unbranded rechargeables

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by urchaidh, Jan 18, 2006.

  1. urchaidh

    urchaidh Guest

    I was looking at batteries for my 350D (NB-2LH). The Canon branded one
    comes in at around 45 quid normally, though I've seen is as cheap as 25
    quid (plus a fiver p&p) on t'internet.

    As an alternative, generic batteries are available starting at around a
    fiver. Has anyone used these, are they reliable and safe? I generally
    don't pay the premium for branded/badged products if there's a good
    (cheaper) alternative, but with almost an oder of magnitude between
    prices here, I am a little suspicious of the quality of the generics.

    (quid == GBP, fiver == GBP 5)
     
    urchaidh, Jan 18, 2006
    #1
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  2. urchaidh

    RustY© Guest

    "urchaidh" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I was looking at batteries for my 350D (NB-2LH).


    I have bought the cheap batteries for my 10D for less than £5 each and they
    have worked great for over two years. Ebay from USA seem cheapest - but you
    will have to pay duty and about £15 customs handling!
     
    RustY©, Jan 18, 2006
    #2
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  3. urchaidh

    Tesco News Guest

    "RustY©" <> wrote in message
    news:0jrzf.295$...
    >
    > "urchaidh" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> I was looking at batteries for my 350D (NB-2LH).

    >
    > I have bought the cheap batteries for my 10D for less than £5 each and
    > they
    > have worked great for over two years. Ebay from USA seem cheapest - but
    > you
    > will have to pay duty and about £15 customs handling!
    >

    Hi.

    Paying £15 Customs handling seems rather to cancel out the benefit of the
    low price.

    I bought a substitute battery for my D70 for £9.99 from 7 Day Shop, no
    Customs levy or VAT. It has a slightly lower rating than the Nikon, but
    works just as well, and seems to last as long as the Nikon brand.

    I can't imagine the Canon substitute Batteries would be much dearer than
    Nikon ones.

    Roy G
     
    Tesco News, Jan 18, 2006
    #3
  4. urchaidh wrote:

    > I was looking at batteries for my 350D (NB-2LH). The Canon branded one
    > comes in at around 45 quid normally, though I've seen is as cheap as 25
    > quid (plus a fiver p&p) on t'internet.
    >
    > As an alternative, generic batteries are available starting at around a
    > fiver. Has anyone used these, are they reliable and safe? I generally
    > don't pay the premium for branded/badged products if there's a good
    > (cheaper) alternative, but with almost an oder of magnitude between
    > prices here, I am a little suspicious of the quality of the generics.
    >
    > (quid == GBP, fiver == GBP 5)


    I got a Uniross branded battery for my Nikon D70 from Photomart
    (www.photomart.co.uk). Think it was about a tenner. No problems with it
    at all but my genuine Nikon battery has been recalled and replaced.

    Ronnie
     
    Ronnie Sellar, Jan 18, 2006
    #4
  5. urchaidh

    SMS Guest

    urchaidh wrote:
    > I was looking at batteries for my 350D (NB-2LH). The Canon branded one
    > comes in at around 45 quid normally, though I've seen is as cheap as 25
    > quid (plus a fiver p&p) on t'internet.
    >
    > As an alternative, generic batteries are available starting at around a
    > fiver. Has anyone used these, are they reliable and safe? I generally
    > don't pay the premium for branded/badged products if there's a good
    > (cheaper) alternative, but with almost an oder of magnitude between
    > prices here, I am a little suspicious of the quality of the generics.


    The aftermarket batteries from reputable retailers are fine. Avoid
    buying on eBay. In the U.S., the best retailer I've found is
    sterlingtek.com. You want a retailer with a high volume, so you know
    that the batteries you buy are not old.

    Steve
    http://batterydata.com
     
    SMS, Jan 18, 2006
    #5
  6. urchaidh

    urchaidh Guest

    SMS wrote:
    > urchaidh wrote:
    > > I was looking at batteries for my 350D (NB-2LH).


    I've done some more digging and there some real cowboys out there.
    First prize goes
    to this lot, who want to sell me NiCd AAs for my 350D:
    http://www.watchbattery.co.uk/shop/Canon_Eos_350D_Digital_Camera_Battery.shtml

    With an honourable mention to this lot who think I want 3.5v:
    http://www.ukdigital.co.uk/accs/eqv_canon_nb2lh_battery.htm

    Confusing to say the least. I think the Uniross NB 2L replacement looks
    like the best trade-off, even if it lower capacity than the NB-2LH.

    > Steve
    > http://batterydata.com


    Very interesting webpage, thanks!
     
    urchaidh, Jan 18, 2006
    #6
  7. urchaidh

    timeOday Guest

    SMS wrote:
    > urchaidh wrote:
    >
    >> I was looking at batteries for my 350D (NB-2LH). The Canon branded one
    >> comes in at around 45 quid normally, though I've seen is as cheap as 25
    >> quid (plus a fiver p&p) on t'internet.
    >>
    >> As an alternative, generic batteries are available starting at around a
    >> fiver. Has anyone used these, are they reliable and safe? I generally
    >> don't pay the premium for branded/badged products if there's a good
    >> (cheaper) alternative, but with almost an oder of magnitude between
    >> prices here, I am a little suspicious of the quality of the generics.

    >
    >
    > The aftermarket batteries from reputable retailers are fine. Avoid
    > buying on eBay. In the U.S., the best retailer I've found is
    > sterlingtek.com.



    My sterlingtek NB-1L clone crapped out in somewhat under a year.
    Fortunately, they replaced it under warranty. In fact, for unknown
    reasons they sent me two batteries to replace the one bad battery. So
    I'm happy, though I hope the replacements last longer.
     
    timeOday, Jan 19, 2006
    #7
  8. urchaidh

    Guest

    urchaidh wrote:
    > I was looking at batteries for my 350D (NB-2LH).


    I am glad of those I bought on www.akkuinternational.de for my 300d,
    for the 350d they're a bit less than a fiver. See
    http://minilien.com/?tUFDqSooKB
    You got to add around 13€ for postage and may be a few quids for the
    cost of bank transfer if you don't pay via PayPal, so I'm not sure it's
    a much better deal than the ones you can buy in UK.

    Greetings from France,
    Nicolas
     
    , Jan 19, 2006
    #8
  9. urchaidh

    Eric Guest

    I bought 3 batteries for my 10D from 7 Day Shop.no probs
    eric
     
    Eric, Jan 19, 2006
    #9
  10. urchaidh

    Mike Guest

    "urchaidh" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I was looking at batteries for my 350D (NB-2LH). The Canon branded one
    > comes in at around 45 quid normally, though I've seen is as cheap as 25
    > quid (plus a fiver p&p) on t'internet.
    >
    > As an alternative, generic batteries are available starting at around a
    > fiver. Has anyone used these, are they reliable and safe? I generally
    > don't pay the premium for branded/badged products if there's a good
    > (cheaper) alternative, but with almost an oder of magnitude between
    > prices here, I am a little suspicious of the quality of the generics.
    >
    > (quid == GBP, fiver == GBP 5)
    >


    If you're talking Li-ion multi-cell packs, then be careful about buying
    unbranded.

    Unbranded packs **probably** have inferior insulation between the cells and
    ***usually*** don't have protective fuses. This means that a drop, or even
    prolonged vibration, could lead to an internal short which starts a fire or
    an explosion.

    There are plenty of recognised brands (Energiser, Uniross, Hannah to name a
    few) which are as safe as the originals and at a fraction of the cost. The
    extra saving for unbranded is just not worth the risk. No need to buy from
    abroad either - plenty of UK suppliers if you do a google.
     
    Mike, Jan 20, 2006
    #10
  11. urchaidh

    SMS Guest

    Mike wrote:

    > Unbranded packs **probably** have inferior insulation between the cells and
    > ***usually*** don't have protective fuses. This means that a drop, or even
    > prolonged vibration, could lead to an internal short which starts a fire or
    > an explosion.
    >
    > There are plenty of recognised brands (Energiser, Uniross, Hannah to name a
    > few) which are as safe as the originals and at a fraction of the cost. The
    > extra saving for unbranded is just not worth the risk. No need to buy from
    > abroad either - plenty of UK suppliers if you do a google.


    I can't speak for all unbranded packs, but I opened an old unbranded
    BP511 that came from Sterlingtek several years ago.

    First of all, on all of the 7.4V packs, they consist of two 3.7V cells
    in series. These cells are each insulated on their own, so both sets of
    insulation would have to break down in order for there to be a short.

    Second, there is much more to a battery pack than the two cells and a
    fuse. There is small printed circuit board with the control and sensing
    circuitry, including sensing each cell individually.

    Third, I found out that the reseller or manufacturer lied about the
    capacity. Inside the "1350 mAH" pack there are two cells marked 1250
    mAH. I'd love to open one of the "1800 mAH" packs that I just bought,
    but since it wrecks the pack when you slice it open, I won't.

    Fourth, branded packs are not immune from fire or explosion. Look at
    some Apple notebooks.
     
    SMS, Jan 20, 2006
    #11
  12. urchaidh

    Mike Guest

    "SMS" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Mike wrote:
    >
    >> Unbranded packs **probably** have inferior insulation between the cells
    >> and ***usually*** don't have protective fuses. This means that a drop, or
    >> even prolonged vibration, could lead to an internal short which starts a
    >> fire or an explosion.
    >>
    >> There are plenty of recognised brands (Energiser, Uniross, Hannah to name
    >> a few) which are as safe as the originals and at a fraction of the cost.
    >> The extra saving for unbranded is just not worth the risk. No need to buy
    >> from abroad either - plenty of UK suppliers if you do a google.

    >
    > I can't speak for all unbranded packs, but I opened an old unbranded BP511
    > that came from Sterlingtek several years ago.
    >
    > First of all, on all of the 7.4V packs, they consist of two 3.7V cells in
    > series. These cells are each insulated on their own, so both sets of
    > insulation would have to break down in order for there to be a short.
    >
    > Second, there is much more to a battery pack than the two cells and a
    > fuse. There is small printed circuit board with the control and sensing
    > circuitry, including sensing each cell individually.
    >
    > Third, I found out that the reseller or manufacturer lied about the
    > capacity. Inside the "1350 mAH" pack there are two cells marked 1250 mAH.
    > I'd love to open one of the "1800 mAH" packs that I just bought, but since
    > it wrecks the pack when you slice it open, I won't.
    >
    > Fourth, branded packs are not immune from fire or explosion. Look at some
    > Apple notebooks.


    The one I took apart had two cells with a poorly soldered uninsulated wire
    link internally. There was no fuse, nor was there a control board.
    The cells were "insulated" with one turn (each) of what looked like
    sellotape and there was no additional protection where the wire link crossed
    between the cells.
    The battery was cheap. I could have put it back together with proper mylar
    tape insulation, but without a fuse it was still an accident waiting to
    happen, so I binned it. The battery was therefore expensive!

    Li-ion batteries pack a high energy density so anything going wrong quickly
    spells trouble.
     
    Mike, Jan 20, 2006
    #12
  13. urchaidh

    SMS Guest

    Mike wrote:
    > "SMS" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Mike wrote:
    >>
    >>> Unbranded packs **probably** have inferior insulation between the cells
    >>> and ***usually*** don't have protective fuses. This means that a drop, or
    >>> even prolonged vibration, could lead to an internal short which starts a
    >>> fire or an explosion.
    >>>
    >>> There are plenty of recognised brands (Energiser, Uniross, Hannah to name
    >>> a few) which are as safe as the originals and at a fraction of the cost.
    >>> The extra saving for unbranded is just not worth the risk. No need to buy
    >>> from abroad either - plenty of UK suppliers if you do a google.

    >> I can't speak for all unbranded packs, but I opened an old unbranded BP511
    >> that came from Sterlingtek several years ago.
    >>
    >> First of all, on all of the 7.4V packs, they consist of two 3.7V cells in
    >> series. These cells are each insulated on their own, so both sets of
    >> insulation would have to break down in order for there to be a short.
    >>
    >> Second, there is much more to a battery pack than the two cells and a
    >> fuse. There is small printed circuit board with the control and sensing
    >> circuitry, including sensing each cell individually.
    >>
    >> Third, I found out that the reseller or manufacturer lied about the
    >> capacity. Inside the "1350 mAH" pack there are two cells marked 1250 mAH.
    >> I'd love to open one of the "1800 mAH" packs that I just bought, but since
    >> it wrecks the pack when you slice it open, I won't.
    >>
    >> Fourth, branded packs are not immune from fire or explosion. Look at some
    >> Apple notebooks.

    >
    > The one I took apart had two cells with a poorly soldered uninsulated wire
    > link internally.


    Which camera was this for?

    > There was no fuse, nor was there a control board.


    The board on this battery has two integrated circuits, nine resistors, 3
    capacitors, and one transistor. The two cells are inside insulating
    material, and the conductor down the middle of the two cells is also
    insulated. The batteries are spot welded to the conductors between them.
    I don't see a fuse, but having dealt with battery-charging circuits in
    my last two jobs, it's likely that the over-current protection is inside
    one to the ICs.

    > The cells were "insulated" with one turn (each) of what looked like
    > sellotape and there was no additional protection where the wire link crossed
    > between the cells.
    > The battery was cheap. I could have put it back together with proper mylar
    > tape insulation, but without a fuse it was still an accident waiting to
    > happen, so I binned it. The battery was therefore expensive!
    >
    > Li-ion batteries pack a high energy density so anything going wrong quickly
    > spells trouble.


    Unfortunately, name brand batteries won't necessarily help you.

    "http://www.nikonusa.com/email_images/nikonusa/service_advisory/battery.html"
     
    SMS, Jan 20, 2006
    #13
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