Todays technology tomorows junk?

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Robert Cooze, Oct 23, 2005.

  1. Robert Cooze

    Robert Cooze Guest

    Today I am looking at my living room and I have the stuff from dead
    relations. Its my grandfathers clock and some other stuff. In there day
    they were the hiteck stuff like our computers and such. After a clean
    out the clock keeps good time and does what it was made to do. I also
    have both watches from both grandfathers both work and can be used at
    the drop of a hat.
    Now my first watch that I used for day to day uce does not work any more
    and will not ever go. The watch I am using now will never be like the
    grandfather clock when my child has kids that are my age my stuff will
    just be technolagl junk, with some family ties but my grandfather's
    clock will still be working even the watches.
    I serverly doubt that anything we use today will even be remotely usfule
    in the years to come my dads first 386 does not function any more I sold
    my second and third computers many moons ago, and five and six have been
    junked. My film camera may be still working (if the electronics
    survive) but my new digital camera properly wont work past it's year
    five or six if it has not been replaced before then.
    So the question is what do you use today that might be used by your
    grandchildren.

    --
    http://cooze.co.nz home of the RecyclerMan aka Robert Cooze

    / __/ / / / / /__ / / ___/ / __/ / / / |/ / /__ /
    / / / /_/ / / /_/ / _-' / __/ / / / /_/ / / /| / _-'
    ___\ ____/ ____/ /___/ /____/ /_/ ___\ ____/ /_/ /_/ |_/ /___/
     
    Robert Cooze, Oct 23, 2005
    #1
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  2. Robert Cooze wrote:
    > So the question is what do you use today that might be used by your
    > grandchildren.


    The odd pocket calculator may survive. I recall a while ago I had
    someone tried to argue that even the pocket calculator would receive a
    huge boost in power. The fact remains that once something does what it
    needs to, there is no need to throw more computing power at it.
    Multi-megahertz pocket calculators have existed for well over a decade,
    yet comparitively few people need (or will ever need) more than what the
    basic free giveaway models offer. While in a few decades some of my
    calculators may still technically function, they will only perform the
    function of something that has no real value associated with it.

    Anything relying on a computer and that is more technically complex will
    probably not survive, including my HP 48GX, one of those multi-megahertz
    calculators.

    The Other Guy
     
    The Other Guy, Oct 23, 2005
    #2
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  3. Robert Cooze

    Robert Cooze Guest

    The Other Guy wrote:
    > Robert Cooze wrote:
    >
    >> So the question is what do you use today that might be used by your
    >> grandchildren.

    >
    >
    > The odd pocket calculator may survive. I recall a while ago I had
    > someone tried to argue that even the pocket calculator would receive a
    > huge boost in power. The fact remains that once something does what it
    > needs to, there is no need to throw more computing power at it.
    > Multi-megahertz pocket calculators have existed for well over a decade,
    > yet comparitively few people need (or will ever need) more than what the
    > basic free giveaway models offer. While in a few decades some of my
    > calculators may still technically function, they will only perform the
    > function of something that has no real value associated with it.
    >
    > Anything relying on a computer and that is more technically complex will
    > probably not survive, including my HP 48GX, one of those multi-megahertz
    > calculators.
    >
    > The Other Guy

    I think the word survive is a better term. what about Sterios some of
    min might survive but will they have the collectibility of say the valve
    radios and record players? even when they don't go the wood work of the
    casing has soem value i guess.

    --
    http://cooze.co.nz home of the RecyclerMan aka Robert Cooze

    / __/ / / / / /__ / / ___/ / __/ / / / |/ / /__ /
    / / / /_/ / / /_/ / _-' / __/ / / / /_/ / / /| / _-'
    ___\ ____/ ____/ /___/ /____/ /_/ ___\ ____/ /_/ /_/ |_/ /___/
     
    Robert Cooze, Oct 23, 2005
    #3
  4. Robert Cooze

    thingy Guest

    The Other Guy wrote:
    > Robert Cooze wrote:
    >
    >> So the question is what do you use today that might be used by your
    >> grandchildren.

    >
    >
    > The odd pocket calculator may survive. I recall a while ago I had
    > someone tried to argue that even the pocket calculator would receive a
    > huge boost in power. The fact remains that once something does what it
    > needs to, there is no need to throw more computing power at it.
    > Multi-megahertz pocket calculators have existed for well over a decade,
    > yet comparitively few people need (or will ever need) more than what the
    > basic free giveaway models offer. While in a few decades some of my
    > calculators may still technically function, they will only perform the
    > function of something that has no real value associated with it.
    >
    > Anything relying on a computer and that is more technically complex will
    > probably not survive, including my HP 48GX, one of those multi-megahertz
    > calculators.
    >
    > The Other Guy


    I still have my first casio which I got at 16 so it is nearly 30 years
    old.....last year 2 x aa's saw it spring into life.....

    My son plays with my makita calc as it has huge buttons and is solar
    powered........

    regards

    Thing
     
    thingy, Oct 23, 2005
    #4
  5. Robert Cooze

    thingy Guest

    Robert Cooze wrote:
    > Today I am looking at my living room and I have the stuff from dead
    > relations. Its my grandfathers clock and some other stuff. In there day
    > they were the hiteck stuff like our computers and such. After a clean
    > out the clock keeps good time and does what it was made to do. I also
    > have both watches from both grandfathers both work and can be used at
    > the drop of a hat.
    > Now my first watch that I used for day to day uce does not work any more
    > and will not ever go. The watch I am using now will never be like the
    > grandfather clock when my child has kids that are my age my stuff will
    > just be technolagl junk, with some family ties but my grandfather's
    > clock will still be working even the watches.
    > I serverly doubt that anything we use today will even be remotely usfule
    > in the years to come my dads first 386 does not function any more I sold
    > my second and third computers many moons ago, and five and six have been
    > junked. My film camera may be still working (if the electronics
    > survive) but my new digital camera properly wont work past it's year
    > five or six if it has not been replaced before then.
    > So the question is what do you use today that might be used by your
    > grandchildren.
    >


    Yes I wonder, my Grandparents clock was stuffed so it was dumped but I
    told my mum to keep their china dogs, which I want when she passes
    away....(best place for them is with her....young kids and toddlers is
    not a survival environment for large china victorian dogs....)

    My son plays with my grandads old pocket watch (busted anyway) and their
    clockwork alarm clock, he thinks it fun to wind it up.....

    About the only thing of real value I can see leaving them and hence
    thier grandchildren is the house....should be here 40~50 years from
    now....Possibly my old audi quattro, if they can still get petrol 97
    octane....

    regards

    Thing
     
    thingy, Oct 23, 2005
    #5
  6. Robert Cooze

    -=rjh=- Guest

    Robert Cooze wrote:
    > The Other Guy wrote:
    >
    >> Robert Cooze wrote:
    >>
    >>> So the question is what do you use today that might be used by your
    >>> grandchildren.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> The odd pocket calculator may survive. I recall a while ago I had
    >> someone tried to argue that even the pocket calculator would receive a
    >> huge boost in power. The fact remains that once something does what it
    >> needs to, there is no need to throw more computing power at it.
    >> Multi-megahertz pocket calculators have existed for well over a
    >> decade, yet comparitively few people need (or will ever need) more
    >> than what the basic free giveaway models offer. While in a few decades
    >> some of my calculators may still technically function, they will only
    >> perform the function of something that has no real value associated
    >> with it.
    >>
    >> Anything relying on a computer and that is more technically complex
    >> will probably not survive, including my HP 48GX, one of those
    >> multi-megahertz calculators.
    >>
    >> The Other Guy

    >
    > I think the word survive is a better term. what about Sterios some of
    > min might survive but will they have the collectibility of say the valve
    > radios and record players? even when they don't go the wood work of the
    > casing has soem value i guess.
    >


    But surely it is because stuff gets thrown out, that makes the remaining
    few examples collectable? Furniture and the like has a very long life,
    but almost all technology becomes genuinely obsolete, eventually is
    regarded as rubbish, then later becomes collectable. I guess the problem
    for us now, is that the rate of change is so much faster that most stuff
    is in landfill within 10 years, well ahead of when the next generation
    can get hold of it. And low purchase prices mean people attach even less
    value to products; consequently longevity is rarely a design
    consideration.

    Things like valve radios are difficult to keep going, but enthusiasts do
    manage to do it; likewise the same for vintage car enthusiasts. The
    skills and parts required to maintain these are becoming rare, but for
    those with the time, money and interest, this isn't a problem. People
    can be quite innovative at keeping things going, if they are motivated
    enough. But for the general population, very little will be used by
    future generations, and certainly not every day.

    I suppose some people will even wax lyrical about the unique quality
    that VHS adds to viewing video in a few decades time :)

    There is a thriving market in tech collectables - not just PCs, but also
    things like early transistor radios, calculators, small appliances and
    so on. Some of the more unusual or unsuccessful products (like some
    PDAs) are starting to become valuable.

    Some tech books are already collectable - I've bought two copies of
    "Computer Lib/Dream Machines" (by Ted Nelson) at book fairs in the past
    few years; it is usually totally disregarded by people browsing the
    computer book sections. My copies are valued at about US$125 and US$400
    secondhand on Amazon :)
     
    -=rjh=-, Oct 23, 2005
    #6
  7. Robert Cooze

    Stu Fleming Guest

    Robert Cooze wrote:

    > So the question is what do you use today that might be used by your
    > grandchildren.
    >


    Lego.
     
    Stu Fleming, Oct 23, 2005
    #7
  8. "Robert Cooze" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Today I am looking at my living room and I have the stuff from dead
    > relations. Its my grandfathers clock and some other stuff. In there day
    > they were the hiteck stuff like our computers and such. After a clean out
    > the clock keeps good time and does what it was made to do. I also have
    > both watches from both grandfathers both work and can be used at the drop
    > of a hat.
    > Now my first watch that I used for day to day uce does not work any more
    > and will not ever go. The watch I am using now will never be like the
    > grandfather clock when my child has kids that are my age my stuff will
    > just be technolagl junk, with some family ties but my grandfather's clock
    > will still be working even the watches.
    > I serverly doubt that anything we use today will even be remotely usfule
    > in the years to come my dads first 386 does not function any more I sold
    > my second and third computers many moons ago, and five and six have been
    > junked. My film camera may be still working (if the electronics survive)
    > but my new digital camera properly wont work past it's year five or six if
    > it has not been replaced before then.
    > So the question is what do you use today that might be used by your
    > grandchildren.
    >
    > --
    > http://cooze.co.nz home of the RecyclerMan aka Robert Cooze
    >
    > / __/ / / / / /__ / / ___/ / __/ / / / |/ / /__ /
    > / / / /_/ / / /_/ / _-' / __/ / / / /_/ / / /| / _-'
    > ___\ ____/ ____/ /___/ /____/ /_/ ___\ ____/ /_/ /_/ |_/ /___/


    my bedside alarm clock still goes and that is 17 years old - a little
    battery operated sony where the alarm starts very low volume and increases
    in volume slowly. I replace the AA once every 2 years or so and this thing
    has been round the world many times. To humid and very cold places. It got
    quite dirty so I cleaned it last year and it is good as new if a little
    sunfaded.
     
    news.xtra.co.nz, Oct 24, 2005
    #8
  9. Robert Cooze

    bob Guest

    Anything that has a single function and does it well and is made
    durable.

    metal ruler
    quality parker type pen
    calculator
    sissors
    sewing kit
    rings

    its hard thinking of things youre right !!!

    The world economy wouldnt survive or be where
    it is now if it wasn't for limited life of goods.
     
    bob, Oct 24, 2005
    #9
  10. Robert Cooze

    Philip Guest

    thingy wrote:
    > Robert Cooze wrote:
    >
    >> Today I am looking at my living room and I have the stuff from dead
    >> relations. Its my grandfathers clock and some other stuff. In there
    >> day they were the hiteck stuff like our computers and such. After a
    >> clean out the clock keeps good time and does what it was made to do. I
    >> also have both watches from both grandfathers both work and can be
    >> used at the drop of a hat.
    >> Now my first watch that I used for day to day uce does not work any
    >> more and will not ever go. The watch I am using now will never be like
    >> the grandfather clock when my child has kids that are my age my stuff
    >> will just be technolagl junk, with some family ties but my
    >> grandfather's clock will still be working even the watches.
    >> I serverly doubt that anything we use today will even be remotely
    >> usfule in the years to come my dads first 386 does not function any
    >> more I sold my second and third computers many moons ago, and five and
    >> six have been junked. My film camera may be still working (if the
    >> electronics survive) but my new digital camera properly wont work past
    >> it's year five or six if it has not been replaced before then.
    >> So the question is what do you use today that might be used by your
    >> grandchildren.
    >>

    >
    > Yes I wonder, my Grandparents clock was stuffed so it was dumped but I
    > told my mum to keep their china dogs, which I want when she passes
    > away....(best place for them is with her....young kids and toddlers is
    > not a survival environment for large china victorian dogs....)
    >
    > My son plays with my grandads old pocket watch (busted anyway) and their
    > clockwork alarm clock, he thinks it fun to wind it up.....
    >
    > About the only thing of real value I can see leaving them and hence
    > thier grandchildren is the house....should be here 40~50 years from
    > now....Possibly my old audi quattro, if they can still get petrol 97
    > octane....


    I wonder what the fuel of the day will be fifty years on?

    My Merc will no doubt be off the road, perhaps preserved in a museum and
    fired up on high days and holy days, like a Stanley Steamer. People will
    look in amazement at the way we all rode around in big heavy cars with
    gas-guzzling motors.

    The Merc in question (1997 C280) does have an on-board computer, whih
    helps it achieve better economy and much better performance and handling
    that almost any popular family car from the 70s, many from the 80s, and
    some from the early 90s. It's also fun to drive and pleasing to own, and
    looks good.

    But fifty years on, which car companies will still be there? And what
    will they be selling us?

    Philip
     
    Philip, Oct 24, 2005
    #10
  11. Robert Cooze

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Robert Cooze wrote:
    > Today I am looking at my living room and I have the stuff from dead
    > relations. Its my grandfathers clock and some other stuff. In there
    > day they were the hiteck stuff like our computers and such. After a
    > clean out the clock keeps good time and does what it was made to do.
    > I also have both watches from both grandfathers both work and can be
    > used at the drop of a hat.
    > Now my first watch that I used for day to day uce does not work any
    > more and will not ever go. The watch I am using now will never be
    > like the grandfather clock when my child has kids that are my age my
    > stuff will just be technolagl junk, with some family ties but my
    > grandfather's clock will still be working even the watches.
    > I serverly doubt that anything we use today will even be remotely
    > usfule in the years to come my dads first 386 does not function any
    > more I sold my second and third computers many moons ago, and five
    > and six have been junked. My film camera may be still working (if
    > the electronics survive) but my new digital camera properly wont work
    > past it's year five or six if it has not been replaced before then.
    > So the question is what do you use today that might be used by your
    > grandchildren.


    I inherited my grandfather's claw hammer years ago. My father had used it
    most of his life and had to replace the wooden handle (much to my
    grandfather's annoyance, he still owned it then) in the late 1940's. I, too,
    broke the handle when my father owned it, probably mid 70's, and took the
    time to find a nice hickory handle to replace it with. Then some bastard
    stole it about 10 years ago.

    This thread reminds me of the watch from Pulp Fiction.
    --
    ~misfit~
     
    ~misfit~, Oct 24, 2005
    #11
  12. Robert Cooze

    ~misfit~ Guest

    bob wrote:
    > Anything that has a single function and does it well and is made
    > durable.
    >
    > metal ruler
    > quality parker type pen
    > calculator
    > sissors
    > sewing kit
    > rings
    >
    > its hard thinking of things youre right !!!
    >
    > The world economy wouldnt survive or be where
    > it is now if it wasn't for limited life of goods.


    I have a pair of scissors that are over 100 years old. Made by Lockwood
    brothers, Sheffield:

    http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/misfit61nz/detail?.dir=eefd&.dnm=9d25.jpg&.src=ph
    --
    ~misfit~
     
    ~misfit~, Oct 24, 2005
    #12
  13. Robert Cooze

    Richard Guest

    Robert Cooze wrote:
    > Today I am looking at my living room and I have the stuff from dead
    > relations. Its my grandfathers clock and some other stuff. In there day
    > they were the hiteck stuff like our computers and such. After a clean
    > out the clock keeps good time and does what it was made to do. I also
    > have both watches from both grandfathers both work and can be used at
    > the drop of a hat.
    > Now my first watch that I used for day to day uce does not work any more
    > and will not ever go. The watch I am using now will never be like the
    > grandfather clock when my child has kids that are my age my stuff will
    > just be technolagl junk, with some family ties but my grandfather's
    > clock will still be working even the watches.
    > I serverly doubt that anything we use today will even be remotely usfule
    > in the years to come my dads first 386 does not function any more I sold
    > my second and third computers many moons ago, and five and six have been
    > junked. My film camera may be still working (if the electronics
    > survive) but my new digital camera properly wont work past it's year
    > five or six if it has not been replaced before then.
    > So the question is what do you use today that might be used by your
    > grandchildren.


    Because you are buying cheap stuff

    The inherited watch would have being a good portion of a years salary back when
    it was new, so instead of looking at cheap watches these days and how they will
    survive, look at some good ones. A rolex will still be good in 30-40 years time,
    not so a casio gshock
     
    Richard, Oct 24, 2005
    #13
  14. Robert Cooze

    steve Guest

    Robert Cooze wrote:


    > So the question is what do you use today that might be used by your
    > grandchildren.


    Data... :)
     
    steve, Oct 24, 2005
    #14
  15. Robert Cooze

    Ross Guest

    On Mon, 24 Oct 2005 07:12:31 +1300, Robert Cooze
    <> wrote:

    >So the question is what do you use today that might be used by your
    >grandchildren.


    My slide-rule and log book from the 1970s could come in handy when/if
    the big EMP thing happens!
     
    Ross, Oct 24, 2005
    #15
  16. Robert Cooze

    Robert Cooze Guest

    steve wrote:
    > Robert Cooze wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >>So the question is what do you use today that might be used by your
    >>grandchildren.

    >
    >
    > Data... :)
    >
    >
    >

    Hopefuly the data that I have backed up and freshened (put on new media)
    should still be readable I keep good catalogs of where and what there is
    only 400Mb of text that is important and arround 1.5 gig of photos at
    the moment but in the process of arciving my negitives (they will still
    be arround) but I agree a lot may not be of any uce or intrest with out
    the storys behind the photos.

    --
    http://cooze.co.nz home of the RecyclerMan aka Robert Cooze

    / __/ / / / / /__ / / ___/ / __/ / / / |/ / /__ /
    / / / /_/ / / /_/ / _-' / __/ / / / /_/ / / /| / _-'
    ___\ ____/ ____/ /___/ /____/ /_/ ___\ ____/ /_/ /_/ |_/ /___/
     
    Robert Cooze, Oct 24, 2005
    #16
  17. Robert Cooze

    Robert Cooze Guest

    Ross wrote:
    > On Mon, 24 Oct 2005 07:12:31 +1300, Robert Cooze
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>So the question is what do you use today that might be used by your
    >>grandchildren.

    >
    >
    > My slide-rule and log book from the 1970s could come in handy when/if
    > the big EMP thing happens!
    >

    Yup I keep those in place I showed a current generation math teacher (in
    early 20's age) the fact I rembered pi and knew where and when to round
    to keep the equasion managibal I out preformed the caculator they where
    using and the answer was just as correct in a real world setting.

    --
    http://cooze.co.nz home of the RecyclerMan aka Robert Cooze

    / __/ / / / / /__ / / ___/ / __/ / / / |/ / /__ /
    / / / /_/ / / /_/ / _-' / __/ / / / /_/ / / /| / _-'
    ___\ ____/ ____/ /___/ /____/ /_/ ___\ ____/ /_/ /_/ |_/ /___/
     
    Robert Cooze, Oct 24, 2005
    #17
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