trouble booting

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by Jeff, Dec 22, 2006.

  1. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    So I woke up the other day, and my computer was stuck in "sleep" mode.
    I have the monitor go off after 10 minutes, and usually leave it like
    that over night. I went to wake it up in the morning, and the monitor
    wouldn't go on. I restarted a bunch of times and the monitor still
    wouldn't go on.

    To test the monitor, I unplugged everything and brought my computer
    into the other room and hooked it up to a different monitor. I went to
    turn on the computer, and nothing happened. No fans or anything.

    So now I'm stuck and don't know what is wrong with my computer. I
    figured that there could be a problem with the power switch, so I
    tested that by shorting the power switch prongs on the motherboard, so
    dice. Could there be a problem the motherboard or the power supply?
    There is a light on on the motherboard when the computer is plugged in,
    but I don't know what that eliminates as a potential problem.

    Any ideas in a direction to head would be awesome.

    p.s. I have an NVIDIA nForce2
    Jeff, Dec 22, 2006
    #1
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  2. Jeff

    Jesse Guest

    On 21 Dec 2006 18:15:41 -0800, "Jeff" <>
    wrote:

    >So I woke up the other day, and my computer was stuck in "sleep" mode.
    >I have the monitor go off after 10 minutes, and usually leave it like
    >that over night. I went to wake it up in the morning, and the monitor
    >wouldn't go on. I restarted a bunch of times and the monitor still
    >wouldn't go on.
    >
    >To test the monitor, I unplugged everything and brought my computer
    >into the other room and hooked it up to a different monitor. I went to
    >turn on the computer, and nothing happened. No fans or anything.
    >
    >So now I'm stuck and don't know what is wrong with my computer. I
    >figured that there could be a problem with the power switch, so I
    >tested that by shorting the power switch prongs on the motherboard, so
    >dice. Could there be a problem the motherboard or the power supply?
    >There is a light on on the motherboard when the computer is plugged in,
    >but I don't know what that eliminates as a potential problem.
    >
    >Any ideas in a direction to head would be awesome.
    >
    >p.s. I have an NVIDIA nForce2

    !00% power supply problem. Replace & carry on computing. jesse
    Jesse, Dec 22, 2006
    #2
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  3. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    even though there is a green light on on the motherboard? And don't
    power supply's usually degrade after a while? Not just die all of a
    sudden?
    Jeff, Dec 22, 2006
    #3
  4. Jeff

    Neil Green Guest

    "Jeff" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > even though there is a green light on on the
    > motherboard? And don't
    > power supply's usually degrade after a while? Not
    > just die all of a
    > sudden?


    Yes, and no, in that order.
    Generic PSU's are cheap, but spend the xtra $$ and get
    a decent one.
    Antec are good.
    Neil Green, Dec 22, 2006
    #4
  5. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    new update:

    I took the power supply out of my dad's computer and put it in mine,
    nothing. So my power supply is fine. What else could be wrong? Is
    there another method of checking to see if the power switch works?
    Jeff, Dec 22, 2006
    #5
  6. Jeff

    Jesse Guest

    On 22 Dec 2006 11:00:42 -0800, "Jeff" <>
    wrote:

    >new update:
    >
    >I took the power supply out of my dad's computer and put it in mine,
    >nothing. So my power supply is fine. What else could be wrong? Is
    >there another method of checking to see if the power switch works?

    Not all ps's are wired the same. ensure that you don't mix a dell unit
    in there if both computers are not dell. jesse
    Jesse, Dec 22, 2006
    #6
  7. Jeff

    Neil Green Guest

    "Jeff" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > new update:
    >
    > I took the power supply out of my dad's computer and
    > put it in mine,
    > nothing. So my power supply is fine. What else
    > could be wrong? Is
    > there another method of checking to see if the power
    > switch works?


    You can change the connectors on the board and use the
    reset switch in place of the power switch, although
    these low voltage switches are normally very reliable.
    Remove the motherboard battery and leave it out for a
    good five minutes.
    If you have a meter test it, if not buy one from the
    supermarket for a few dollars, they're usually a
    CR2032 or something.
    A bit of a long shot but I've seen it before and it's
    a cheap option.
    The other alternative seems to be a board failure.
    Neil Green, Dec 22, 2006
    #7
  8. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    yeah, I tried taking the battery out after researching the problem. It
    was pretty low, so I bought a new one, but it still doesn't work.

    so I guess I've narrowed it down to a bad motherboard? does the light
    on the motherboard have anything to do with it's functionality?
    Jeff, Dec 23, 2006
    #8
  9. Jeff

    Neil Green Guest

    "Jeff" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > yeah, I tried taking the battery out after
    > researching the problem. It
    > was pretty low, so I bought a new one, but it still
    > doesn't work.
    >
    > so I guess I've narrowed it down to a bad
    > motherboard? does the light
    > on the motherboard have anything to do with it's
    > functionality?


    No.
    Check the board for bulging capacitors.
    Try running it with only the board, RAM and video card
    with the PC speaker connected.
    Even without the RAM you should at least get some
    error beeps from the speaker.
    If not the board has probably failed.
    The good news is that they are very cheap on Ebay.
    Neil Green, Dec 23, 2006
    #9
  10. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    i'm not convinced that my motherboard is bad. is there a concrete way
    to single out the mobo and make sure it is indeed the problem? maybe
    some kind of jumper fell out or something really simple like that?
    Jeff, Dec 24, 2006
    #10
  11. Jeff

    Neil Green Guest

    "Jeff" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > i'm not convinced that my motherboard is bad. is
    > there a concrete way
    > to single out the mobo and make sure it is indeed
    > the problem? maybe
    > some kind of jumper fell out or something really
    > simple like that?


    You haven't said what sort of CPU you're running, but
    later boards have few jumpers, and jumpers are highly
    unlikely to dislodge by themselves in any case.
    If you want to be thorough take the board out of the
    case to eliminate the possibility of a short to earth
    and run the board on the bench on it's own with only
    the PC speaker connected using a known good PSU.
    You should at the very least get a series of error
    beeps through the speaker.
    If not then it's a fair bet that either the board or
    CPU is faulty.
    If you do then add components one at a time until you
    can isolate the cause of the problem.
    Neil Green, Dec 24, 2006
    #11
  12. Jeff

    w_tom Guest

    Jeff wrote:
    > i'm not convinced that my motherboard is bad. is there a concrete way
    > to single out the mobo and make sure it is indeed the problem? maybe
    > some kind of jumper fell out or something really simple like that?


    Yes, and it requires the simple 3.5 digit multimeter. All that
    swapping and moving could have been avoided by doing this the first
    time.

    First, voltage on the purple wire (from power supply to motherboard)
    must be measured when computer is off but AC power cord is connected.
    That voltage must measure more than 4.87.

    Next measure green wire voltage both before and when power switch is
    pressed. That voltage must be above 2 volts and then drop to less than
    0.8 volts when switch is pressed.

    Finally, measure gray wire voltage. It must start at near 0 volts
    and then rise well above 2.4 volts within seconds of pressing the power
    switch.

    Inputs to the to power supply controller are power switch, purple
    wire, and gray wire. For startup, the purple wire and power switch
    inputs must be correct and of sufficient voltage. If those inputs are
    correct and the green wire does not drop below 0.8 volts (order the
    power supply on), then either the motherboard controller is defective
    (most likely for these defective readings), or power supply has somehow
    connected too much power to the green wire (very unlikely but also can
    be tested with the meter).

    In put a minute with the meter, we would have established where the
    problem exists and without swapping anything. I suspect you will find
    the green wire voltage does not drop in response to good inputs from
    purple and power switch wires.

    Check that CMOS battery also with the meter. That 3 volt battery
    required replacement if voltage is below 2.8 volts. A voltage of below
    2.4 volts would cause problems. But again, second with the meter tells
    all - without swapping parts.
    w_tom, Dec 24, 2006
    #12
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