Understanding TCP/IP

Discussion in 'MCSE' started by =?Utf-8?B?U01D?=, Nov 4, 2004.

  1. On page 2-52 in the Windows Server 2003 Network Infrastructure book the
    question is asking what the configuration error is? The answer is that the
    subnet mask should be /28. Why?

    SC
     
    =?Utf-8?B?U01D?=, Nov 4, 2004
    #1
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  2. =?Utf-8?B?U01D?=

    Guest Guest

    no, well maybe, to be honest im a troll and have no idea
    >-----Original Message-----
    >On page 2-52 in the Windows Server 2003 Network

    Infrastructure book the
    >question is asking what the configuration error is? The

    answer is that the
    >subnet mask should be /28. Why?
    >
    >SC
    >.
    >
     
    Guest, Nov 4, 2004
    #2
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  3. =?Utf-8?B?U01D?=

    Guest Guest

    Its been a while since I've done this but here goes.

    With a 27 bit mask you're borrowing 3 bits from the last
    8 bit octet. That means your rough IP range size is in
    chunks of 32 (as per instruction on page 2-32 Estimating
    Subnet Address Ranges). Giving you the following subnets

    192.168.2.0 - 192.168.2.31
    192.168.2.32 - 192.168.2.63
    ....
    ....
    192.168.2.160 - 192.168.2.191

    Given this, the computers Client A and B and C and D
    would all be in the same subnet (since all of their IP's
    fall in the same range now) this wouldnt work as you need
    to access a router to get to each network segment (in
    todays networks it might work, though that would be due
    to the router using smart features to fix your subnetting
    mistake ..good luck creating overlapping DHCP ranges on
    an MS server).

    Anyway, with a 28 bit mask, you're borrowing 4 bits for
    your subnets (more nets less hosts) so smaller host
    ranges and it would turn out as follows. (4 bits turns
    out to 16 hosts).

    192.168.2.0 - 192.168.2.15
    192.168.2.16 - 192.168.2.31
    ....
    ....
    192.168.2.160 - 192.168.2.175
    192.168.2.176 - 192.168.2.191

    With this scenario your A and B computers (which are in
    the same network, (as the hub is not a routed device) and
    the C and D devices are also on their own network range.
    This allows your communication to happen as it should,
    using the gateway and router to find hosts other side.

    Just my guess though

    -J





    >-----Original Message-----
    >On page 2-52 in the Windows Server 2003 Network

    Infrastructure book the
    >question is asking what the configuration error is? The

    answer is that the
    >subnet mask should be /28. Why?
    >
    >SC
    >.
    >
     
    Guest, Nov 4, 2004
    #3
    1. Advertising

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