Uneven router signal

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by Mike, Apr 19, 2007.

  1. Mike

    Mike Guest

    I am using Network Stumbler to monitor the signal levels of my Netgear router.
    While it is understandable that the level drops every time I position myself between the
    router and my laptop ( average signal value is -58dBm, at a distance of approx. 30
    feet ), I cannot explain why, all conditions being equal, sometimes the level drops down
    by a good 10 o 15 dBm, with sudden dips and then recovers after 10 seconds or so. Again,
    the surrounding environment is the same, no microwave ovens kicking in, only a cordless
    phone which is always on, actually. Looks like the router is misbehaving.
    Any clues ??
    Thanks,

    Mike
     
    Mike, Apr 19, 2007
    #1
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  2. Mike

    Guest

    On 19-Apr-2007, "Mike" <> wrote:

    > I am using Network Stumbler to monitor the signal levels of my Netgear router.
    > While it is understandable that the level drops every time I position myself
    > between the
    > router and my laptop ( average signal value is -58dBm, at a distance of approx. 30
    > feet ), I cannot explain why, all conditions being equal, sometimes the level drops
    > down
    > by a good 10 o 15 dBm, with sudden dips and then recovers after 10 seconds or so.
    > Again,
    > the surrounding environment is the same, no microwave ovens kicking in, only a
    > cordless
    > phone which is always on, actually. Looks like the router is misbehaving.
    > Any clues ??
    > Thanks,


    You don't say what antenna at the PC end. Often with built in antennas
    the PC case can screen the antenna, which is also being subject
    to nearby networks, even if they are on a different channel.
    If these are strong the compete with the desired signal and affect
    the automatic gain control.
    I've found adding a simple foil reflector to my USB wireless adapter,
    and locating it for maximum pickup, helps to reduce fluctuations
    of level.
    By raising gain in one direction you reduce the level of signals
    from rear and side of the direct path, whilst increasing the
    desired signal. Which is of course the purpose of reflectors.
    As a result there can be an improvement of signal quality,
    and a rise in link rate.
    USB wireless adapters on the end of a lead can be
    positioned for best pickup, and most USB adapter utilities
    show signal strength and quality. Signal quality seems
    the most important measure, and signal quality falls
    with multipath propagation.
     
    , Apr 20, 2007
    #2
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  3. Hi
    It is a normal Wireless behavior.
    As to do with the surrounding and stabilization circuits of the Wireless
    transmission.
    2.GHz is the same frequency as the Microwave and has the same qualities,
    i.e. it gets absorbed by water molecules.
    Jack (MVP-Networking).

    "Mike" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I am using Network Stumbler to monitor the signal levels of my Netgear
    >router.
    > While it is understandable that the level drops every time I position
    > myself between the router and my laptop ( average signal value is -58dBm,
    > at a distance of approx. 30 feet ), I cannot explain why, all conditions
    > being equal, sometimes the level drops down by a good 10 o 15 dBm, with
    > sudden dips and then recovers after 10 seconds or so. Again, the
    > surrounding environment is the same, no microwave ovens kicking in, only a
    > cordless phone which is always on, actually. Looks like the router is
    > misbehaving.
    > Any clues ??
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Mike
    >
     
    Jack \(MVP-Networking\)., Apr 20, 2007
    #3
  4. Mike

    Jim Guest

    "Jack (MVP-Networking)." <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    > Hi
    > It is a normal Wireless behavior.
    > As to do with the surrounding and stabilization circuits of the Wireless
    > transmission.
    > 2.GHz is the same frequency as the Microwave and has the same qualities,
    > i.e. it gets absorbed by water molecules.
    > Jack (MVP-Networking).

    I see. That is why my wireless network is so sensitive to humidity.
    Jim
     
    Jim, Apr 20, 2007
    #4
  5. Mike

    Mike Guest

    My laptop has a built-in wireless adapter (Intel PRO 3945ABG), so no external antenna is
    present. There are no nearby networks, at least they are not reported by Network
    Stumbler.
    Shall I buy a USB dongle ? If so, will I have to disable the wireless card ? Is it
    convenient ?
    Thanks,

    Mike
    -------------------------------------------------------------------
    <> wrote in message news:...
    >
    > On 19-Apr-2007, "Mike" <> wrote:
    >
    >> I am using Network Stumbler to monitor the signal levels of my Netgear router.
    >> While it is understandable that the level drops every time I position myself
    >> between the
    >> router and my laptop ( average signal value is -58dBm, at a distance of approx. 30
    >> feet ), I cannot explain why, all conditions being equal, sometimes the level drops
    >> down
    >> by a good 10 o 15 dBm, with sudden dips and then recovers after 10 seconds or so.
    >> Again,
    >> the surrounding environment is the same, no microwave ovens kicking in, only a
    >> cordless
    >> phone which is always on, actually. Looks like the router is misbehaving.
    >> Any clues ??
    >> Thanks,

    >
    > You don't say what antenna at the PC end. Often with built in antennas
    > the PC case can screen the antenna, which is also being subject
    > to nearby networks, even if they are on a different channel.
    > If these are strong the compete with the desired signal and affect
    > the automatic gain control.
    > I've found adding a simple foil reflector to my USB wireless adapter,
    > and locating it for maximum pickup, helps to reduce fluctuations
    > of level.
    > By raising gain in one direction you reduce the level of signals
    > from rear and side of the direct path, whilst increasing the
    > desired signal. Which is of course the purpose of reflectors.
    > As a result there can be an improvement of signal quality,
    > and a rise in link rate.
    > USB wireless adapters on the end of a lead can be
    > positioned for best pickup, and most USB adapter utilities
    > show signal strength and quality. Signal quality seems
    > the most important measure, and signal quality falls
    > with multipath propagation.
     
    Mike, Apr 20, 2007
    #5
  6. Mike

    Guest

    On 20-Apr-2007, "Mike" <> wrote:

    > My laptop has a built-in wireless adapter (Intel PRO 3945ABG), so no external
    > antenna is
    > present. There are no nearby networks, at least they are not reported by Network
    > Stumbler.
    > Shall I buy a USB dongle ? If so, will I have to disable the wireless card ? Is it
    > convenient ?
    > Thanks,


    If it's working stick with what you have got. If it was a PCI card with
    integrated antenna, then it might have been worth pulling the card
    and trying USB.
    Problem with fiddling is that your connection may stop working,
    and you then get into advanced trouble shooting, like is it
    WZC, DHCP, or just an IP address problem? Such as the new
    adapters drivers can't find the router to lease an IP address,
    hence no DNS connection, and it all goes tits up.
    There are also some shiddy USB wireless dongles around,
    I prefer the ZyDas based ones, but they are hard to find,
    and I never got on with D-Link USB wireless adapters.
    So before looking for USB wireless dongles do a bit
    of research, most of the better reviews are in the American
    magazines, who don't seem to be in the pockets of the
    mfrs (advertising revenue) and say it as it is, warts
    and all. But a bit og Googleing should find some info.
     
    , Apr 20, 2007
    #6
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