Try again - Fuji F10/F11- taking pictures inside churches in Europe

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by qwert2b2, Dec 14, 2005.

  1. qwert2b2

    qwert2b2 Guest

    Greetings! I have read that F10/F11 can take pictures in ISO 800-1600
    without much noise. I am going to Europe next summer. I am going to
    take pictures of inside the churches like Canterbury Cathedral, York
    Minister etc and various museums in Europe. Do you think that the
    F10/F11 can do the job using high ISO? I have a DSLR but I do not want
    to carry it to Europe. With thanks.
     
    qwert2b2, Dec 14, 2005
    #1
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  2. qwert2b2

    ASAAR Guest

    On 13 Dec 2005 18:05:18 -0800, qwert2b2 wrote:

    > Greetings! I have read that F10/F11 can take pictures in ISO 800-1600
    > without much noise. I am going to Europe next summer. I am going to
    > take pictures of inside the churches like Canterbury Cathedral, York
    > Minister etc and various museums in Europe. Do you think that the
    > F10/F11 can do the job using high ISO? I have a DSLR but I do not want
    > to carry it to Europe. With thanks.


    Unless the brightness level in those churches and museums is
    known, there's no way to determine if the F10/F11 will be able to do
    the job, and the results will vary. Only a DSLR will do better, and
    the F10 might do better than some of the older ones. One way to
    look at it is that if the F10/F11 only produces fair results in some
    of the darker churches and museums, any other P&S camera will do a
    poor job or worse. What will help would be to try to find the most
    portable means of steadying the camera, which will allow longer
    usable shutter speeds. Tripods are normally not allowed, but there
    are other things you may be able to use instead. One device I've
    read about is essentially a long cord that attaches at one end to
    the camera's tripod socket. The other end either loops around your
    shoe or you step on it. When the cord is kept taut, it becomes
    effectively a monopod, but takes up little space. You could put it
    in a pocket. You might even be able to make one for little cost if
    you have the right screw, of purchase a very cheap tabletop tripod,
    hack it into bits (or unscrew it) and make the device yourself. And
    of course practice a bit with it before the trip, both using the
    strap (if you buy or make one) and also to see for yourself ahead of
    time what the slowest shutter speed is that you can hold steady
    enough to produce decent shots when the lighting is dim.
     
    ASAAR, Dec 14, 2005
    #2
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  3. Re: Try again - Fuji F10/F11- taking pictures inside churches inEurope

    qwert2b2 wrote:
    > Greetings! I have read that F10/F11 can take pictures in ISO 800-1600
    > without much noise. I am going to Europe next summer. I am going to
    > take pictures of inside the churches like Canterbury Cathedral, York
    > Minister etc and various museums in Europe. Do you think that the
    > F10/F11 can do the job using high ISO? I have a DSLR but I do not want
    > to carry it to Europe. With thanks.
    >

    I've taken a lot of pictures in churches and museums in Europe, both
    film and digital, and I only carry a SLR/DSLR. In my experience,
    even a DSLR hits the limit in the darkest churches, and getting
    good images is a challenge. I only use image stabilized lenses too.

    Note, not only are tripods usually not allowed, flash is not
    either. Some places also do not allow any camera.

    So, while a P&S can get images in some situations, the DSLR
    will allow more situations to be imaged well.

    Roger Clark
    photos at: http://www.clarkvision.com
    (no church pictures on the site yet)
     
    Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark), Dec 14, 2005
    #3
  4. qwert2b2

    Scott W Guest

    qwert2b2 wrote:
    > Greetings! I have read that F10/F11 can take pictures in ISO 800-1600
    > without much noise. I am going to Europe next summer. I am going to
    > take pictures of inside the churches like Canterbury Cathedral, York
    > Minister etc and various museums in Europe. Do you think that the
    > F10/F11 can do the job using high ISO? I have a DSLR but I do not want
    > to carry it to Europe. With thanks.


    You might find yourself getting frustrated with the limited wide angle
    end of either the F10 or the F11. You might try doing some church
    shots around home with your DSLR but limit it to the same effect 35mm
    FL that you would get with the F10 or F11. For the Canons and their
    1.6 crop factor this would be a FL of 22.5mm, 1.6 x 22.5mm = 36mm,
    which is what the F10 and F11 would give you.

    I would be pretty tempted to take with the DSLR and since I have a
    Canon I would be looking at getting either the EF-S 10-22 or the EF-S
    17-85. The 17-85 is a slower lens, f/4-5.6, but it does have IS. The
    10-22 is of course going to be able to capture a lot more at once and
    is a bit faster at f.3.5-4.5

    Scott
     
    Scott W, Dec 14, 2005
    #4
  5. qwert2b2

    mirhe Guest

    Photos inside with high ISO??Use low ISO and tripoid!!!!!

    --
    Buy photos with license
    Sell your photos
    http://fotobank.tivi.net.pl/linki.html

    Uzytkownik "Scott W" <> napisal w wiadomosci
    news:...
    >
    > qwert2b2 wrote:
    >> Greetings! I have read that F10/F11 can take pictures in ISO 800-1600
    >> without much noise. I am going to Europe next summer. I am going to
    >> take pictures of inside the churches like Canterbury Cathedral, York
    >> Minister etc and various museums in Europe. Do you think that the
    >> F10/F11 can do the job using high ISO? I have a DSLR but I do not want
    >> to carry it to Europe. With thanks.

    >
    > You might find yourself getting frustrated with the limited wide angle
    > end of either the F10 or the F11. You might try doing some church
    > shots around home with your DSLR but limit it to the same effect 35mm
    > FL that you would get with the F10 or F11. For the Canons and their
    > 1.6 crop factor this would be a FL of 22.5mm, 1.6 x 22.5mm = 36mm,
    > which is what the F10 and F11 would give you.
    >
    > I would be pretty tempted to take with the DSLR and since I have a
    > Canon I would be looking at getting either the EF-S 10-22 or the EF-S
    > 17-85. The 17-85 is a slower lens, f/4-5.6, but it does have IS. The
    > 10-22 is of course going to be able to capture a lot more at once and
    > is a bit faster at f.3.5-4.5
    >
    > Scott
    >
     
    mirhe, Dec 14, 2005
    #5
  6. qwert2b2

    Scott W Guest

    mirhe wrote:
    > Photos inside with high ISO??Use low ISO and tripoid!!!!!


    Sure, if they allow a tripod, I would bet most don't.

    Scott
     
    Scott W, Dec 14, 2005
    #6
  7. qwert2b2

    John Bean Guest

    On Wed, 14 Dec 2005 13:10:10 +0100, "mirhe"
    <> wrote:

    >Photos inside with high ISO??Use low ISO and tripoid!!!!!


    Tripods are often prohibited in such places.

    PS: I think your "!" key is stuck ;-)

    --
    John Bean
     
    John Bean, Dec 14, 2005
    #7
  8. qwert2b2

    mirhe Guest

    I often use small tripoid (20 cm ) and stay his at bench or chais or floor
    or handrail or another discreet place

    --
    Buy photos with license
    Sell your photos
    http://fotobank.tivi.net.pl/linki.html
    Uzytkownik "John Bean" <> napisal w wiadomosci
    news:...
    > On Wed, 14 Dec 2005 13:10:10 +0100, "mirhe"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>Photos inside with high ISO??Use low ISO and tripoid!!!!!

    >
    > Tripods are often prohibited in such places.
    >
    > PS: I think your "!" key is stuck ;-)
    >
    > --
    > John Bean
     
    mirhe, Dec 14, 2005
    #8
  9. qwert2b2

    AnthonyL Guest

    On 14 Dec 2005 04:15:17 -0800, "Scott W" <> wrote:

    >
    >mirhe wrote:
    >> Photos inside with high ISO??Use low ISO and tripoid!!!!!

    >
    >Sure, if they allow a tripod, I would bet most don't.
    >


    No-one has ever bothered me when I have used my mini-tripod which is
    semi-permanently attached to my camera. There is usually something
    handy to rest it on or brace it against and I think I've had some
    quite acceptable results. It should work well with a light camera and
    you don't need anything too sturdy for indoor use.


    --
    AnthonyL
     
    AnthonyL, Dec 14, 2005
    #9
  10. qwert2b2

    ASAAR Guest

    On Wed, 14 Dec 2005 12:18:34 +0000, John Bean wrote:

    >>Photos inside with high ISO??Use low ISO and tripoid!!!!!

    >
    > Tripods are often prohibited in such places.
    >
    > PS: I think your "!" key is stuck ;-)


    It's not stuck. It's acting as a spell check warning indicator.
     
    ASAAR, Dec 14, 2005
    #10
  11. qwert2b2

    Guest

    I have taken many such pictures in the generally dark interiors of
    Italian churches, using an Ultrapod II. It can be used as a small
    tabletop tripod, or you can use the velcro strap to attach it things
    like scaffolding, chairs, pews, etc. It's also great for night shots
    outdoors. The Ultrapod only weighs about an ounce and costs about $15.
    One of my best photographic investments ever!

    *>UncaMikey
     
    , Dec 14, 2005
    #11
  12. qwert2b2

    Rich Guest

    On 14 Dec 2005 04:15:17 -0800, "Scott W" <> wrote:

    >
    >mirhe wrote:
    >> Photos inside with high ISO??Use low ISO and tripoid!!!!!

    >
    >Sure, if they allow a tripod, I would bet most don't.
    >
    >Scott


    Many indoor public venues won't, for liability reasons.
    They think someone might trip over the legs.
    At least that's what one museum told me.
    -Rich
     
    Rich, Dec 15, 2005
    #12
  13. "Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)" <>
    wrote in message news:...
    SNIP
    > I've taken a lot of pictures in churches and museums in Europe, both
    > film and digital, and I only carry a SLR/DSLR.


    SNIP
    > Note, not only are tripods usually not allowed, flash is not
    > either. Some places also do not allow any camera.


    Depending on the country, and depending on church or (commercial !)
    museum, be (subtly) blunt but polite.

    I was recently told (in the Netherlands, where I live) that tripods
    (as if they could tell the difference) weren't "really" (a futile,
    don't offer an attempt to be polite to me) allowed in the museum. I
    said I was carrying a monopod, and that I would be careful to not
    knocking into things I wasn't supposed to, as I walked on (!).
    I would of course have (attemped to ;-) ) request(ed) my entrance fee
    back, if they would have persevered, which they didn't.

    Being a polite person myself, I would have obviously complied to the
    house rules, but only if told so ... (being a vocal local can help in
    estimating the severity of the situation, I guess). Depending on
    nationality, local people might be a bit more restrictive with
    admittance.

    Besides, I didn't shoot anything anything there as it wasn't important
    enough to get my flash unit(s) out of the bag at that visit. Lot's of
    cultural enlightenment otherwise though.

    Lesson, nothing gained, nothing lost (but understand/respect the local
    (!) customs and peculiarities, especially in Europe where local
    differences are more common than uniformity).

    Bart
     
    Bart van der Wolf, Dec 15, 2005
    #13
  14. "Scott W" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    SNIP
    >> I am going to Europe next summer. I am going to take pictures
    >> of inside the churches like Canterbury Cathedral, York Minister
    >> etc and various museums in Europe.


    SNIP
    > You might find yourself getting frustrated with the limited wide
    > angle end of either the F10 or the F11. You might try doing
    > some church shots around home with your DSLR but limit it to
    > the same effect 35mm FL that you would get with the F10 or F11.


    Do practice with stitching multiple (overlapping) shots. The better
    you get at it, the better you will be able and post-process your
    images into full blown wide-angle shots. Afterall, many locations in
    Europe are more limited in shooting space/distance than you may be
    accustomed to.

    Bart
     
    Bart van der Wolf, Dec 15, 2005
    #14
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