TV and PC merger

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by - Bobb -, Jun 26, 2010.

  1. - Bobb -

    - Bobb - Guest

    I've been waiting to be able to hook up a PC / disk drive with
    pictures/video on it to watch on TV.
    It seems that that day it just about here, and getting fine tuned, but I'm
    now overwhelmed with ... where is it heading and what is a passing/already
    outdated "fad" and could use some help.

    First let me say, I'm NOT your 'typical guy' who wants a 72" TV in the
    living room hooked up to a $3000 audio system. Not at all. I'm looking for
    merely what I NEED to be able to view PC stuff ( jpeg's mpeg ,
    QuickTime,Windows media formats) on a TV / maybe record a program on a new
    DVR/VHS combo ( so I can copy old tapes to DVD).
    As it is I have a ~3 yr old 27" full screen TV in a bookcase and works
    great, BUT it has only coax and RGB RCA jacks and no connections for newer
    devices ( HDMI etc)
    If I were to go with another TV that 'fits in the space', and has the newer
    jacks since now they are all widescreen, I'm obviously gonna end up with a
    smaller visible screen than I have now ( same width but less height). That's
    why I haven't gotten a new one. But with digital broadcasting I'm now not
    getting all of the cable channels since some only broadcast in digital. So
    , what of these connections is a MUST have ? (from a flexibility
    standpoint - able to hook up different devices) and which are a waste ? (
    HDMI, VGA, USB, SD memory, S-video,etc)

    I looked at a few today and it seems all have HDMI but only some others have
    other connections. None of my current stuff ( receiver, DVD, etc has HDMI so
    a new TV with ONLY HDMI is useless to me. The way the TV's are packaged, ,
    might I have to get the bigger screen TV to get connectors other than HDMI.
    in which case then I'd have to rearrange the living room get new furniture,
    toss the old stuff etc and I REALLY don't want to do that.

    What to get, what to ignore etc and could use some pointers ... places
    online to get educated . Any opinions, ideas ? Thanks
    - Bobb -, Jun 26, 2010
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. - Bobb -

    JD Guest

    On 26/06/2010 3:02 AM, - Bobb - wrote:
    > I've been waiting to be able to hook up a PC / disk drive with
    > pictures/video on it to watch on TV.
    > It seems that that day it just about here, and getting fine tuned, but I'm
    > now overwhelmed with ... where is it heading and what is a passing/already
    > outdated "fad" and could use some help.
    >
    > First let me say, I'm NOT your 'typical guy' who wants a 72" TV in the
    > living room hooked up to a $3000 audio system. Not at all. I'm looking for
    > merely what I NEED to be able to view PC stuff ( jpeg's mpeg ,
    > QuickTime,Windows media formats) on a TV / maybe record a program on a new
    > DVR/VHS combo ( so I can copy old tapes to DVD).
    > As it is I have a ~3 yr old 27" full screen TV in a bookcase and works
    > great, BUT it has only coax and RGB RCA jacks and no connections for newer
    > devices ( HDMI etc)
    > If I were to go with another TV that 'fits in the space', and has the newer
    > jacks since now they are all widescreen, I'm obviously gonna end up with a
    > smaller visible screen than I have now ( same width but less height). That's
    > why I haven't gotten a new one. But with digital broadcasting I'm now not
    > getting all of the cable channels since some only broadcast in digital. So
    > , what of these connections is a MUST have ? (from a flexibility
    > standpoint - able to hook up different devices) and which are a waste ? (
    > HDMI, VGA, USB, SD memory, S-video,etc)
    >
    > I looked at a few today and it seems all have HDMI but only some others have
    > other connections. None of my current stuff ( receiver, DVD, etc has HDMI so
    > a new TV with ONLY HDMI is useless to me. The way the TV's are packaged, ,
    > might I have to get the bigger screen TV to get connectors other than HDMI.
    > in which case then I'd have to rearrange the living room get new furniture,
    > toss the old stuff etc and I REALLY don't want to do that.
    >
    > What to get, what to ignore etc and could use some pointers ... places
    > online to get educated . Any opinions, ideas ? Thanks
    >
    >


    Hi bob

    As far as must have connectors all you really need is HDMI even a cheap
    GFX card like the HD4350 ($29 USD) comes with HDMI,the benefit of doing
    this is that both the video and sound (7.1 sound on the GFX card) are
    sent across the cable and you do not need to use separate speakers this
    way, if you want to use an older GFX card SVGA/D-SUB connectors are a
    must then you ether have to use a separate stereo cable for sound to the
    TV or use PC speakers.

    As far as TV's and sizes go I quite like the Wide screen format as
    opposed to the Old 4:3 format of TV's the usual comparison from a CRT to
    a LCD/Plasma is that you get more screen for the same amount of inches
    as a CRT screen, its just the casing is smaller on a LCD, its all
    personal taste really.

    I use a media centre PC that I built for the TV computer and a wireless
    Keysonic keyboard (like a laptop keyboard with a mouse pad built in)
    running win 7, which is an excellent choice for the MPC as it has media
    centre etc built in, a dual tuner is also fitted for watching/recording
    of TV

    JD
    JD, Jun 26, 2010
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. "- Bobb -" <bobb@noemail.123> wrote in message
    news:i03n47$s60$-september.org...
    > I've been waiting to be able to hook up a PC / disk drive with
    > pictures/video on it to watch on TV.
    > It seems that that day it just about here, and getting fine tuned, but I'm
    > now overwhelmed with ... where is it heading and what is a
    > passing/already outdated "fad" and could use some help.
    >
    > First let me say, I'm NOT your 'typical guy' who wants a 72" TV in the
    > living room hooked up to a $3000 audio system. Not at all. I'm looking for
    > merely what I NEED to be able to view PC stuff ( jpeg's mpeg ,
    > QuickTime,Windows media formats) on a TV / maybe record a program on a new
    > DVR/VHS combo ( so I can copy old tapes to DVD).
    > As it is I have a ~3 yr old 27" full screen TV in a bookcase and works
    > great, BUT it has only coax and RGB RCA jacks and no connections for newer
    > devices ( HDMI etc)
    > If I were to go with another TV that 'fits in the space', and has the
    > newer jacks since now they are all widescreen, I'm obviously gonna end up
    > with a smaller visible screen than I have now ( same width but less
    > height). That's why I haven't gotten a new one. But with digital
    > broadcasting I'm now not getting all of the cable channels since some only
    > broadcast in digital. So , what of these connections is a MUST have ?
    > (from a flexibility standpoint - able to hook up different devices) and
    > which are a waste ? ( HDMI, VGA, USB, SD memory, S-video,etc)
    >
    > I looked at a few today and it seems all have HDMI but only some others
    > have other connections. None of my current stuff ( receiver, DVD, etc has
    > HDMI so a new TV with ONLY HDMI is useless to me. The way the TV's are
    > packaged, , might I have to get the bigger screen TV to get connectors
    > other than HDMI. in which case then I'd have to rearrange the living room
    > get new furniture, toss the old stuff etc and I REALLY don't want to do
    > that.
    >
    > What to get, what to ignore etc and could use some pointers ... places
    > online to get educated . Any opinions, ideas ? Thanks
    >
    >


    You're mixing apples and oranges.

    You have two things going on, the Delivery and the Presentation.

    The delivery covers the stuff line PC-based TV, and Internet TV, which are
    the same thing, by the way. Included in the delivery is cable, fiber, and
    satellite.

    The presentation is the TV itself.

    If you get a new TV today, odds are very high that you must get a flat
    panel, which is a wide screen (16:9) format. If you want to put a flat panel
    into the same space as the existing 4:3 set you have now, then the
    horizontal dimension will drive the maximum vertical dimension. But if you
    wanted to hang your new TV on the wall, you can buy a bracket for about $150
    that has a motorized control that tilts the screen so you are looking at it
    straight on from your spot on the sofa, or your recliner.

    The new TVs are high definition, which is a remarkable improvement in
    picture quality.

    The power consumption is also lower than a comparable sized TV from
    yesteryear. And, if you can do the cost up to an LED-based TV, then the
    power consumption will go down even more. Basically the new sets cost about
    half what it costs for your existing TV to operate, and the LED TV will save
    another 25% or so. And the picture is waaaay better. Way better.

    The digital broadcast vs. the analog broadcast should be a wash because you
    need the digital to analog converter to convert the current digital signals
    to analog. If you plug the cable directly to the TV, then the selection
    should not change and you can get rid of the converter box. If you get
    cable, fiber or satellite, then you still need a Set Top Box that the new TV
    can use, so the selection should not change.

    If you have a converter box now, you won't need it with a Digital TV, but if
    you have cable, fiber optic, or satellite then you will still need the same
    set top box, so you won't see any change from what you have now compared to
    what you'll have with a new TV, except the new TV will have a remarkably
    better picture and lower operating costs.

    All of the TV sets today come with RCA jacks for video and audio, S-Video
    and HDMI. They also have Component Video, which is a video supply that is
    better than RCA but not as good as HDMI. Your cable/fiber/satellite set top
    box will have all three outputs on the back, your DVD should have RCA at a
    minimum, and most of the curent models have HDMI also.

    Do not hesitate to do some serious shopping. I'd suggest a visit to Best Buy
    for no other reason than to see several different samples all showing the
    same picture side by side. You can get a feel for the size and price points
    that best suit your interests. Then shop Costco and WalMart for price on the
    size and brand that you saw at Best Buy. The idea here is to get a relative
    value and quality in a place where the picture and lighting is the same,
    then see if you can beat the price at a store where they sell the same set
    but don't always display them the same. Costco does a pretty good job
    displaying the TVs they have, but Walmart does a generally crappy job of
    this. But if you know the ACME 42-inch is the set for you because it looked
    good at Best Buy, but WalMart sells it for $100 less but doesn't display it
    well, who cares? You know it's a good set because you saw for more money at
    another store, who cares if WalMart doesn't show it well, they sell it at
    the best price, and that's all that matters.

    Personally, I bought a 42" Vizio almost two years ago, and it's a very good
    value for the money. The difference between a $700 Vizio and a $1200 Sony is
    $500, if you ask me. I could not see the difference in picture quality, so I
    bought the cheaper TV. It's worked out very well so far.
    Jeff Strickland, Jun 27, 2010
    #3
  4. - Bobb -

    - Bobb - Guest

    Wow - thanks for all the info Jeff.

    I have been going to Best Buy, and others and did NOT find that:
    "All of the TV sets today come with RCA jacks for video and audio, S-Video
    and HDMI. They also have Component Video, which is a video supply that is
    better than RCA but not as good as HDMI. "

    One thing too - since I last bought a TV - all other electronic chains near
    me have gone out of business.

    and you're right - 2 issues: Delivery and the Presentation. That's why I
    asked here.
    I have a lot of older stuff that has only coax, RCA and most of the current
    "small TVs" only have HDMI for example or 1 HDMI and one USB. I have basic
    cable ( coax) and no real desire to get a $130 per month cable plan / no
    real room for a 42 inch wall mounted .... I just want " a TV" hopefully that
    fits into same space. I agree that proportions mean that at best I will have
    same width and less height ( why I bought what I have just prior to 'all
    widescreens".) and why I haven't yet bought a new TV - it's a downgrade for
    me. But it's really connectivity driving this for me. I don't care for TV
    too much but WOULD like to integrate pictures, video on PC with the TV in
    the living room. So I could watch ... video from ... our trip to Vegas ...
    Europe etc from the MCE PC without having to burn it to DVD. I tried WDTV
    and it worked fine except for QuickTime movies ( last few cameras do MOV
    video). IF WDTV did QT then I'd be fine. I talked to Apple rep ... they
    don't support it either. He told me you just need to convert to H264 first.
    I looked at him and said - "if I wanted to do that I don't need your box. I
    could use the WDTV. You guys wrote QT, you really ought to recommend that
    Apple TV work with it."

    Also without cable, I saw DTV antennas with only coax and if newer TV's
    don't support it ... how to get reception without cable ??
    I'll keep looking
    Thanks for feedback


    "Jeff Strickland" <> wrote in message
    news:i06qas$a8k$-september.org...
    >
    > "- Bobb -" <bobb@noemail.123> wrote in message
    > news:i03n47$s60$-september.org...
    >> I've been waiting to be able to hook up a PC / disk drive with
    >> pictures/video on it to watch on TV.
    >> It seems that that day it just about here, and getting fine tuned, but
    >> I'm now overwhelmed with ... where is it heading and what is a
    >> passing/already outdated "fad" and could use some help.
    >>
    >> First let me say, I'm NOT your 'typical guy' who wants a 72" TV in the
    >> living room hooked up to a $3000 audio system. Not at all. I'm looking
    >> for merely what I NEED to be able to view PC stuff ( jpeg's mpeg ,
    >> QuickTime,Windows media formats) on a TV / maybe record a program on a
    >> new DVR/VHS combo ( so I can copy old tapes to DVD).
    >> As it is I have a ~3 yr old 27" full screen TV in a bookcase and works
    >> great, BUT it has only coax and RGB RCA jacks and no connections for
    >> newer devices ( HDMI etc)
    >> If I were to go with another TV that 'fits in the space', and has the
    >> newer jacks since now they are all widescreen, I'm obviously gonna end
    >> up with a smaller visible screen than I have now ( same width but less
    >> height). That's why I haven't gotten a new one. But with digital
    >> broadcasting I'm now not getting all of the cable channels since some
    >> only broadcast in digital. So , what of these connections is a MUST have
    >> ? (from a flexibility standpoint - able to hook up different devices) and
    >> which are a waste ? ( HDMI, VGA, USB, SD memory, S-video,etc)
    >>
    >> I looked at a few today and it seems all have HDMI but only some others
    >> have other connections. None of my current stuff ( receiver, DVD, etc has
    >> HDMI so a new TV with ONLY HDMI is useless to me. The way the TV's are
    >> packaged, , might I have to get the bigger screen TV to get connectors
    >> other than HDMI. in which case then I'd have to rearrange the living room
    >> get new furniture, toss the old stuff etc and I REALLY don't want to do
    >> that.
    >>
    >> What to get, what to ignore etc and could use some pointers ... places
    >> online to get educated . Any opinions, ideas ? Thanks
    >>
    >>

    >
    > You're mixing apples and oranges.
    >
    > You have two things going on, the Delivery and the Presentation.
    >
    > The delivery covers the stuff line PC-based TV, and Internet TV, which are
    > the same thing, by the way. Included in the delivery is cable, fiber, and
    > satellite.
    >
    > The presentation is the TV itself.
    >
    > If you get a new TV today, odds are very high that you must get a flat
    > panel, which is a wide screen (16:9) format. If you want to put a flat
    > panel into the same space as the existing 4:3 set you have now, then the
    > horizontal dimension will drive the maximum vertical dimension. But if you
    > wanted to hang your new TV on the wall, you can buy a bracket for about
    > $150 that has a motorized control that tilts the screen so you are looking
    > at it straight on from your spot on the sofa, or your recliner.
    >
    > The new TVs are high definition, which is a remarkable improvement in
    > picture quality.
    >
    > The power consumption is also lower than a comparable sized TV from
    > yesteryear. And, if you can do the cost up to an LED-based TV, then the
    > power consumption will go down even more. Basically the new sets cost
    > about half what it costs for your existing TV to operate, and the LED TV
    > will save another 25% or so. And the picture is waaaay better. Way better.
    >
    > The digital broadcast vs. the analog broadcast should be a wash because
    > you need the digital to analog converter to convert the current digital
    > signals to analog. If you plug the cable directly to the TV, then the
    > selection should not change and you can get rid of the converter box. If
    > you get cable, fiber or satellite, then you still need a Set Top Box that
    > the new TV can use, so the selection should not change.
    >
    > If you have a converter box now, you won't need it with a Digital TV, but
    > if you have cable, fiber optic, or satellite then you will still need the
    > same set top box, so you won't see any change from what you have now
    > compared to what you'll have with a new TV, except the new TV will have a
    > remarkably better picture and lower operating costs.
    >
    > All of the TV sets today come with RCA jacks for video and audio, S-Video
    > and HDMI. They also have Component Video, which is a video supply that is
    > better than RCA but not as good as HDMI. Your cable/fiber/satellite set
    > top box will have all three outputs on the back, your DVD should have RCA
    > at a minimum, and most of the curent models have HDMI also.
    >
    > Do not hesitate to do some serious shopping. I'd suggest a visit to Best
    > Buy for no other reason than to see several different samples all showing
    > the same picture side by side. You can get a feel for the size and price
    > points that best suit your interests. Then shop Costco and WalMart for
    > price on the size and brand that you saw at Best Buy. The idea here is to
    > get a relative value and quality in a place where the picture and lighting
    > is the same, then see if you can beat the price at a store where they sell
    > the same set but don't always display them the same. Costco does a pretty
    > good job displaying the TVs they have, but Walmart does a generally crappy
    > job of this. But if you know the ACME 42-inch is the set for you because
    > it looked good at Best Buy, but WalMart sells it for $100 less but doesn't
    > display it well, who cares? You know it's a good set because you saw for
    > more money at another store, who cares if WalMart doesn't show it well,
    > they sell it at the best price, and that's all that matters.
    >
    > Personally, I bought a 42" Vizio almost two years ago, and it's a very
    > good value for the money. The difference between a $700 Vizio and a $1200
    > Sony is $500, if you ask me. I could not see the difference in picture
    > quality, so I bought the cheaper TV. It's worked out very well so far.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    - Bobb -, Jun 27, 2010
    #4
  5. "- Bobb -" <bobb@noemail.123> wrote in message
    news:i07rr3$19o$-september.org...
    > Wow - thanks for all the info Jeff.
    >
    > I have been going to Best Buy, and others and did NOT find that:
    > "All of the TV sets today come with RCA jacks for video and audio, S-Video
    > and HDMI. They also have Component Video, which is a video supply that is
    > better than RCA but not as good as HDMI. "
    >
    > One thing too - since I last bought a TV - all other electronic chains
    > near me have gone out of business.
    >
    > and you're right - 2 issues: Delivery and the Presentation. That's why I
    > asked here.
    > I have a lot of older stuff that has only coax, RCA and most of the
    > current "small TVs" only have HDMI for example or 1 HDMI and one USB. I
    > have basic cable ( coax) and no real desire to get a $130 per month cable
    > plan / no real room for a 42 inch wall mounted .... I just want " a TV"
    > hopefully that fits into same space. I agree that proportions mean that at
    > best I will have same width and less height ( why I bought what I have
    > just prior to 'all widescreens".) and why I haven't yet bought a new TV -
    > it's a downgrade for me. But it's really connectivity driving this for me.
    > I don't care for TV too much but WOULD like to integrate pictures, video
    > on PC with the TV in the living room. So I could watch ... video from ...
    > our trip to Vegas ... Europe etc from the MCE PC without having to burn it
    > to DVD. I tried WDTV and it worked fine except for QuickTime movies ( last
    > few cameras do MOV video). IF WDTV did QT then I'd be fine. I talked to
    > Apple rep ... they don't support it either. He told me you just need to
    > convert to H264 first. I looked at him and said - "if I wanted to do that
    > I don't need your box. I could use the WDTV. You guys wrote QT, you really
    > ought to recommend that Apple TV work with it."
    >
    > Also without cable, I saw DTV antennas with only coax and if newer TV's
    > don't support it ... how to get reception without cable ??
    > I'll keep looking
    > Thanks for feedback
    >
    >


    I've never seen a TV set that does not have a coax connector. I've not seen
    a flat panel that does not have at least RCA, and most have HDMI, S-Video,
    and Component along with the coax. Coax is the primary means of bringing TV
    to most homes in America, so a TV without coax is counter intuitive. I would
    not say that there is no such thing, but as long as broadcasting is
    delivered by cable, TVs will have a coax connector on the back or a huge
    percentage of the market place will be excluded from buying the set that
    lacks coax. If you're finding a set without coax, you should look to see if
    it also lacks a tuner. All TV tuners available today are digital, so they
    don't need the converter box, you simply plug your digital antenna lead into
    the back. All TV sets don't have a tuner though, and these would not have a
    coax connector because they can't do anything with the information that's
    delivered in that format.

    You _might_ find a few sets that have limited connections, but you should be
    able to find any combination of connections on any size TV set. If there is
    one that hasn't got the connection combination you want, then you have to
    check that one off of your list and select another model. Higher priced
    units might have more connections than the cheaper sets, but the comparison
    has to be held to the same size.

    If you want a 42" TV, then you compare the price and features of the other
    42" TVs, lower priced uints wold reasonably have fewer options for
    connecting different things, but the basics of all flat panels that I've
    seen are a coax, an HDMI, or two, if the TV is rated as High Definition, two
    sets of auxiliary connections (RCA). Most have Component Video, and lots of
    them have S-Video. Frankly, I've never connected or used any component that
    makes use of S-Video, and my instinct is that this format didn't take off
    very well. I could be wrong, but I don't think S-Video is used by very many
    people, and I suspect it is the least used connection. I have no specific
    data to support my thesis. Picture quality for an HDTV in the range of
    basic, good, better, best is coax, RCA, Component, HDMI. Game console inputs
    are typically RCA which are called Auxiliary inputs, and most sets today
    have Aux1 and Aux2. Component inputs are also available in multiples.
    Jeff Strickland, Jun 27, 2010
    #5
  6. - Bobb -

    UCLAN Guest

    - Bobb - wrote:

    > I have a lot of older stuff that has only coax, RCA and most of the current
    > "small TVs" only have HDMI for example or 1 HDMI and one USB. I have basic
    > cable ( coax) and no real desire to get a $130 per month cable plan / no
    > real room for a 42 inch wall mounted .... I just want " a TV" hopefully that
    > fits into same space. I agree that proportions mean that at best I will have
    > same width and less height ( why I bought what I have just prior to 'all
    > widescreens".) and why I haven't yet bought a new TV - it's a downgrade for
    > me.


    Two points to consider.

    1) Today's flat screen LCD sets generally have a much narrower bezel than the
    analog 4:3 CRT TVs did. I have a cabinet in my den that has a 26" wide area
    for a TV. The biggest analog 4:3 CRT I could find that would fit was a 24"
    diagonal Sony WEGA. Total set width was just a hair under 26". I replaced
    it a couple of years ago with a 26" diagonal Sony Bravia LCD, which also
    measured a hair under 26" wide. I have a 3.5" wider picture (22.7 versus
    19.2") in the same cabinet.

    2) Even with NO cable box (incoming cable plugged directly into the TV), you
    will get many "ClearQAM" digital channels, most in HD. Yes, you CAN have
    HDTV with basic cable with NO added cost. Perfectly legal. Google "Clear
    QAM."
    UCLAN, Jun 27, 2010
    #6
  7. - Bobb -

    - Bobb - Guest

    "Jeff Strickland" <> wrote in message
    news:i083eh$4iv$-september.org...
    >
    > "- Bobb -" <bobb@noemail.123> wrote in message
    > news:i07rr3$19o$-september.org...
    >> Wow - thanks for all the info Jeff.
    >>
    >> I have been going to Best Buy, and others and did NOT find that:
    >> "All of the TV sets today come with RCA jacks for video and audio,
    >> S-Video
    >> and HDMI. They also have Component Video, which is a video supply that is
    >> better than RCA but not as good as HDMI. "

    << snipped>>
    >> Also without cable, I saw DTV antennas with only coax and if newer TV's
    >> don't support it ... how to get reception without cable ??
    >> I'll keep looking
    >> Thanks for feedback
    >>
    >>

    >
    > I've never seen a TV set that does not have a coax connector.

    --------------------
    Here's an example of what I'm finding:
    Samsung - 26" Class / 720p / 60Hz / LCD HDTV
    http://www.bestbuy.com/site/Samsung...HDTV/9770706.p?id=1218170912003&skuId=9770706

    See no coax listed
    a.. Internet Connectable No
    a.. PC Inputs 1
    a.. USB Port Yes
    a.. Media Card Slot No
    a.. HDMI Inputs 2
    a.. DVI Inputs 0
    a.. Component Video Inputs 0
    a.. Composite Inputs 0

    MOST list only HDMI and /or USB. I thought Ok - maybe it's assumed and they
    all have it.
    I went onsite and turned a few around - no coax.

    Others DID have coax ( RF) jack like
    SKU: 9559881
    Inputs
    Include 2 composite (1 rear, 1 side), 1 S-video, 2 HDMI (1 rear, 1 side), 1
    component video (rear), 1 PC (rear), 1 PC audio (rear) and RF (rear).

    I'm thinking that I'd like:

    RF, USB /SD slot, RCA composites and probably HDMI ( for future DVD /DVR
    use)
    I saw BestBuy SKU: 9791632 online, but customer reviews show several people
    with multiple issues. Of course the bad reviews always get posted and people
    without a problem don't think to provide feedback.

    --------------------
    > I've not seen a flat panel that does not have at least RCA,
    > and most have HDMI, S-Video, and Component along with the coax. Coax is
    > the primary means of bringing TV to most homes in
    > America, so a TV without coax is counter intuitive. I would not say that
    > there is no such thing, but as long as broadcasting is delivered by cable,
    > TVs will have a coax connector on the back or a huge percentage of the
    > market place will be excluded from buying the set that lacks coax. If
    > you're finding a set without coax, you should look to see if it also lacks
    > a tuner. All TV tuners available today are digital, so they don't need the
    > converter box, you simply plug your digital antenna lead into the back.
    > All TV sets don't have a tuner though, and these would not have a coax
    > connector because they can't do anything with the information that's
    > delivered in that format.


    That's what I found on some of them - after getting there to look at them.
    That how my confusion started. I would say that a " TV" without a tuner is
    NOT a TV - it's a monitor.But they advertise them as HDTV's (since most
    people have cable boxes with HDMI ?? ). Semantics I know but for someone
    that just wants a TV it's been aggravating

    On some Toshiba's I see I could use a HDMI-to-DVI adapter cable to go from a
    DVI PC to the TV as output device and thinking that will work OK
    Thanks again ... I'll keep shopping.
    - Bobb -, Jun 27, 2010
    #7
  8. - Bobb -

    - Bobb - Guest

    I think I might have found a good candidate:
    Samsung UN22C4000
    I had dismissed it previously because when I checked, online info showed
    30.5 wide. I did another search for .. my variables and it came up again and
    this time I noticed - it's a 22" diagonal screen - it can't be 30.5 " wide
    as listed at ... compUSA, TigerDirect, Best Buy etc. Went to Samsung -
    listed incorretly there too, and I'm sure the source for bad retailer's
    info, but in owners manual at Samsung it shows as 21.5 wide - makes more
    sense. Bingo - fits in the spot I have.
    And it has most of what I'm looking for, so willl check it out tomorrow.
    Thanks folks. I'll let you know how it goes.
    - Bobb -, Jun 28, 2010
    #8
  9. - Bobb -

    UCLAN Guest

    - Bobb - wrote:

    >>I've never seen a TV set that does not have a coax connector.

    >
    > --------------------
    > Here's an example of what I'm finding:
    > Samsung - 26" Class / 720p / 60Hz / LCD HDTV
    > http://www.bestbuy.com/site/Samsung...HDTV/9770706.p?id=1218170912003&skuId=9770706
    >
    > See no coax listed
    > a.. Internet Connectable No
    > a.. PC Inputs 1
    > a.. USB Port Yes
    > a.. Media Card Slot No
    > a.. HDMI Inputs 2
    > a.. DVI Inputs 0
    > a.. Component Video Inputs 0
    > a.. Composite Inputs 0


    The above is not correct according to Samsung's website. The site lists one
    set of composite and one set of component inputs.

    http://www.samsung.com/us/consumer/...D1DXZA/index.idx?pagetype=prd_detail&tab=spec
    [ http://tinyurl.com/2agwmpy ]

    Also, as the drawing on Page 7 of the manual shows, it clearly has an RF input
    (and output.)

    http://downloadcenter.samsung.com/content/UM/201002/20100220124809187/BN68-02620A-02Eng_0211.pdf

    Check out the manual. Don't rely on Bestbuy's website.
    UCLAN, Jun 28, 2010
    #9
  10. - Bobb -

    UCLAN Guest

    - Bobb - wrote:

    > I think I might have found a good candidate:
    > Samsung UN22C4000
    > I had dismissed it previously because when I checked, online info showed
    > 30.5 wide. I did another search for .. my variables and it came up again and
    > this time I noticed - it's a 22" diagonal screen - it can't be 30.5 " wide
    > as listed at ... compUSA, TigerDirect, Best Buy etc. Went to Samsung -
    > listed incorretly there too,


    Sigh...

    On the SPECIFICATIONS page for this product at the Samsung site, it clearly
    states:

    Product Dimensions (WxHxD) - 21.5" x 16.2” x 7.5"
    (with stand)

    Product Dimensions (WxHxD) - 21.5" x 14.1” x 1.2"
    (without stand)

    http://www.samsung.com/us/consumer/...0PDXZA/index.idx?pagetype=prd_detail&tab=spec
    UCLAN, Jun 28, 2010
    #10
  11. - Bobb -

    - Bobb - Guest

    "UCLAN" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >- Bobb - wrote:
    >
    >> I think I might have found a good candidate:
    >> Samsung UN22C4000
    >> I had dismissed it previously because when I checked, online info showed
    >> 30.5 wide. I did another search for .. my variables and it came up again
    >> and this time I noticed - it's a 22" diagonal screen - it can't be 30.5 "
    >> wide as listed at ... compUSA, TigerDirect, Best Buy etc. Went to
    >> Samsung - listed incorretly there too,

    >
    > Sigh...
    >
    > On the SPECIFICATIONS page for this product at the Samsung site, it
    > clearly
    > states:
    >
    > Product Dimensions (WxHxD) - 21.5" x 16.2” x 7.5"
    > (with stand)
    >
    > Product Dimensions (WxHxD) - 21.5" x 14.1” x 1.2"
    > (without stand)
    >
    > http://www.samsung.com/us/consumer/...0PDXZA/index.idx?pagetype=prd_detail&tab=spec


    True - that's where I saw it. But look at the picture as you open that link
    The TV dimensions are written above and beside the TV : 30.5 wide , and
    that's what all retailers listed as the size online , like
    http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=5713617&CatId=3816
    Target , Best Buy, others same thing etc
    Anyways I'll check it out tonight
    Thanks
    - Bobb -, Jun 28, 2010
    #11
  12. - Bobb -

    - Bobb - Guest

    "UCLAN" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >- Bobb - wrote:
    >
    >>>I've never seen a TV set that does not have a coax connector.

    >>
    >> --------------------
    >> Here's an example of what I'm finding:
    >> Samsung - 26" Class / 720p / 60Hz / LCD HDTV
    >> http://www.bestbuy.com/site/Samsung...HDTV/9770706.p?id=1218170912003&skuId=9770706
    >>
    >> See no coax listed
    >> a.. Internet Connectable No
    >> a.. PC Inputs 1
    >> a.. USB Port Yes
    >> a.. Media Card Slot No
    >> a.. HDMI Inputs 2
    >> a.. DVI Inputs 0
    >> a.. Component Video Inputs 0
    >> a.. Composite Inputs 0

    >
    > The above is not correct according to Samsung's website. The site lists
    > one
    > set of composite and one set of component inputs.
    >
    > http://www.samsung.com/us/consumer/...D1DXZA/index.idx?pagetype=prd_detail&tab=spec
    > [ http://tinyurl.com/2agwmpy ]
    >
    > Also, as the drawing on Page 7 of the manual shows, it clearly has an RF
    > input
    > (and output.)
    >
    > http://downloadcenter.samsung.com/content/UM/201002/20100220124809187/BN68-02620A-02Eng_0211.pdf
    >
    > Check out the manual. Don't rely on Bestbuy's website.


    Exactly, once you open the manual, but when I started I didn't have an exact
    model. My point was - to "shop" online, to get candidates and then narrow
    down was very useless with that info being wrong at retailer's site.
    - Bobb -, Jun 28, 2010
    #12
  13. - Bobb -

    UCLAN Guest

    - Bobb - wrote:

    >>On the SPECIFICATIONS page for this product at the Samsung site, it
    >>clearly
    >>states:
    >>
    >>Product Dimensions (WxHxD) - 21.5" x 16.2” x 7.5"
    >>(with stand)
    >>
    >>Product Dimensions (WxHxD) - 21.5" x 14.1” x 1.2"
    >>(without stand)
    >>
    >>http://www.samsung.com/us/consumer/...0PDXZA/index.idx?pagetype=prd_detail&tab=spec

    >
    > True - that's where I saw it. But look at the picture as you open that link
    > The TV dimensions are written above and beside the TV : 30.5 wide , and
    > that's what all retailers listed as the size online , like
    > http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=5713617&CatId=3816
    > Target , Best Buy, others same thing etc


    If your thinking of a 22" set, consider the Sony 22BX300. Excellent TV.

    http://www.sonystyle.com/webapp/wcs...gId=-1&productId=8198552921666076677#features
    UCLAN, Jun 28, 2010
    #13
  14. - Bobb -

    - Bobb - Guest

    "UCLAN" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >- Bobb - wrote: <snipped> If you're thinking of a 22" set, consider the
    >Sony 22BX300. Excellent TV.
    >
    > http://www.sonystyle.com/webapp/wcs...gId=-1&productId=8198552921666076677#features


    Thanks I'll check it out when I return. I DID stop at Target and Best Buy.
    As I expected, Target was a waste of my time. ( I wonder how it stays open)
    TV's for sale, but no help - no info on the tag other than the size,price.
    ONE I could turn enough to see what connections existed on the back but all
    of the others the "security loop" was so tight I couldn't pivot them at all.
    At Best Buy I saw that the 26" Samsung and LG LED TV's would fit. Both had
    similar connections.
    LG had 2,000,000 to 1 ratio , Samsung 3m to 1. both about $500.
    I'll do some homework to compare reviews / prices.
    I then looked at DVR / VCR combo's . ( I wanted to see what the connections
    would be on new DVR/VCR to see what I'd need on the new TV.) There were 6 of
    them and other than size and price , no info on the tags. I DID open one box
    and for a Panasonic, the tuner was analog only, I asked sales help. they
    knew nothing about them. Last guy said "We have NO info. Sorry, but no one
    ever buys them". I wonder why ?
    - Bobb -, Jun 28, 2010
    #14
  15. "- Bobb -" <bobb@noemail.123> wrote in message
    news:i08k4t$fvs$-september.org...
    >
    > "Jeff Strickland" <> wrote in message
    > news:i083eh$4iv$-september.org...
    >>
    >> "- Bobb -" <bobb@noemail.123> wrote in message
    >> news:i07rr3$19o$-september.org...
    >>> Wow - thanks for all the info Jeff.
    >>>
    >>> I have been going to Best Buy, and others and did NOT find that:
    >>> "All of the TV sets today come with RCA jacks for video and audio,
    >>> S-Video
    >>> and HDMI. They also have Component Video, which is a video supply that
    >>> is
    >>> better than RCA but not as good as HDMI. "

    > << snipped>>
    >>> Also without cable, I saw DTV antennas with only coax and if newer TV's
    >>> don't support it ... how to get reception without cable ??
    >>> I'll keep looking
    >>> Thanks for feedback
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> I've never seen a TV set that does not have a coax connector.

    > --------------------
    > Here's an example of what I'm finding:
    > Samsung - 26" Class / 720p / 60Hz / LCD HDTV
    > http://www.bestbuy.com/site/Samsung...HDTV/9770706.p?id=1218170912003&skuId=9770706
    >
    > See no coax listed


    Spin the photo to look at the back and zoom to 200%, the coax connection is
    to the left of the block where all of the other connections are.





    > a.. Internet Connectable No
    > a.. PC Inputs 1
    > a.. USB Port Yes
    > a.. Media Card Slot No
    > a.. HDMI Inputs 2
    > a.. DVI Inputs 0
    > a.. Component Video Inputs 0
    > a.. Composite Inputs 0
    >
    > MOST list only HDMI and /or USB. I thought Ok - maybe it's assumed and
    > they all have it.
    > I went onsite and turned a few around - no coax.
    >
    > Others DID have coax ( RF) jack like
    > SKU: 9559881
    > Inputs
    > Include 2 composite (1 rear, 1 side), 1 S-video, 2 HDMI (1 rear, 1 side),
    > 1 component video (rear), 1 PC (rear), 1 PC audio (rear) and RF (rear).
    >
    > I'm thinking that I'd like:
    >
    > RF, USB /SD slot, RCA composites and probably HDMI ( for future DVD /DVR
    > use)
    > I saw BestBuy SKU: 9791632 online, but customer reviews show several
    > people with multiple issues. Of course the bad reviews always get posted
    > and people without a problem don't think to provide feedback.
    >


    I'd like to invite you to get out of the house for a few hours and go put
    your fingers on some TV sets and get the whole touchy feely experience that
    you can't get from shopping online. You said you were price conscious, but
    you list features taht are pretty high end while I'm trying to say that the
    cheaper units will have your basic needs

    You can't possibly buy a TV set without touching it. Once you touch the one
    you want, go home and shop online, or take your Blackberry with you and go
    online in the food court.

    AND, you gave me a link to a 720p, 60Hz set that is cheap but not nearly as
    good oof a viewing experience as a 1080p, or 1080i, that clocks at 120Hz or
    240 Hz. The link you gave does not begin to have the features you want.




    > --------------------
    >> I've not seen a flat panel that does not have at least RCA,
    >> and most have HDMI, S-Video, and Component along with the coax. Coax is
    >> the primary means of bringing TV to most homes in
    >> America, so a TV without coax is counter intuitive. I would not say that
    >> there is no such thing, but as long as broadcasting is delivered by
    >> cable, TVs will have a coax connector on the back or a huge percentage of
    >> the market place will be excluded from buying the set that lacks coax. If
    >> you're finding a set without coax, you should look to see if it also
    >> lacks a tuner. All TV tuners available today are digital, so they don't
    >> need the converter box, you simply plug your digital antenna lead into
    >> the back. All TV sets don't have a tuner though, and these would not have
    >> a coax connector because they can't do anything with the information
    >> that's delivered in that format.

    >
    > That's what I found on some of them - after getting there to look at them.
    > That how my confusion started. I would say that a " TV" without a tuner
    > is NOT a TV - it's a monitor.But they advertise them as HDTV's (since most
    > people have cable boxes with HDMI ?? ). Semantics I know but for someone
    > that just wants a TV it's been aggravating


    You're right, technically, a TV without a tuner should be sold as a monitor.
    The problem with that is that a television monitor and a computer monitor
    are not the same thing, so the term "monitor," becomes a source of
    confusion.

    But any TV set with a tuner will have a coax connector because that's the
    primary way of getting a TV signal to the set. If the TV signal comes into
    an intermediate box -- set top box for cable, satellite, fios, whatever --
    then that box will interface with the TV via a coax, RCA, or HDMI. There are
    a few other schemes for making high def connections, and some boxes support
    them and some do not. But any television set with a tuner will have at a
    minimum a coax connector on the back.




    >
    > On some Toshiba's I see I could use a HDMI-to-DVI adapter cable to go from
    > a DVI PC to the TV as output device and thinking that will work OK
    > Thanks again ... I'll keep shopping.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    Jeff Strickland, Jun 28, 2010
    #15
  16. - Bobb -

    Colin Trunt Guest

    "- Bobb -" <bobb@noemail.123> wrote in message
    news:i03n47$s60$-september.org...
    > I've been waiting to be able to hook up a PC / disk drive with
    > pictures/video on it to watch on TV.
    > It seems that that day it just about here, and getting fine tuned, but I'm
    > now overwhelmed with ... where is it heading and what is a
    > passing/already outdated "fad" and could use some help.
    >
    > First let me say, I'm NOT your 'typical guy' who wants a 72" TV in the
    > living room hooked up to a $3000 audio system. Not at all. I'm looking for
    > merely what I NEED to be able to view PC stuff ( jpeg's mpeg ,
    > QuickTime,Windows media formats) on a TV / maybe record a program on a new
    > DVR/VHS combo ( so I can copy old tapes to DVD).
    > As it is I have a ~3 yr old 27" full screen TV in a bookcase and works
    > great, BUT it has only coax and RGB RCA jacks and no connections for newer
    > devices ( HDMI etc)
    > If I were to go with another TV that 'fits in the space', and has the
    > newer jacks since now they are all widescreen, I'm obviously gonna end up
    > with a smaller visible screen than I have now ( same width but less
    > height). That's why I haven't gotten a new one. But with digital
    > broadcasting I'm now not getting all of the cable channels since some only
    > broadcast in digital. So , what of these connections is a MUST have ?
    > (from a flexibility standpoint - able to hook up different devices) and
    > which are a waste ? ( HDMI, VGA, USB, SD memory, S-video,etc)
    >
    > I looked at a few today and it seems all have HDMI but only some others
    > have other connections. None of my current stuff ( receiver, DVD, etc has
    > HDMI so a new TV with ONLY HDMI is useless to me. The way the TV's are
    > packaged, , might I have to get the bigger screen TV to get connectors
    > other than HDMI. in which case then I'd have to rearrange the living room
    > get new furniture, toss the old stuff etc and I REALLY don't want to do
    > that.
    >
    > What to get, what to ignore etc and could use some pointers ... places
    > online to get educated . Any opinions, ideas ? Thanks



    Hi, I'm in the UK so things are a bit different over here.
    I got a new TV recently, it has 3 or 4 hdmi, a scart socker,
    a 9 pin monitor socket and a few otheres (RCA), USB.

    That's a fairly standard set-up, you really should have all of those,
    most TV's will have all so check, there are loads of models available.


    My parents had the same problem, they had a TV cabinet already so they could
    only get a 28" widescreen in it, (32" was too wide). It's looks OK though,
    it's personal preference really.
    You can see some huge TV's in the showrooms, I settled for a 32" one, it
    looked small compared to the others in the showroom but pretty big when I
    got it
    back home (especialy as I had been watching on a 14" portable for a while
    as my main TV had broken and I too had to work out what to buy).

    That acually was the second one I bought because the first one broke, after
    a while
    using a HDMI socket it developed noise on the screen so I switched to
    another socket
    (HDMI) but that too developed the same problem, I was on the third of four
    sockets
    when when I was pluging the hdmi in with my hand on the screen the screen
    went!!
    So I am not sure if the TV had a fault or if HDMI sockets are rather
    delicate.

    I don't use the hdmi on the new TV just the coax, it has a built in digital
    receiver so
    no problems there so I guess you will be able to do the same?

    Anyway I guuuueess you have bough by now so a bit of a waste me posting -
    lol


    >
    >
    Colin Trunt, Jul 9, 2010
    #16
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