >> "John Barnes" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> One can, however, run the appropriate version of Files and Settings
    >>> transfer wizard to bring x64 to a more useable state, more quickly.
    >>> It can, in fact, be a long and expensive project finding replacements
    >>> for x86 software and hardware, and even then not all functions can be
    >>> replaced. VMWare can assist, but who wants the hassle unless they are
    >>> running programs that benefit from 64-bit and they are quite esoteric
    >>> still.
    >>>
    >>> "John Boy" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:elFA%...
    >>>> alex wrote:
    >>>>> hi,
    >>>>> i recently installed windows vista x86(32 bit) but i was wondering if
    >>>>> i would be able to upgrade it to the 64 bit version, how will i do
    >>>>> this and what benifits are there if i do eg, better graphics? whats
    >>>>> the deal with it?
    >>>>
    >>>> Exactly the same way you would if you wanted to install Win x64 - you
    >>>> delete the 32-bit partition, then make a new blank partition and
    >>>> install the 64-bit version from scratch. A clean install. You cannot
    >>>> "upgrade" from any 32-bit version to a 64-bit version. You must do a
    >>>> clean install.
    >>>>
    >>>> You probably won't see any significant benefit at this time. There is
    >>>> less peripheral devices support in the 64-bit versions.
    >>>>
    >>>> You're probably better off sticking with 32-bit for now.
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    Colin Barnhorst, Jul 17, 2006
    #8
  9. =?Utf-8?B?YWxleA==?=

    R. C. White Guest

    Hi, Alex.

    First, note that you installed Windows Vista BETA x86. As I'm sure you
    know, the RTM (Release to Manufacturing) version - often called the "Gold"
    version - is still several months away. We've been promised that we will be
    able to upgrade from WinXP to the RTM version of Vista. But upgrades to -
    and among - the various beta builds are still in the try-it-and-see phase.
    MS has asked us to try it and report what happens so that they can fix any
    problems that we find.

    In the meantime, many testers have upgraded from WinXP Pro SP2 x86 to Vista
    Beta 2 x86 (build 5384 and higher). (I tried it and failed because my
    System Partition is too small, even though I was upgrading on a different,
    much larger volume.)

    But there cannot be any upgrade path from any x86 operating system to any
    x64 operating system - or vice versa. The differences between 32-bit and
    64-bit drivers are too fundamental for the two systems to be compatible.
    Yes, we can run 32-bit applications in Vista x64, and we can run 32-bit
    Windows and Vista operating systems on 64-bit hardware, but we cannot
    upgrade from one platform to the other. We can only do a clean install of
    either from the other.

    We cannot even do a clean install of a 64-bit Windows/Vista while booted
    into 32-bit Windows/Vista. For example, when I want to clean install an x64
    version of a Vista beta, I must either boot from the x64 Vista DVD or boot
    into the x64 version of WinXP and run Vista x64 Setup from there, not from
    the x86 WinXP.

    As to the benefits of 64-bit, I'm sure there will be many soon, but there
    are not many yet. Hardware makers have been slow to write 64-bit drivers
    for their products, but there are many more 64-bit drivers now than just a
    year ago. Many manufacturers have said, "We'll be ready when Vista RTM
    arrives, but we are not going to try to hit a moving target during the beta
    testing period." Most 32-bit software runs just fine on 64-bit hardware and
    in 64-bit versions of WinXP and Vista, so software vendors have not felt
    much pressure to produce 64-bit versions of their products - yet. I'm sure
    they will respond to the market as soon as sufficient demand for 64-bit
    software appears.

    RC
    --
    R. C. White, CPA [RC]
    San Marcos, TX

    Microsoft Windows MVP
    (currently running Windows Mail 7 in Vista x64 Build 5456)

    "alex" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > hi,
    > i recently installed windows vista x86(32 bit) but i was wondering if i
    > would be able to upgrade it to the 64 bit version, how will i do this and
    > what benifits are there if i do eg, better graphics? whats the deal with
    > it?
    R. C. White, Jul 17, 2006
    #9
  10. yeah because when i tried doing a clean install of windows vista 64 bit from
    boot it said it coulnt read it so i imagine my computer just isnt compatible
    with 64 bit software? even though it does have the right specs... very
    strange, so the verdict for the moment anyway before software and hardware
    manufacturers have a goal to set for them selfs when vista final edition
    comes out, stick with the 32 bit?

    "R. C. White" wrote:

    > Hi, Alex.
    >
    > First, note that you installed Windows Vista BETA x86. As I'm sure you
    > know, the RTM (Release to Manufacturing) version - often called the "Gold"
    > version - is still several months away. We've been promised that we will be
    > able to upgrade from WinXP to the RTM version of Vista. But upgrades to -
    > and among - the various beta builds are still in the try-it-and-see phase.
    > MS has asked us to try it and report what happens so that they can fix any
    > problems that we find.
    >
    > In the meantime, many testers have upgraded from WinXP Pro SP2 x86 to Vista
    > Beta 2 x86 (build 5384 and higher). (I tried it and failed because my
    > System Partition is too small, even though I was upgrading on a different,
    > much larger volume.)
    >
    > But there cannot be any upgrade path from any x86 operating system to any
    > x64 operating system - or vice versa. The differences between 32-bit and
    > 64-bit drivers are too fundamental for the two systems to be compatible.
    > Yes, we can run 32-bit applications in Vista x64, and we can run 32-bit
    > Windows and Vista operating systems on 64-bit hardware, but we cannot
    > upgrade from one platform to the other. We can only do a clean install of
    > either from the other.
    >
    > We cannot even do a clean install of a 64-bit Windows/Vista while booted
    > into 32-bit Windows/Vista. For example, when I want to clean install an x64
    > version of a Vista beta, I must either boot from the x64 Vista DVD or boot
    > into the x64 version of WinXP and run Vista x64 Setup from there, not from
    > the x86 WinXP.
    >
    > As to the benefits of 64-bit, I'm sure there will be many soon, but there
    > are not many yet. Hardware makers have been slow to write 64-bit drivers
    > for their products, but there are many more 64-bit drivers now than just a
    > year ago. Many manufacturers have said, "We'll be ready when Vista RTM
    > arrives, but we are not going to try to hit a moving target during the beta
    > testing period." Most 32-bit software runs just fine on 64-bit hardware and
    > in 64-bit versions of WinXP and Vista, so software vendors have not felt
    > much pressure to produce 64-bit versions of their products - yet. I'm sure
    > they will respond to the market as soon as sufficient demand for 64-bit
    > software appears.
    >
    > RC
    > --
    > R. C. White, CPA [RC]
    > San Marcos, TX
    >
    > Microsoft Windows MVP
    > (currently running Windows Mail 7 in Vista x64 Build 5456)
    >
    > "alex" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > hi,
    > > i recently installed windows vista x86(32 bit) but i was wondering if i
    > > would be able to upgrade it to the 64 bit version, how will i do this and
    > > what benifits are there if i do eg, better graphics? whats the deal with
    > > it?

    >
    =?Utf-8?B?YWxleA==?=, Jul 18, 2006
    #10
  11. What processor do you have in your box?


    "alex" wrote:

    > yeah because when i tried doing a clean install of windows vista 64 bit from
    > boot it said it coulnt read it so i imagine my computer just isnt compatible
    > with 64 bit software? even though it does have the right specs... very
    > strange, so the verdict for the moment anyway before software and hardware
    > manufacturers have a goal to set for them selfs when vista final edition
    > comes out, stick with the 32 bit?
    >
    > "R. C. White" wrote:
    >
    > > Hi, Alex.
    > >
    > > First, note that you installed Windows Vista BETA x86. As I'm sure you
    > > know, the RTM (Release to Manufacturing) version - often called the "Gold"
    > > version - is still several months away. We've been promised that we will be
    > > able to upgrade from WinXP to the RTM version of Vista. But upgrades to -
    > > and among - the various beta builds are still in the try-it-and-see phase.
    > > MS has asked us to try it and report what happens so that they can fix any
    > > problems that we find.
    > >
    > > In the meantime, many testers have upgraded from WinXP Pro SP2 x86 to Vista
    > > Beta 2 x86 (build 5384 and higher). (I tried it and failed because my
    > > System Partition is too small, even though I was upgrading on a different,
    > > much larger volume.)
    > >
    > > But there cannot be any upgrade path from any x86 operating system to any
    > > x64 operating system - or vice versa. The differences between 32-bit and
    > > 64-bit drivers are too fundamental for the two systems to be compatible.
    > > Yes, we can run 32-bit applications in Vista x64, and we can run 32-bit
    > > Windows and Vista operating systems on 64-bit hardware, but we cannot
    > > upgrade from one platform to the other. We can only do a clean install of
    > > either from the other.
    > >
    > > We cannot even do a clean install of a 64-bit Windows/Vista while booted
    > > into 32-bit Windows/Vista. For example, when I want to clean install an x64
    > > version of a Vista beta, I must either boot from the x64 Vista DVD or boot
    > > into the x64 version of WinXP and run Vista x64 Setup from there, not from
    > > the x86 WinXP.
    > >
    > > As to the benefits of 64-bit, I'm sure there will be many soon, but there
    > > are not many yet. Hardware makers have been slow to write 64-bit drivers
    > > for their products, but there are many more 64-bit drivers now than just a
    > > year ago. Many manufacturers have said, "We'll be ready when Vista RTM
    > > arrives, but we are not going to try to hit a moving target during the beta
    > > testing period." Most 32-bit software runs just fine on 64-bit hardware and
    > > in 64-bit versions of WinXP and Vista, so software vendors have not felt
    > > much pressure to produce 64-bit versions of their products - yet. I'm sure
    > > they will respond to the market as soon as sufficient demand for 64-bit
    > > software appears.
    > >
    > > RC
    > > --
    > > R. C. White, CPA [RC]
    > > San Marcos, TX
    > >
    > > Microsoft Windows MVP
    > > (currently running Windows Mail 7 in Vista x64 Build 5456)
    > >
    > > "alex" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > > > hi,
    > > > i recently installed windows vista x86(32 bit) but i was wondering if i
    > > > would be able to upgrade it to the 64 bit version, how will i do this and
    > > > what benifits are there if i do eg, better graphics? whats the deal with
    > > > it?

    > >
    =?Utf-8?B?ZGZlaWZlcg==?=, Jul 18, 2006
    #11
  12. it's an intel pentium m740, 1.73 ghz.
    "dfeifer" wrote:

    > What processor do you have in your box?
    >
    >
    > "alex" wrote:
    >
    > > yeah because when i tried doing a clean install of windows vista 64 bit from
    > > boot it said it coulnt read it so i imagine my computer just isnt compatible
    > > with 64 bit software? even though it does have the right specs... very
    > > strange, so the verdict for the moment anyway before software and hardware
    > > manufacturers have a goal to set for them selfs when vista final edition
    > > comes out, stick with the 32 bit?
    > >
    > > "R. C. White" wrote:
    > >
    > > > Hi, Alex.
    > > >
    > > > First, note that you installed Windows Vista BETA x86. As I'm sure you
    > > > know, the RTM (Release to Manufacturing) version - often called the "Gold"
    > > > version - is still several months away. We've been promised that we will be
    > > > able to upgrade from WinXP to the RTM version of Vista. But upgrades to -
    > > > and among - the various beta builds are still in the try-it-and-see phase.
    > > > MS has asked us to try it and report what happens so that they can fix any
    > > > problems that we find.
    > > >
    > > > In the meantime, many testers have upgraded from WinXP Pro SP2 x86 to Vista
    > > > Beta 2 x86 (build 5384 and higher). (I tried it and failed because my
    > > > System Partition is too small, even though I was upgrading on a different,
    > > > much larger volume.)
    > > >
    > > > But there cannot be any upgrade path from any x86 operating system to any
    > > > x64 operating system - or vice versa. The differences between 32-bit and
    > > > 64-bit drivers are too fundamental for the two systems to be compatible.
    > > > Yes, we can run 32-bit applications in Vista x64, and we can run 32-bit
    > > > Windows and Vista operating systems on 64-bit hardware, but we cannot
    > > > upgrade from one platform to the other. We can only do a clean install of
    > > > either from the other.
    > > >
    > > > We cannot even do a clean install of a 64-bit Windows/Vista while booted
    > > > into 32-bit Windows/Vista. For example, when I want to clean install an x64
    > > > version of a Vista beta, I must either boot from the x64 Vista DVD or boot
    > > > into the x64 version of WinXP and run Vista x64 Setup from there, not from
    > > > the x86 WinXP.
    > > >
    > > > As to the benefits of 64-bit, I'm sure there will be many soon, but there
    > > > are not many yet. Hardware makers have been slow to write 64-bit drivers
    > > > for their products, but there are many more 64-bit drivers now than just a
    > > > year ago. Many manufacturers have said, "We'll be ready when Vista RTM
    > > > arrives, but we are not going to try to hit a moving target during the beta
    > > > testing period." Most 32-bit software runs just fine on 64-bit hardware and
    > > > in 64-bit versions of WinXP and Vista, so software vendors have not felt
    > > > much pressure to produce 64-bit versions of their products - yet. I'm sure
    > > > they will respond to the market as soon as sufficient demand for 64-bit
    > > > software appears.
    > > >
    > > > RC
    > > > --
    > > > R. C. White, CPA [RC]
    > > > San Marcos, TX
    > > >
    > > > Microsoft Windows MVP
    > > > (currently running Windows Mail 7 in Vista x64 Build 5456)
    > > >
    > > > "alex" <> wrote in message
    > > > news:...
    > > > > hi,
    > > > > i recently installed windows vista x86(32 bit) but i was wondering if i
    > > > > would be able to upgrade it to the 64 bit version, how will i do this and
    > > > > what benifits are there if i do eg, better graphics? whats the deal with
    > > > > it?
    > > >
    =?Utf-8?B?YWxleA==?=, Jul 18, 2006
    #12
  13. What specs do you have that suggests to you that the M740 is 64bit capable?
    I could find nothing in the Intel matrix to say it is. It does support
    Speed Step and DEP but there is no reference to the 64bit extended
    instruction set.

    "alex" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > it's an intel pentium m740, 1.73 ghz.
    > "dfeifer" wrote:
    >
    >> What processor do you have in your box?
    >>
    >>
    >> "alex" wrote:
    >>
    >> > yeah because when i tried doing a clean install of windows vista 64 bit
    >> > from
    >> > boot it said it coulnt read it so i imagine my computer just isnt
    >> > compatible
    >> > with 64 bit software? even though it does have the right specs... very
    >> > strange, so the verdict for the moment anyway before software and
    >> > hardware
    >> > manufacturers have a goal to set for them selfs when vista final
    >> > edition
    >> > comes out, stick with the 32 bit?
    >> >
    >> > "R. C. White" wrote:
    >> >
    >> > > Hi, Alex.
    >> > >
    >> > > First, note that you installed Windows Vista BETA x86. As I'm sure
    >> > > you
    >> > > know, the RTM (Release to Manufacturing) version - often called the
    >> > > "Gold"
    >> > > version - is still several months away. We've been promised that we
    >> > > will be
    >> > > able to upgrade from WinXP to the RTM version of Vista. But upgrades
    >> > > to -
    >> > > and among - the various beta builds are still in the try-it-and-see
    >> > > phase.
    >> > > MS has asked us to try it and report what happens so that they can
    >> > > fix any
    >> > > problems that we find.
    >> > >
    >> > > In the meantime, many testers have upgraded from WinXP Pro SP2 x86 to
    >> > > Vista
    >> > > Beta 2 x86 (build 5384 and higher). (I tried it and failed because
    >> > > my
    >> > > System Partition is too small, even though I was upgrading on a
    >> > > different,
    >> > > much larger volume.)
    >> > >
    >> > > But there cannot be any upgrade path from any x86 operating system to
    >> > > any
    >> > > x64 operating system - or vice versa. The differences between 32-bit
    >> > > and
    >> > > 64-bit drivers are too fundamental for the two systems to be
    >> > > compatible.
    >> > > Yes, we can run 32-bit applications in Vista x64, and we can run
    >> > > 32-bit
    >> > > Windows and Vista operating systems on 64-bit hardware, but we cannot
    >> > > upgrade from one platform to the other. We can only do a clean
    >> > > install of
    >> > > either from the other.
    >> > >
    >> > > We cannot even do a clean install of a 64-bit Windows/Vista while
    >> > > booted
    >> > > into 32-bit Windows/Vista. For example, when I want to clean install
    >> > > an x64
    >> > > version of a Vista beta, I must either boot from the x64 Vista DVD or
    >> > > boot
    >> > > into the x64 version of WinXP and run Vista x64 Setup from there, not
    >> > > from
    >> > > the x86 WinXP.
    >> > >
    >> > > As to the benefits of 64-bit, I'm sure there will be many soon, but
    >> > > there
    >> > > are not many yet. Hardware makers have been slow to write 64-bit
    >> > > drivers
    >> > > for their products, but there are many more 64-bit drivers now than
    >> > > just a
    >> > > year ago. Many manufacturers have said, "We'll be ready when Vista
    >> > > RTM
    >> > > arrives, but we are not going to try to hit a moving target during
    >> > > the beta
    >> > > testing period." Most 32-bit software runs just fine on 64-bit
    >> > > hardware and
    >> > > in 64-bit versions of WinXP and Vista, so software vendors have not
    >> > > felt
    >> > > much pressure to produce 64-bit versions of their products - yet.
    >> > > I'm sure
    >> > > they will respond to the market as soon as sufficient demand for
    >> > > 64-bit
    >> > > software appears.
    >> > >
    >> > > RC
    >> > > --
    >> > > R. C. White, CPA [RC]
    >> > > San Marcos, TX
    >> > >
    >> > > Microsoft Windows MVP
    >> > > (currently running Windows Mail 7 in Vista x64 Build 5456)
    >> > >
    >> > > "alex" <> wrote in message
    >> > > news:...
    >> > > > hi,
    >> > > > i recently installed windows vista x86(32 bit) but i was wondering
    >> > > > if i
    >> > > > would be able to upgrade it to the 64 bit version, how will i do
    >> > > > this and
    >> > > > what benifits are there if i do eg, better graphics? whats the deal
    >> > > > with
    >> > > > it?
    >> > >
    Colin Barnhorst, Jul 18, 2006
    #13
  14. when i ran the windows vista upgrade adviser, it said my computer would be
    able to support the ulitimate version of vista, i even emailed microsoft to
    ask what the difference between 32bit and 64bit operating sistems before i
    installed vista. i have them the results from the upgrade adviser and they
    said to me you would most likley to be able to run 64 bit version, stupidly
    enough i installed the wrong version of vista but that seems to be ok because
    it dosnt seem to be able to run 64 bit vista anyway. i mean if you did want
    to run 64bit operating systems what would you exactly need?

    "Colin Barnhorst" wrote:

    > What specs do you have that suggests to you that the M740 is 64bit capable?
    > I could find nothing in the Intel matrix to say it is. It does support
    > Speed Step and DEP but there is no reference to the 64bit extended
    > instruction set.
    >
    > "alex" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > >
    > > it's an intel pentium m740, 1.73 ghz.
    > > "dfeifer" wrote:
    > >
    > >> What processor do you have in your box?
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> "alex" wrote:
    > >>
    > >> > yeah because when i tried doing a clean install of windows vista 64 bit
    > >> > from
    > >> > boot it said it coulnt read it so i imagine my computer just isnt
    > >> > compatible
    > >> > with 64 bit software? even though it does have the right specs... very
    > >> > strange, so the verdict for the moment anyway before software and
    > >> > hardware
    > >> > manufacturers have a goal to set for them selfs when vista final
    > >> > edition
    > >> > comes out, stick with the 32 bit?
    > >> >
    > >> > "R. C. White" wrote:
    > >> >
    > >> > > Hi, Alex.
    > >> > >
    > >> > > First, note that you installed Windows Vista BETA x86. As I'm sure
    > >> > > you
    > >> > > know, the RTM (Release to Manufacturing) version - often called the
    > >> > > "Gold"
    > >> > > version - is still several months away. We've been promised that we
    > >> > > will be
    > >> > > able to upgrade from WinXP to the RTM version of Vista. But upgrades
    > >> > > to -
    > >> > > and among - the various beta builds are still in the try-it-and-see
    > >> > > phase.
    > >> > > MS has asked us to try it and report what happens so that they can
    > >> > > fix any
    > >> > > problems that we find.
    > >> > >
    > >> > > In the meantime, many testers have upgraded from WinXP Pro SP2 x86 to
    > >> > > Vista
    > >> > > Beta 2 x86 (build 5384 and higher). (I tried it and failed because
    > >> > > my
    > >> > > System Partition is too small, even though I was upgrading on a
    > >> > > different,
    > >> > > much larger volume.)
    > >> > >
    > >> > > But there cannot be any upgrade path from any x86 operating system to
    > >> > > any
    > >> > > x64 operating system - or vice versa. The differences between 32-bit
    > >> > > and
    > >> > > 64-bit drivers are too fundamental for the two systems to be
    > >> > > compatible.
    > >> > > Yes, we can run 32-bit applications in Vista x64, and we can run
    > >> > > 32-bit
    > >> > > Windows and Vista operating systems on 64-bit hardware, but we cannot
    > >> > > upgrade from one platform to the other. We can only do a clean
    > >> > > install of
    > >> > > either from the other.
    > >> > >
    > >> > > We cannot even do a clean install of a 64-bit Windows/Vista while
    > >> > > booted
    > >> > > into 32-bit Windows/Vista. For example, when I want to clean install
    > >> > > an x64
    > >> > > version of a Vista beta, I must either boot from the x64 Vista DVD or
    > >> > > boot
    > >> > > into the x64 version of WinXP and run Vista x64 Setup from there, not
    > >> > > from
    > >> > > the x86 WinXP.
    > >> > >
    > >> > > As to the benefits of 64-bit, I'm sure there will be many soon, but
    > >> > > there
    > >> > > are not many yet. Hardware makers have been slow to write 64-bit
    > >> > > drivers
    > >> > > for their products, but there are many more 64-bit drivers now than
    > >> > > just a
    > >> > > year ago. Many manufacturers have said, "We'll be ready when Vista
    > >> > > RTM
    > >> > > arrives, but we are not going to try to hit a moving target during
    > >> > > the beta
    > >> > > testing period." Most 32-bit software runs just fine on 64-bit
    > >> > > hardware and
    > >> > > in 64-bit versions of WinXP and Vista, so software vendors have not
    > >> > > felt
    > >> > > much pressure to produce 64-bit versions of their products - yet.
    > >> > > I'm sure
    > >> > > they will respond to the market as soon as sufficient demand for
    > >> > > 64-bit
    > >> > > software appears.
    > >> > >
    > >> > > RC
    > >> > > --
    > >> > > R. C. White, CPA [RC]
    > >> > > San Marcos, TX
    > >> > >
    > >> > > Microsoft Windows MVP
    > >> > > (currently running Windows Mail 7 in Vista x64 Build 5456)
    > >> > >
    > >> > > "alex" <> wrote in message
    > >> > > news:...
    > >> > > > hi,
    > >> > > > i recently installed windows vista x86(32 bit) but i was wondering
    > >> > > > if i
    > >> > > > would be able to upgrade it to the 64 bit version, how will i do
    > >> > > > this and
    > >> > > > what benifits are there if i do eg, better graphics? whats the deal
    > >> > > > with
    > >> > > > it?
    > >> > >

    >
    >
    >
    =?Utf-8?B?YWxleA==?=, Jul 19, 2006
    #14
  15. You cannot run Vista x64 unless the processor supports the Intel 64bit
    extensions. I found no reference to the extensions for the M740 on the
    Intel website. What information do you have that your computer is 64bit
    capable?

    "alex" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > when i ran the windows vista upgrade adviser, it said my computer would be
    > able to support the ulitimate version of vista, i even emailed microsoft
    > to
    > ask what the difference between 32bit and 64bit operating sistems before i
    > installed vista. i have them the results from the upgrade adviser and they
    > said to me you would most likley to be able to run 64 bit version,
    > stupidly
    > enough i installed the wrong version of vista but that seems to be ok
    > because
    > it dosnt seem to be able to run 64 bit vista anyway. i mean if you did
    > want
    > to run 64bit operating systems what would you exactly need?
    >
    > "Colin Barnhorst" wrote:
    >
    >> What specs do you have that suggests to you that the M740 is 64bit
    >> capable?
    >> I could find nothing in the Intel matrix to say it is. It does support
    >> Speed Step and DEP but there is no reference to the 64bit extended
    >> instruction set.
    >>
    >> "alex" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >> >
    >> > it's an intel pentium m740, 1.73 ghz.
    >> > "dfeifer" wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> What processor do you have in your box?
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >> "alex" wrote:
    >> >>
    >> >> > yeah because when i tried doing a clean install of windows vista 64
    >> >> > bit
    >> >> > from
    >> >> > boot it said it coulnt read it so i imagine my computer just isnt
    >> >> > compatible
    >> >> > with 64 bit software? even though it does have the right specs...
    >> >> > very
    >> >> > strange, so the verdict for the moment anyway before software and
    >> >> > hardware
    >> >> > manufacturers have a goal to set for them selfs when vista final
    >> >> > edition
    >> >> > comes out, stick with the 32 bit?
    >> >> >
    >> >> > "R. C. White" wrote:
    >> >> >
    >> >> > > Hi, Alex.
    >> >> > >
    >> >> > > First, note that you installed Windows Vista BETA x86. As I'm
    >> >> > > sure
    >> >> > > you
    >> >> > > know, the RTM (Release to Manufacturing) version - often called
    >> >> > > the
    >> >> > > "Gold"
    >> >> > > version - is still several months away. We've been promised that
    >> >> > > we
    >> >> > > will be
    >> >> > > able to upgrade from WinXP to the RTM version of Vista. But
    >> >> > > upgrades
    >> >> > > to -
    >> >> > > and among - the various beta builds are still in the
    >> >> > > try-it-and-see
    >> >> > > phase.
    >> >> > > MS has asked us to try it and report what happens so that they can
    >> >> > > fix any
    >> >> > > problems that we find.
    >> >> > >
    >> >> > > In the meantime, many testers have upgraded from WinXP Pro SP2 x86
    >> >> > > to
    >> >> > > Vista
    >> >> > > Beta 2 x86 (build 5384 and higher). (I tried it and failed
    >> >> > > because
    >> >> > > my
    >> >> > > System Partition is too small, even though I was upgrading on a
    >> >> > > different,
    >> >> > > much larger volume.)
    >> >> > >
    >> >> > > But there cannot be any upgrade path from any x86 operating system
    >> >> > > to
    >> >> > > any
    >> >> > > x64 operating system - or vice versa. The differences between
    >> >> > > 32-bit
    >> >> > > and
    >> >> > > 64-bit drivers are too fundamental for the two systems to be
    >> >> > > compatible.
    >> >> > > Yes, we can run 32-bit applications in Vista x64, and we can run
    >> >> > > 32-bit
    >> >> > > Windows and Vista operating systems on 64-bit hardware, but we
    >> >> > > cannot
    >> >> > > upgrade from one platform to the other. We can only do a clean
    >> >> > > install of
    >> >> > > either from the other.
    >> >> > >
    >> >> > > We cannot even do a clean install of a 64-bit Windows/Vista while
    >> >> > > booted
    >> >> > > into 32-bit Windows/Vista. For example, when I want to clean
    >> >> > > install
    >> >> > > an x64
    >> >> > > version of a Vista beta, I must either boot from the x64 Vista DVD
    >> >> > > or
    >> >> > > boot
    >> >> > > into the x64 version of WinXP and run Vista x64 Setup from there,
    >> >> > > not
    >> >> > > from
    >> >> > > the x86 WinXP.
    >> >> > >
    >> >> > > As to the benefits of 64-bit, I'm sure there will be many soon,
    >> >> > > but
    >> >> > > there
    >> >> > > are not many yet. Hardware makers have been slow to write 64-bit
    >> >> > > drivers
    >> >> > > for their products, but there are many more 64-bit drivers now
    >> >> > > than
    >> >> > > just a
    >> >> > > year ago. Many manufacturers have said, "We'll be ready when
    >> >> > > Vista
    >> >> > > RTM
    >> >> > > arrives, but we are not going to try to hit a moving target during
    >> >> > > the beta
    >> >> > > testing period." Most 32-bit software runs just fine on 64-bit
    >> >> > > hardware and
    >> >> > > in 64-bit versions of WinXP and Vista, so software vendors have
    >> >> > > not
    >> >> > > felt
    >> >> > > much pressure to produce 64-bit versions of their products - yet.
    >> >> > > I'm sure
    >> >> > > they will respond to the market as soon as sufficient demand for
    >> >> > > 64-bit
    >> >> > > software appears.
    >> >> > >
    >> >> > > RC
    >> >> > > --
    >> >> > > R. C. White, CPA [RC]
    >> >> > > San Marcos, TX
    >> >> > >
    >> >> > > Microsoft Windows MVP
    >> >> > > (currently running Windows Mail 7 in Vista x64 Build 5456)
    >> >> > >
    >> >> > > "alex" <> wrote in message
    >> >> > > news:...
    >> >> > > > hi,
    >> >> > > > i recently installed windows vista x86(32 bit) but i was
    >> >> > > > wondering
    >> >> > > > if i
    >> >> > > > would be able to upgrade it to the 64 bit version, how will i do
    >> >> > > > this and
    >> >> > > > what benifits are there if i do eg, better graphics? whats the
    >> >> > > > deal
    >> >> > > > with
    >> >> > > > it?
    >> >> > >

    >>
    >>
    >>
    Colin Barnhorst, Jul 19, 2006
    #15
    1. Advertising

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