Troubleshooting IP routing protocols

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by syuga2012@gmail.com, Jan 20, 2009.

  1. Guest

    Hi,

    I would like to know about troubleshooting IP routing protocols in
    general and RIP in particular.

    Some info on troubleshooting techniques would help.
    Also, in a network of about 12 RIP routers if a route is flapping in
    one of the routers, what would be symptoms to look out for (how do i
    know if routes are flapping)? What would be remedial action.?
    Appreciate your valuable reply.

    Thanks,
    syuga
     
    , Jan 20, 2009
    #1
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  2. Trendkill Guest

    On Jan 20, 9:19 am, "" <> wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I would like to know about troubleshooting IP routing protocols in
    > general and RIP in particular.
    >
    > Some info on troubleshooting techniques would help.
    > Also, in a network of about 12 RIP routers if a route is flapping in
    > one of the routers, what would be symptoms to look out for (how do i
    > know if routes are flapping)? What would be remedial action.?
    > Appreciate your valuable reply.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > syuga


    A route flap can often come from an interface flap which then makes
    the route come from another path or router from an endpoint
    perspective. The bottom line is that show ip route and show ip
    protocol are your best friends, and you need to isolate the flaps back
    to a source device and time so you can isolate the issue. You can
    also debug to help see the rip messages.
     
    Trendkill, Jan 20, 2009
    #2
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  3. bod43 Guest

    On 20 Jan, 15:19, Trendkill <> wrote:
    > On Jan 20, 9:19 am, "" <> wrote:
    >
    > > Hi,

    >
    > > I would like to know about troubleshooting IP routing protocols in
    > > general and RIP in particular.

    >
    > > Some info on troubleshooting techniques would help.
    > > Also, in a network of about 12 RIP routers if a route is flapping in
    > > one of the routers, what would be symptoms to look out for (how do i
    > > know if routes are flapping)? What would be remedial action.?
    > > Appreciate your valuable reply.

    >
    > > Thanks,
    > > syuga

    >
    > A route flap can often come from an interface flap which then makes
    > the route come from another path or router from an endpoint
    > perspective.  The bottom line is that show ip route and show ip
    > protocol are your best friends, and you need to isolate the flaps back
    > to a source device and time so you can isolate the issue.  You can
    > also debug to help see the rip messages.


    I think the place to start would be sh ip route

    From cisco.com
    "R 192.168.1.0/24 [120/1] via 10.10.10.1, 00:00:08, Tunnel0"

    I think that this shows the age of the route and the interface it
    was learned on. With a bit of luck the age will not be updated
    with each RIP update:) so any flaps will be evident in short
    route age times.
     
    bod43, Jan 20, 2009
    #3
  4. Sam Wilson Guest

    In article
    <>,
    bod43 <> wrote:

    > On 20 Jan, 15:19, Trendkill <> wrote:
    > > On Jan 20, 9:19 am, "" <> wrote:
    > >
    > > > Hi,

    > >
    > > > I would like to know about troubleshooting IP routing protocols in
    > > > general and RIP in particular.

    > >
    > > > Some info on troubleshooting techniques would help.
    > > > Also, in a network of about 12 RIP routers if a route is flapping in
    > > > one of the routers, what would be symptoms to look out for (how do i
    > > > know if routes are flapping)? What would be remedial action.?
    > > > Appreciate your valuable reply.

    > >
    > > > Thanks,
    > > > syuga

    > >
    > > A route flap can often come from an interface flap which then makes
    > > the route come from another path or router from an endpoint
    > > perspective.  The bottom line is that show ip route and show ip
    > > protocol are your best friends, and you need to isolate the flaps back
    > > to a source device and time so you can isolate the issue.  You can
    > > also debug to help see the rip messages.

    >
    > I think the place to start would be sh ip route
    >
    > From cisco.com
    > "R 192.168.1.0/24 [120/1] via 10.10.10.1, 00:00:08, Tunnel0"
    >
    > I think that this shows the age of the route and the interface it
    > was learned on. With a bit of luck the age will not be updated
    > with each RIP update:) so any flaps will be evident in short
    > route age times.


    If your routers are sufficiently beefy (and I think anything is, these
    days unless you have hundreds of routes which are flapping, and you'd
    probably already have noticed the CPU load from that or lots of very
    short ages in the routing table above) then the next thing I'd do would
    be 'debug ip routing', but do it carefully. Make sure the router isn't
    logging to the console. Open two telnet or ssh connections, do a 'term
    mon' on one of them and issue 'debug ip routing' on the other. Be ready
    with 'no debug ip routing' in case you need it quickly! 'show ip route
    w.x.y.z [m.n.p.q]' can also be useful.

    Sam

    Sam
     
    Sam Wilson, Jan 22, 2009
    #4
  5. wali

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2009
    Messages:
    8
    I would recommend reading a book called troubleshooting IP routing protocols, if you wanna know more about troubleshooting IP protocols.
     
    wali, Feb 11, 2009
    #5
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