to partition or not to partition

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by SirReal, Jun 29, 2005.

  1. SirReal

    SirReal Guest

    i have gained a 80 gig external drive (iomege USB 2.0)

    what are the benefits/problems of partioning this drive into
    virtual drives?? no more than 3. would it cause too much slack space??
    hard or soft?? please advise.

    thanks in advance...
     
    SirReal, Jun 29, 2005
    #1
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  2. SirReal wrote:
    > i have gained a 80 gig external drive (iomege USB 2.0)
    >
    > what are the benefits/problems of partioning this drive into
    > virtual drives?? no more than 3. would it cause too much slack space??
    > hard or soft?? please advise.
    >
    > thanks in advance...


    Since it's not your boot drive, you should ask what are the advantages
    of partitioning. If it were me, one big open space is what I'd prefer.
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=, Jun 29, 2005
    #2
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  3. SirReal wrote:

    > i have gained a 80 gig external drive (iomege USB 2.0)
    >
    > what are the benefits/problems of partioning this drive into
    > virtual drives?? no more than 3. would it cause too much slack space??
    > hard or soft?? please advise.
    >

    "Hard partitioning" would require an axe or some other sharp tool, and I
    don't recommend it due to integrity concerns :=)
    Now, depending upon the size of your drive, your OS or the OSs you want to
    try out later on, it's amost always a good idea. I would take (assume you
    use XPsomething) 20 GB as C: for system+programs, another partition of your
    choice for "Documents and settings"+your favorite music/whataver files
    (right-click on the link symbol, chose properties and "redirect" to D: or
    whatever your extra partition is) - and maybe leave a free space at the end
    of your harddrive, 10GB will suffice for first, to try out other operating
    systems like linux later.
    Before you install any programs, set up your swap file to a constant size -
    minimum=maximum value - so it won't fragment any more. It is not adviseable
    to move it to another partition unless that partition resides on a 2nd
    harddrive _and_ on the other ide channel.

    --
    Longhorn error#4711: TCPA / NGSCP VIOLATION: Microsoft optical mouse
    detected penguin patterns on mousepad. Partition scan in progress
     to remove offending incompatible products.  Reactivate MS software.
    Linux woodpecker.homnet.at 2.6.12-mm2[LinuxCounter#295241,ICQ#4918962]
     
    Walter Mautner, Jun 29, 2005
    #3
  4. If you are using the NTFS file system then from 2Gb to 2 Tb you will
    have a 4Kb cluster size so you would get no advantage with regards to
    slack space. If you are using FAT32 then 16Kb clusters up to 32Gb then
    32Kb clusters above this so yes, savings in slack space. So all-in-all
    NTFS is the most economical.

    Defragmentation times will be less with smaller partitions so you would
    pick up a time saving with the smaller logical drives.

    Look at you hard drive as a filing cabinet, the additional logical
    drives would enable you to organise your data more efficiently eg one
    drive could be devoted to photos, one to financial matters and one to
    archived material and so on, but don't get carried away and end up with
    too many partitions or you will lose the possible advantages by not
    knowing which "draw" you have saved your data etc.

    The choice is yours and depends on how you want to organise your data.
     
    GreenieLeBrun, Jun 29, 2005
    #4
  5. SirReal

    SirReal Guest


    > The choice is yours and depends on how you want to organise your data.


    ....thank you for the info. i appreciate your integrity.

    peace
     
    SirReal, Jun 29, 2005
    #5
  6. SirReal

    Gort Guest

    SirReal wrote:
    > i have gained a 80 gig external drive (iomege USB 2.0)
    >
    > what are the benefits/problems of partioning this drive into
    > virtual drives?? no more than 3. would it cause too much slack space??
    > hard or soft?? please advise.
    >
    > thanks in advance...
    >
    >


    That depends on what use you'll make of each partition.
    One large one makes defragging and virus scans take longer.
    With multiple partitions you can exclude them if they're only used for
    storage, for example.
    If, however, everything doesn't get automatically scanned when received
    it's probably best to just have one that does.



    --
    If you find a posting or message from myself offensive,
    inappropriate, or disruptive, please ignore it. If you don't know
    how to ignore a posting,complain to me and I will demonstrate.
     
    Gort, Jun 30, 2005
    #6
  7. SirReal

    Guest

    I can now see 3 benefits of NTFS:
    1) Economy in disk space
    2) Files over 4 gig
    3) Security
    Are there any others please?

    FAT Guy
     
    , Jul 4, 2005
    #7
  8. SirReal

    Toolman Tim Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I can now see 3 benefits of NTFS:
    > 1) Economy in disk space
    > 2) Files over 4 gig
    > 3) Security
    > Are there any others please?


    Reliability - more redundancy and better chances of recovery from a crash
    (i.e., power outage, non-hard drive hardware failure, etc..)
     
    Toolman Tim, Jul 4, 2005
    #8
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