Trying to Install 16 bit Program into XP Pro

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Luke O'Malley, Oct 8, 2004.

  1. Hi,

    I tried to install a music notation program, Encore. I received a
    msg

    "16 bit Windows Subsystem"
    C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32\AUTOEXEC.NT. The system file is not suitable
    for running MS-DOS and Microsoft Windows applications. Choose
    'Close' to terminate the application.l

    I traced the problem down to Microsoft and found the following:

    RESOLUTION
    To resolve this issue:
    Insert the CD into the CD drive or DVD drive.
    Click Start, and then click Run.
    In the Open box, type cmd, and then click OK.
    At the command prompt, type the following commands, pressing ENTER
    after each command:


    expand CD-ROM Drive Letter:\i386\config.nt_
    c:\windows\system32\config.nt
    expand CD-ROM Drive Letter:\i386\autoexec.nt_
    c:\windows\system32\autoexec.nt
    expand CD-ROM Drive Letter:\i386\command.co_
    c:\windows\system32\command.com
    exit

    Start or install the program. If the issue is resolved, do not
    complete the remaining steps. If the issue is not resolved, go to
    the next step.
    Note: The Command.com file is not edited or created in this in the
    following process. Because of this, you may have to expand it from
    your Windows XP CD-ROM.

    Start Notepad.
    In Notepad, type the following entries: dos=high, umb
    device=%SYSTEMROOT%\system32\himem.sys
    files=40
    On the File menu, click Save As.
    In the File Name box, type Config.nt, and then click Save. Close the
    Config.nt file.
    On the File menu, click New.
    In the new blank document, type the following entries: @echo off
    lh %SYSTEMROOT%\system32\mscdexnt.exe
    lh %SYSTEMROOT%\system32\redir
    lh %SYSTEMROOT%\system32\dosx
    SET BLASTER=A220 I5 D1 P330 T3
    On the File menu, click Save As.
    In the File Name box, type Autoexec.nt, and then click Save. Close
    the Autoexec.nt file.
    Start Windows Explorer. Locate the Config.nt file, right-click the
    Config.nt file, and then click Copy.

    Everything was fine until I got here. I cannot find the
    %SYSTEMROOT%\System 32 folder. Can anyone help?

    Right-click the %SYSTEMROOT%\System32 folder, and then click Paste.
    Locate the Autoexec.nt file, right-click the Autoexec.nt file, and
    then click Copy.
    Right-click the %SYSTEMROOT%\System32 folder, and then click Paste.
    Locate the Command.com file, right-click the expanded Command.com
    file, and then click Copy.
    Right-click the %SYSTEMROOT%\System32 folder, and then click Paste.
    Restart your computer.

    Sorry for all the text, but it was the only way I knew to make my
    postion clear besides just asking where the %SYSTERMROOT%/System32
    folder is located.

    Goodwill,
    Luke
     
    Luke O'Malley, Oct 8, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Luke O'Malley

    Duane Arnold Guest

    Luke O'Malley <> wrote in news:ORB9d.25458
    $:

    > Hi,
    >
    > I tried to install a music notation program, Encore. I received a
    > msg
    >
    > "16 bit Windows Subsystem"
    > C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32\AUTOEXEC.NT. The system file is not suitable
    > for running MS-DOS and Microsoft Windows applications. Choose
    > 'Close' to terminate the application.l
    >
    > I traced the problem down to Microsoft and found the following:
    >
    > RESOLUTION
    > To resolve this issue:
    > Insert the CD into the CD drive or DVD drive.
    > Click Start, and then click Run.
    > In the Open box, type cmd, and then click OK.
    > At the command prompt, type the following commands, pressing ENTER
    > after each command:
    >
    >
    > expand CD-ROM Drive Letter:\i386\config.nt_
    > c:\windows\system32\config.nt
    > expand CD-ROM Drive Letter:\i386\autoexec.nt_
    > c:\windows\system32\autoexec.nt
    > expand CD-ROM Drive Letter:\i386\command.co_
    > c:\windows\system32\command.com
    > exit
    >
    > Start or install the program. If the issue is resolved, do not
    > complete the remaining steps. If the issue is not resolved, go to
    > the next step.
    > Note: The Command.com file is not edited or created in this in the
    > following process. Because of this, you may have to expand it from
    > your Windows XP CD-ROM.
    >
    > Start Notepad.
    > In Notepad, type the following entries: dos=high, umb
    > device=%SYSTEMROOT%\system32\himem.sys
    > files=40
    > On the File menu, click Save As.
    > In the File Name box, type Config.nt, and then click Save. Close the
    > Config.nt file.
    > On the File menu, click New.
    > In the new blank document, type the following entries: @echo off
    > lh %SYSTEMROOT%\system32\mscdexnt.exe
    > lh %SYSTEMROOT%\system32\redir
    > lh %SYSTEMROOT%\system32\dosx
    > SET BLASTER=A220 I5 D1 P330 T3
    > On the File menu, click Save As.
    > In the File Name box, type Autoexec.nt, and then click Save. Close
    > the Autoexec.nt file.
    > Start Windows Explorer. Locate the Config.nt file, right-click the
    > Config.nt file, and then click Copy.
    >
    > Everything was fine until I got here. I cannot find the
    > %SYSTEMROOT%\System 32 folder. Can anyone help?


    c:\Windows\system32

    Duane :)
     
    Duane Arnold, Oct 8, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. In article Xns957CA88558B86notmenotmecom@216.148.227.77,
    Duane Arnold <> said:
    >
    >Luke O'Malley <> wrote in news:ORB9d.25458
    >$:
    >
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> I tried to install a music notation program, Encore. I received a
    >> msg
    >>
    >> "16 bit Windows Subsystem"
    >> C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32\AUTOEXEC.NT. The system file is not suitable
    >> for running MS-DOS and Microsoft Windows applications. Choose
    >> 'Close' to terminate the application.l
    >>
    >> I traced the problem down to Microsoft and found the following:
    >>
    >> RESOLUTION
    >> To resolve this issue:
    >> Insert the CD into the CD drive or DVD drive.
    >> Click Start, and then click Run.
    >> In the Open box, type cmd, and then click OK.
    >> At the command prompt, type the following commands, pressing ENTER
    >> after each command:
    >>
    >>
    >> expand CD-ROM Drive Letter:\i386\config.nt_
    >> c:\windows\system32\config.nt
    >> expand CD-ROM Drive Letter:\i386\autoexec.nt_
    >> c:\windows\system32\autoexec.nt
    >> expand CD-ROM Drive Letter:\i386\command.co_
    >> c:\windows\system32\command.com
    >> exit
    >>
    >> Start or install the program. If the issue is resolved, do not
    >> complete the remaining steps. If the issue is not resolved, go to
    >> the next step.
    >> Note: The Command.com file is not edited or created in this in the
    >> following process. Because of this, you may have to expand it from
    >> your Windows XP CD-ROM.
    >>
    >> Start Notepad.
    >> In Notepad, type the following entries: dos=high, umb
    >> device=%SYSTEMROOT%\system32\himem.sys
    >> files=40
    >> On the File menu, click Save As.
    >> In the File Name box, type Config.nt, and then click Save. Close

    >the
    >> Config.nt file.
    >> On the File menu, click New..
    >> In the new blank document, type the following entries: @echo off
    >> lh %SYSTEMROOT%\system32\mscdexnt.exe
    >> lh %SYSTEMROOT%\system32\redir
    >> lh %SYSTEMROOT%\system32\dosx
    >> SET BLASTER=A220 I5 D1 P330 T3
    >> On the File menu, click Save As.
    >> In the File Name box, type Autoexec.nt, and then click Save. Close
    >> the Autoexec.nt file.
    >> Start Windows Explorer. Locate the Config.nt file, right-click the
    >> Config.nt file, and then click Copy.
    >>
    >> Everything was fine until I got here. I cannot find the
    >> %SYSTEMROOT%\System 32 folder. Can anyone help?

    >
    >c:\Windows\system32
    >
    >Duane :)
    >
    >


    Thank you for your suggestion. I looked for %SYSTEMROOT% in
    c:\Windows\system32 and it was not there. I checked on another
    computer running XP Home and it wasn't there either.

    I must be doing something wrong. I am looking for a folder
    %SYSTEMROOT% and it does not show up with a search. Maybe this is
    why I am having trouble installing the 16 bit program. Is there a
    solution?

    Luke
     
    Luke O'Malley, Oct 9, 2004
    #3
  4. Luke O'Malley

    samuel Guest

    Luke O'Malley <> wrote in
    news:lkU9d.27355$:

    > In article Xns957CA88558B86notmenotmecom@216.148.227.77,
    > Duane Arnold <> said:

    ...cut..

    >>> In the File Name box, type Autoexec.nt, and then click Save.
    >>> Close the Autoexec.nt file.
    >>> Start Windows Explorer. Locate the Config.nt file, right-click
    >>> the Config.nt file, and then click Copy.
    >>>
    >>> Everything was fine until I got here. I cannot find the
    >>> %SYSTEMROOT%\System 32 folder. Can anyone help?

    >>
    >>c:\Windows\system32
    >>
    >>Duane :)
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Thank you for your suggestion. I looked for %SYSTEMROOT% in
    > c:\Windows\system32 and it was not there. I checked on another
    > computer running XP Home and it wasn't there either.
    >
    > I must be doing something wrong. I am looking for a folder
    > %SYSTEMROOT% and it does not show up with a search. Maybe this is
    > why I am having trouble installing the 16 bit program. Is there a
    > solution?
    >
    > Luke


    you are replacing autoexec.nt at c:\Windows\system32
     
    samuel, Oct 9, 2004
    #4
  5. Luke O'Malley

    Duane Arnold Guest

    Luke O'Malley <> wrote in news:lkU9d.27355
    $:

    > In article Xns957CA88558B86notmenotmecom@216.148.227.77,
    > Duane Arnold <> said:
    >>
    >>Luke O'Malley <> wrote in news:ORB9d.25458
    >>$:
    >>
    >>> Hi,
    >>>
    >>> I tried to install a music notation program, Encore. I received a
    >>> msg
    >>>
    >>> "16 bit Windows Subsystem"
    >>> C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32\AUTOEXEC.NT. The system file is not suitable
    >>> for running MS-DOS and Microsoft Windows applications. Choose
    >>> 'Close' to terminate the application.l
    >>>
    >>> I traced the problem down to Microsoft and found the following:
    >>>
    >>> RESOLUTION
    >>> To resolve this issue:
    >>> Insert the CD into the CD drive or DVD drive.
    >>> Click Start, and then click Run.
    >>> In the Open box, type cmd, and then click OK.
    >>> At the command prompt, type the following commands, pressing ENTER
    >>> after each command:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> expand CD-ROM Drive Letter:\i386\config.nt_
    >>> c:\windows\system32\config.nt
    >>> expand CD-ROM Drive Letter:\i386\autoexec.nt_
    >>> c:\windows\system32\autoexec.nt
    >>> expand CD-ROM Drive Letter:\i386\command.co_
    >>> c:\windows\system32\command.com
    >>> exit
    >>>
    >>> Start or install the program. If the issue is resolved, do not
    >>> complete the remaining steps. If the issue is not resolved, go to
    >>> the next step.
    >>> Note: The Command.com file is not edited or created in this in the
    >>> following process. Because of this, you may have to expand it from
    >>> your Windows XP CD-ROM.
    >>>
    >>> Start Notepad.
    >>> In Notepad, type the following entries: dos=high, umb
    >>> device=%SYSTEMROOT%\system32\himem.sys
    >>> files=40
    >>> On the File menu, click Save As.
    >>> In the File Name box, type Config.nt, and then click Save. Close

    >>the
    >>> Config.nt file.
    >>> On the File menu, click New..
    >>> In the new blank document, type the following entries: @echo off
    >>> lh %SYSTEMROOT%\system32\mscdexnt.exe
    >>> lh %SYSTEMROOT%\system32\redir
    >>> lh %SYSTEMROOT%\system32\dosx
    >>> SET BLASTER=A220 I5 D1 P330 T3
    >>> On the File menu, click Save As.
    >>> In the File Name box, type Autoexec.nt, and then click Save. Close
    >>> the Autoexec.nt file.
    >>> Start Windows Explorer. Locate the Config.nt file, right-click the
    >>> Config.nt file, and then click Copy.
    >>>
    >>> Everything was fine until I got here. I cannot find the
    >>> %SYSTEMROOT%\System 32 folder. Can anyone help?

    >>
    >>c:\Windows\system32
    >>
    >>Duane :)
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Thank you for your suggestion. I looked for %SYSTEMROOT% in
    > c:\Windows\system32 and it was not there. I checked on another
    > computer running XP Home and it wasn't there either.
    >
    > I must be doing something wrong. I am looking for a folder
    > %SYSTEMROOT% and it does not show up with a search. Maybe this is
    > why I am having trouble installing the 16 bit program. Is there a
    > solution?
    >
    > Luke
    >
    >
    >



    The %SYSTEMROOT% to the O/S is a substitution variable and when it sees %
    SYSTEMROOT% in a statement it will supplant it with c:\windows on the Win
    XP and Win 2K3 O/S(s), and on the Win NT and Win 2k O/S(s), %SYSTEMROOT%
    is supplanted by c:\winnt. The O/S may not even be installed on the <C>.
    It could be installed on <D> as an example.

    C:\windows is the SystemRoot directory and C:\winnt is the SystemRoot on
    the respective O/S(s).

    You can go to the library or purchase the Windows XP Professional
    Resource Kit Book ISBN 0-7356-1974-3, if you want to know more about the
    XP O/S which can also be applied to the Home edition.

    Duane :)
     
    Duane Arnold, Oct 9, 2004
    #5
  6. Luke O'Malley

    xmp Guest

    Luke O'Malley wrote:

    > I must be doing something wrong. I am looking for a folder
    > %SYSTEMROOT% and it does not show up with a search. Maybe this is
    > why I am having trouble installing the 16 bit program. Is there a
    > solution?
    >
    > Luke


    %SYSTEMROOT% is sort of like a constant in math. It's a representation
    or shortcut for the system root directory. Similar to the way $PATH is
    a variable which represents several directories.

    Read Duane's post again.

    michael
     
    xmp, Oct 9, 2004
    #6
  7. Luke O'Malley

    Duane Arnold Guest

    xmp wrote:

    > Luke O'Malley wrote:
    >
    >> I must be doing something wrong. I am looking for a folder
    >> %SYSTEMROOT% and it does not show up with a search. Maybe this is
    >> why I am having trouble installing the 16 bit program. Is there a
    >> solution?
    >>
    >> Luke

    >
    > %SYSTEMROOT% is sort of like a constant in math. It's a representation
    > or shortcut for the system root directory. Similar to the way $PATH is
    > a variable which represents several directories.
    >
    > Read Duane's post again.
    >
    > michael


    Oh, I forgot. If the OP wants to see SystemRoot, he can type the SET command
    at the DOS Prompt and he will see all the System variables which can be
    addressed by a C++ and Visual Basic programs or even a .bat file.

    Duane :)

    --
    I use SuSe Linux Pro and XP Pro and I like them both.
     
    Duane Arnold, Oct 9, 2004
    #7
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. =?Utf-8?B?QU1ENG1lMg==?=

    Install 64 bit driver to x86 program files?

    =?Utf-8?B?QU1ENG1lMg==?=, Jun 5, 2005, in forum: Windows 64bit
    Replies:
    13
    Views:
    1,024
    Darrell Gorter[MSFT]
    Jun 8, 2005
  2. =?Utf-8?B?VmljdG9yaWE=?=

    trying to install xp pro x64 trial edition

    =?Utf-8?B?VmljdG9yaWE=?=, May 18, 2007, in forum: Windows 64bit
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    370
    Charlie Russel - MVP
    May 18, 2007
  3. =?Utf-8?B?Smlucw==?=

    running 32-bit program on a 64-bit OS.??

    =?Utf-8?B?Smlucw==?=, Oct 11, 2007, in forum: Windows 64bit
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    743
    R. C. White
    Oct 19, 2007
  4. mjhackworth

    Trying to install windows xp pro 64

    mjhackworth, May 5, 2008, in forum: Windows 64bit
    Replies:
    8
    Views:
    377
    Carlos
    May 5, 2008
  5. john royce

    Problem trying to install latest voip program

    john royce, Jul 27, 2009, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    593
    john royce
    Jul 28, 2009
Loading...

Share This Page