Trying to decide between Nikon and Canon

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Jay, Jul 20, 2005.

  1. Jay

    Jay Guest

    Jay, Jul 20, 2005
    #1
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  2. Jay

    Jimmy G Guest

    dpreview.com

    How deep are your pockets?
    Jimmy G, Jul 20, 2005
    #2
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  3. Jay

    Mike Henley Guest

    Jay wrote:
    > Can anyone provide input:
    >
    > http://www.photocamel.com/index.php/topic,3.0.html


    "Wife and I are flying to Israel in a couple of months. I'd like to
    move from film to digital and get serious about taking nice photos. I
    know Nikon and Canon seem to make the best digital cameras. Regarding
    their upper models, what are the general advantages/disadvantages to
    going with each brand?

    The camera needs to be simple enough for a novice to use but
    feature-packed enough for me to grow into as I relearn photography.
    We'd be using the camera for general tourist work, family, etc. Thanks.
    Hope someone is here."

    Too many wrong assumptions here...
    "I know Nikon and Canon seem to make the best digital cameras."

    BIG, BIG mistake!

    Unless you're buying their top of the line you've made yourself a
    sucker, and in fact, this is the premise of their marketting. They make
    top-of-the-line professional models in which they cut no corners in
    quality because anyway the professional clients will pay good money,
    and then they use that quality reputation to make lots of junk for
    consumers like you on which they reap fat profits. You'd get much
    better cameras buying from a mostly consumer brand like Olympus that
    make their consumers cameras the best they can be and don't rely on
    brand reputation, and anyhow, you should research the particular camera
    model you're buying regardless of brand, rather than follow a brand.

    "Wife and I are flying to Israel in a couple of months... The camera
    needs to be simple enough for a novice to use but feature-packed enough
    for me to grow into as I relearn photography... We'd be using the
    camera for general tourist work, family, etc. "

    You oughtta learn a principle called separation of concerns. Do you
    want a camera for the trip or to learn photography? Do NOT say both!
    and do NOT listen to those who tell you you can have both. You have a
    more immediate, certain concern, which is the two-month trip to Israel
    with the family, persumably one that cost a lot of money and is an
    important occasion, and then you have a deferred, uncertain concern
    which is relearning photography (NO, do NOT tell me you're sure you
    want to relearn photography).

    A camera that would take almost foolproof pics for this important trip
    is a far important concern. You need a camera that's so easy to use and
    will take almost foolproof pics, and it needs to be well-built and
    rugged.

    Leave "relearn photography" to your second digital camera purchase, and
    you can almost be sure your first digital camera won't be your last, so
    you might as well concentrate on the needs of the trip. You can sell
    the trip camera on ebay after your return to buy another model for you
    to "relearn photography", and THEN (not now, but THEN!) come back to
    ask for suggestions as to what that model might be.


    "One thing I want in a camera is fast operation."

    Buy the Fujifilm Finepix F10 for your trip. Fast operation, high
    resolution, high iso, low (digital image) noise (and low audible noise
    too!), easy to use, automatic, very long battery life, well-built and
    rugged. Besides basic composition, all you need is to point and shoot
    and the camera, whether it's you, the wife, or some guy you stopped to
    take your pic, and it will take the best pictures that can be had in
    such situations.

    Read more reviews about it here

    http://www.dcviews.com/_fuji/f10.htm

    For example from the dpreview "It may not look it, but the FinePix F10
    is something of a revolution, and is probably the first time a compact
    camera has really shown the potential offered by Super CCD for high
    resolution, high sensitivity and low noise. I cannot emphasize enough
    the value of usable high ISO settings in a compact camera - from
    reducing camera shake to more natural low light portraits (without
    flash) to extended flash range and all the other advantages DSLR users
    take for granted and most compact users - stuck to ISO 200 (or 400 at a
    push) can only dream of... Fuji's Super CCD technology has always been
    very good at capturing very fine high contrast detail, and the new
    sensor in the F10 (working with the lens, of course) takes things to a
    new high, producing one of the highest test chart resolutions we've
    ever seen from a compact camera. As well as outperforming all the 7
    megapixel compact cameras we've tested to date, the F10 is also
    outresolving most 8MP models too - and with only the tiniest amount of
    visible moiré at the very highest frequencies. Very impressive
    indeed... Then of course there's battery life, which at 500 shots per
    charge (CIPA standard) is far better than any similar camera I can
    think of. Even turning on the High Speed mode (which really speeds up
    focus and increases battery drain) leaves you with a camera capable of
    going for a good 300 to 350 shots on a single charge."
    http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/fujifilmf10Zoom/


    It can be had for just over $300 online.

    Then, are you taking a laptop with you or not? How will you store the
    photos? These are questions you should be thinking about too. You can
    either buy a hard-drive based photo storage device, or a portable CD
    burner, or you can burn them onto CDs at internet cafes at your
    destination if you're lucky to conveniently find some.
    Mike Henley, Jul 20, 2005
    #3
  4. Jay

    Mike Henley Guest

    Mike Henley wrote:
    > Jay wrote:
    > > Can anyone provide input:
    > >
    > > http://www.photocamel.com/index.php/topic,3.0.html

    >
    > "Wife and I are flying to Israel in a couple of months. I'd like to
    > move from film to digital and get serious about taking nice photos. I
    > know Nikon and Canon seem to make the best digital cameras. Regarding
    > their upper models, what are the general advantages/disadvantages to
    > going with each brand?
    >
    > The camera needs to be simple enough for a novice to use but
    > feature-packed enough for me to grow into as I relearn photography.
    > We'd be using the camera for general tourist work, family, etc. Thanks.
    > Hope someone is here."
    >
    > Too many wrong assumptions here...
    > "I know Nikon and Canon seem to make the best digital cameras."
    >
    > BIG, BIG mistake!
    >
    > Unless you're buying their top of the line you've made yourself a
    > sucker, and in fact, this is the premise of their marketting. They make
    > top-of-the-line professional models in which they cut no corners in
    > quality because anyway the professional clients will pay good money,
    > and then they use that quality reputation to make lots of junk for
    > consumers like you on which they reap fat profits. You'd get much
    > better cameras buying from a mostly consumer brand like Olympus that
    > make their consumers cameras the best they can be and don't rely on
    > brand reputation, and anyhow, you should research the particular camera
    > model you're buying regardless of brand, rather than follow a brand.
    >
    > "Wife and I are flying to Israel in a couple of months... The camera
    > needs to be simple enough for a novice to use but feature-packed enough
    > for me to grow into as I relearn photography... We'd be using the
    > camera for general tourist work, family, etc. "
    >
    > You oughtta learn a principle called separation of concerns. Do you
    > want a camera for the trip or to learn photography? Do NOT say both!
    > and do NOT listen to those who tell you you can have both. You have a
    > more immediate, certain concern, which is the two-month trip to Israel
    > with the family, persumably one that cost a lot of money and is an
    > important occasion, and then you have a deferred, uncertain concern
    > which is relearning photography (NO, do NOT tell me you're sure you
    > want to relearn photography).
    >
    > A camera that would take almost foolproof pics for this important trip
    > is a far important concern. You need a camera that's so easy to use and
    > will take almost foolproof pics, and it needs to be well-built and
    > rugged.
    >
    > Leave "relearn photography" to your second digital camera purchase, and
    > you can almost be sure your first digital camera won't be your last, so
    > you might as well concentrate on the needs of the trip. You can sell
    > the trip camera on ebay after your return to buy another model for you
    > to "relearn photography", and THEN (not now, but THEN!) come back to
    > ask for suggestions as to what that model might be.
    >
    >
    > "One thing I want in a camera is fast operation."
    >
    > Buy the Fujifilm Finepix F10 for your trip. Fast operation, high
    > resolution, high iso, low (digital image) noise (and low audible noise
    > too!), easy to use, automatic, very long battery life, well-built and
    > rugged. Besides basic composition, all you need is to point and shoot
    > and the camera, whether it's you, the wife, or some guy you stopped to
    > take your pic, and it will take the best pictures that can be had in
    > such situations.
    >
    > Read more reviews about it here
    >
    > http://www.dcviews.com/_fuji/f10.htm
    >
    > For example from the dpreview "It may not look it, but the FinePix F10
    > is something of a revolution, and is probably the first time a compact
    > camera has really shown the potential offered by Super CCD for high
    > resolution, high sensitivity and low noise. I cannot emphasize enough
    > the value of usable high ISO settings in a compact camera - from
    > reducing camera shake to more natural low light portraits (without
    > flash) to extended flash range and all the other advantages DSLR users
    > take for granted and most compact users - stuck to ISO 200 (or 400 at a
    > push) can only dream of... Fuji's Super CCD technology has always been
    > very good at capturing very fine high contrast detail, and the new
    > sensor in the F10 (working with the lens, of course) takes things to a
    > new high, producing one of the highest test chart resolutions we've
    > ever seen from a compact camera. As well as outperforming all the 7
    > megapixel compact cameras we've tested to date, the F10 is also
    > outresolving most 8MP models too - and with only the tiniest amount of
    > visible moiré at the very highest frequencies. Very impressive
    > indeed... Then of course there's battery life, which at 500 shots per
    > charge (CIPA standard) is far better than any similar camera I can
    > think of. Even turning on the High Speed mode (which really speeds up
    > focus and increases battery drain) leaves you with a camera capable of
    > going for a good 300 to 350 shots on a single charge."
    > http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/fujifilmf10Zoom/
    >
    >
    > It can be had for just over $300 online.
    >
    > Then, are you taking a laptop with you or not? How will you store the
    > photos? These are questions you should be thinking about too. You can
    > either buy a hard-drive based photo storage device, or a portable CD
    > burner, or you can burn them onto CDs at internet cafes at your
    > destination if you're lucky to conveniently find some.


    And remember to buy a lowepro bag for your camera anyhow - however
    rugged the camera may be it'll save it from unnecessary scratches and
    otherwise. It'll reduce the chances of your camera will stop working
    due to some unfortunate trauma on the trip, or that its price will go
    down due to cosmetic problems when you decide to put it on ebay after
    your return.
    Mike Henley, Jul 20, 2005
    #4
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