Tipping Point Ahead

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Have A Nice Cup of Tea, Jun 3, 2006.

  1. http://www.linuxtoday.com/developer/2006060202826OPMRDV

    "" According to survey, by the end of the year, it is expected that the
    number of developers expected to be working on Linux will match the number
    of expected Windows developers. ... the trend is showing a strong growth
    of Linux developers, and sometime in the near future, their numbers will
    pass those of Windows. When that happens, a lot more applications and
    solutions are going to find their way to Linux.

    "Watching the developers is like watching the future," Handy told me. If
    so, then the future's looking mighty good for Linux. ""


    Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    --
    1/ Migration to Linux only costs money once. Higher Windows TCO is forever.
    2/ "Shared source" is a poison pill. Open Source is freedom.
    3/ Only the Windows boxes get the worms.
     
    Have A Nice Cup of Tea, Jun 3, 2006
    #1
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  2. Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    Fred Dagg Guest

    On Sat, 03 Jun 2006 23:50:56 +1200, Have A Nice Cup of Tea <>
    exclaimed:

    >http://www.linuxtoday.com/developer/2006060202826OPMRDV
    >
    >"" According to survey, by the end of the year, it is expected that the
    >number of developers expected to be working on Linux will match the number
    >of expected Windows developers. ... the trend is showing a strong growth
    >of Linux developers, and sometime in the near future, their numbers will
    >pass those of Windows. When that happens, a lot more applications and
    >solutions are going to find their way to Linux.
    >
    >"Watching the developers is like watching the future," Handy told me. If
    >so, then the future's looking mighty good for Linux. ""
    >


    LOL!! Thanks for the laugh!
     
    Fred Dagg, Jun 3, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    thingy Guest

    Fred Dagg wrote:
    > On Sat, 03 Jun 2006 23:50:56 +1200, Have A Nice Cup of Tea <>
    > exclaimed:
    >
    >
    >>http://www.linuxtoday.com/developer/2006060202826OPMRDV
    >>
    >>"" According to survey, by the end of the year, it is expected that the
    >>number of developers expected to be working on Linux will match the number
    >>of expected Windows developers. ... the trend is showing a strong growth
    >>of Linux developers, and sometime in the near future, their numbers will
    >>pass those of Windows. When that happens, a lot more applications and
    >>solutions are going to find their way to Linux.
    >>
    >>"Watching the developers is like watching the future," Handy told me. If
    >>so, then the future's looking mighty good for Linux. ""
    >>

    >
    >
    > LOL!! Thanks for the laugh!


    You are a fool, and as the saying goes never agure with one, people may
    not know the difference.

    regards

    thing
     
    thingy, Jun 4, 2006
    #3
  4. Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    Fred Dagg Guest

    On Sun, 04 Jun 2006 11:27:20 +1200, thingy <>
    exclaimed:

    >Fred Dagg wrote:
    >> On Sat, 03 Jun 2006 23:50:56 +1200, Have A Nice Cup of Tea <>
    >> exclaimed:
    >>
    >>
    >>>http://www.linuxtoday.com/developer/2006060202826OPMRDV
    >>>
    >>>"" According to survey, by the end of the year, it is expected that the
    >>>number of developers expected to be working on Linux will match the number
    >>>of expected Windows developers. ... the trend is showing a strong growth
    >>>of Linux developers, and sometime in the near future, their numbers will
    >>>pass those of Windows. When that happens, a lot more applications and
    >>>solutions are going to find their way to Linux.
    >>>
    >>>"Watching the developers is like watching the future," Handy told me. If
    >>>so, then the future's looking mighty good for Linux. ""
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> LOL!! Thanks for the laugh!

    >
    >You are a fool, and as the saying goes never agure with one, people may
    >not know the difference.


    Oh come on, thingy. Do you honestly believe that there will be the
    same number of Linux developers as Windows developers by the end of
    the year? That's just crazy talk.

    Sure, Linux has it's uses (contrary to what you might believe, I use
    it reasonably extensively - right tool for the job and all that).
    Sure, Linux use is slowly growing. But to say that Linux developers
    will overtake Windows developers this year?

    That's dreamland stuff - totally laughable.
     
    Fred Dagg, Jun 4, 2006
    #4
  5. Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    ChrisB Guest

    Fred Dagg wrote:
    > On Sat, 03 Jun 2006 23:50:56 +1200, Have A Nice Cup of Tea <>
    > exclaimed:
    >
    >> http://www.linuxtoday.com/developer/2006060202826OPMRDV
    >>
    >> "" According to survey, by the end of the year, it is expected that the
    >> number of developers expected to be working on Linux will match the number
    >> of expected Windows developers. ... the trend is showing a strong growth
    >> of Linux developers, and sometime in the near future, their numbers will
    >> pass those of Windows. When that happens, a lot more applications and
    >> solutions are going to find their way to Linux.
    >>
    >> "Watching the developers is like watching the future," Handy told me. If
    >> so, then the future's looking mighty good for Linux. ""
    >>

    >
    > LOL!! Thanks for the laugh!


    Disclaimer: Fred Dagg has shares in microsoft

    Or even funnier - has been sucked in to the MCSE et al scam! hahahaha
     
    ChrisB, Jun 4, 2006
    #5
  6. Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    Allistar Guest

    Fred Dagg wrote:

    > On Sun, 04 Jun 2006 11:27:20 +1200, thingy <>
    > exclaimed:
    >
    >>Fred Dagg wrote:
    >>> On Sat, 03 Jun 2006 23:50:56 +1200, Have A Nice Cup of Tea <>
    >>> exclaimed:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>http://www.linuxtoday.com/developer/2006060202826OPMRDV
    >>>>
    >>>>"" According to survey, by the end of the year, it is expected that the
    >>>>number of developers expected to be working on Linux will match the
    >>>>number of expected Windows developers. ... the trend is showing a strong
    >>>>growth of Linux developers, and sometime in the near future, their
    >>>>numbers will pass those of Windows. When that happens, a lot more
    >>>>applications and solutions are going to find their way to Linux.
    >>>>
    >>>>"Watching the developers is like watching the future," Handy told me. If
    >>>>so, then the future's looking mighty good for Linux. ""
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> LOL!! Thanks for the laugh!

    >>
    >>You are a fool, and as the saying goes never agure with one, people may
    >>not know the difference.

    >
    > Oh come on, thingy. Do you honestly believe that there will be the
    > same number of Linux developers as Windows developers by the end of
    > the year? That's just crazy talk.
    >
    > Sure, Linux has it's uses (contrary to what you might believe, I use
    > it reasonably extensively - right tool for the job and all that).
    > Sure, Linux use is slowly growing. But to say that Linux developers
    > will overtake Windows developers this year?
    >
    > That's dreamland stuff - totally laughable.


    It depends who you're counting. The majority of Windows developers (i.e.
    those developing the Windows operating systems) would be in Redmond,
    surely. Those contributing to the Linux kernel are all over the place. I
    suppose it depends on what you classify as "Linux". Just the kernel, or
    user space applications too?

    Allistar.
     
    Allistar, Jun 4, 2006
    #6
  7. Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    thingy Guest

    Fred Dagg wrote:
    > On Sun, 04 Jun 2006 11:27:20 +1200, thingy <>
    > exclaimed:
    >
    >
    >>Fred Dagg wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Sat, 03 Jun 2006 23:50:56 +1200, Have A Nice Cup of Tea <>
    >>>exclaimed:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>http://www.linuxtoday.com/developer/2006060202826OPMRDV
    >>>>
    >>>>"" According to survey, by the end of the year, it is expected that the
    >>>>number of developers expected to be working on Linux will match the number
    >>>>of expected Windows developers. ... the trend is showing a strong growth
    >>>>of Linux developers, and sometime in the near future, their numbers will
    >>>>pass those of Windows. When that happens, a lot more applications and
    >>>>solutions are going to find their way to Linux.
    >>>>
    >>>>"Watching the developers is like watching the future," Handy told me. If
    >>>>so, then the future's looking mighty good for Linux. ""
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>LOL!! Thanks for the laugh!

    >>
    >>You are a fool, and as the saying goes never agure with one, people may
    >>not know the difference.

    >
    >
    > Oh come on, thingy. Do you honestly believe that there will be the
    > same number of Linux developers as Windows developers by the end of
    > the year? That's just crazy talk.
    >
    > Sure, Linux has it's uses (contrary to what you might believe, I use
    > it reasonably extensively - right tool for the job and all that).
    > Sure, Linux use is slowly growing. But to say that Linux developers
    > will overtake Windows developers this year?
    >
    > That's dreamland stuff - totally laughable.


    Spring 2006 North American Developer's Survey from Evans Data

    "You read that right. The expected development targets for
    developers--from an independent survey--will be 50% for Linux and 50% of
    Windows by the end of 2006."

    8><----

    "Handy believes that by this time next year, we will be seeing more
    Linux developers than Windows developers."

    8><------

    "And if you think that doesn't scare the willies out of Bill Gates and
    Steve Ballmer, think again. Handy related to me that in the 2001 edition
    of the same survey, Linux developers surpassed the number of Solaris
    developers. About five months later, in Feb. 2002, we saw Sun
    Microsystems' then-CEO Scott McNealy waddled out to an audience at a Sun
    conference in a penguin suit. "

    You can carry on with your head stuck in the sand, or you can understand
    the paradigm shift happening and come up wiht a strategy to cope, it is
    your choice.

    regards

    Thing
     
    thingy, Jun 4, 2006
    #7
  8. On Sun, 04 Jun 2006 22:11:56 +1200, thingy wrote:

    > You can carry on with your head stuck in the sand, or you can understand
    > the paradigm shift happening and come up wiht a strategy to cope, it is
    > your choice.


    I reckon this is why Bill Gates has been gradually selling his stock in
    Micro$oft; and also why Micro$oft is now supporting Linux in it's
    Virtualisation package (sorry - can't recall what it's called); and is
    also why Micro$oft is trying oh so hard to make Vi$ta the best it can be -
    even tho' it's going to have seriously unpopular DRM shite built into it!

    The person is insane who chooses to actually pay money for any so-called
    "new" software from Micro$oft.
    Micro$oft Office has been around since January 1989 - that's Seventeen
    years - and the individual programs that constitute M$ office were already
    reasonably mature even then.

    There is no way that a seventeen year old office suite can be described as
    "a new solution"!

    I also think that after seventeen years M$ should have sorted out all the
    security flaws by now
    ..

    Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    --
    1/ Migration to Linux only costs money once. Higher Windows TCO is forever.
    2/ "Shared source" is a poison pill. Open Source is freedom.
    3/ Only the Windows boxes get the worms.
     
    Have A Nice Cup of Tea, Jun 4, 2006
    #8
  9. Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    Jedmeister Guest

    Have A Nice Cup of Tea wrote:
    > http://www.linuxtoday.com/developer/2006060202826OPMRDV
    >
    > "" According to survey, by the end of the year, it is expected that the
    > number of developers expected to be working on Linux will match the number
    > of expected Windows developers. ...


    Too many cooks will spoil the broth.

    These linux developers will all want to do their own thing. Who takes
    executive control of linux ? Isn't having multiple versions of the
    core OS code a bad thing?

    Change control is surely linuxes biggest issue?
     
    Jedmeister, Jun 5, 2006
    #9
  10. Hi there,

    Fred Dagg wrote:
    > On Sun, 04 Jun 2006 11:27:20 +1200, thingy <>
    > exclaimed:
    >
    >>Fred Dagg wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Sat, 03 Jun 2006 23:50:56 +1200, Have A Nice Cup of Tea <>
    >>>exclaimed:
    >>>
    >>>>http://www.linuxtoday.com/developer/2006060202826OPMRDV
    >>>>
    >>>>"" According to survey, by the end of the year, it is expected that the
    >>>>number of developers expected to be working on Linux will match the number
    >>>>of expected Windows developers. ... the trend is showing a strong growth
    >>>>of Linux developers, and sometime in the near future, their numbers will
    >>>>pass those of Windows. When that happens, a lot more applications and
    >>>>solutions are going to find their way to Linux.
    >>>>
    >>>>"Watching the developers is like watching the future," Handy told me. If
    >>>>so, then the future's looking mighty good for Linux. ""
    >>>
    >>>LOL!! Thanks for the laugh!

    >>
    >>You are a fool, and as the saying goes never agure with one, people may
    >>not know the difference.

    >
    > Oh come on, thingy. Do you honestly believe that there will be the
    > same number of Linux developers as Windows developers by the end of
    > the year? That's just crazy talk.
    >
    > Sure, Linux has it's uses (contrary to what you might believe, I use
    > it reasonably extensively - right tool for the job and all that).
    > Sure, Linux use is slowly growing. But to say that Linux developers
    > will overtake Windows developers this year?
    >
    > That's dreamland stuff - totally laughable.


    You're often quick to take a dig at Linux and OSS, claiming its
    only good for commies, yet here you 'fess up to using it, using
    the term 'reasonably extensively'...

    Could you be more of a hypocrit?

    --
    Kind regards,

    Chris Wilkinson, Brisbane, Australia.
    Anyone wishing to email me directly can remove the obvious
    spamblocker, and replace it with t p g <dot> c o m <dot> a u
     
    Chris Wilkinson, Jun 6, 2006
    #10
  11. On Mon, 05 Jun 2006 13:47:19 -0700, Jedmeister wrote:

    > These linux developers will all want to do their own thing. Who takes
    > executive control of linux ? Isn't having multiple versions of the
    > core OS code a bad thing?


    There is only one version of Linux - that which is approved by Linus
    Torvolds.


    Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    --
    1/ Migration to Linux only costs money once. Higher Windows TCO is forever.
    2/ "Shared source" is a poison pill. Open Source is freedom.
    3/ Only the Windows boxes get the worms.
     
    Have A Nice Cup of Tea, Jun 6, 2006
    #11
  12. Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    Fred Dagg Guest

    On Tue, 06 Jun 2006 10:05:33 +1000, Chris Wilkinson
    <> exclaimed:

    >> Sure, Linux has it's uses (contrary to what you might believe, I use
    >> it reasonably extensively - right tool for the job and all that).
    >> Sure, Linux use is slowly growing. But to say that Linux developers
    >> will overtake Windows developers this year?
    >>
    >> That's dreamland stuff - totally laughable.

    >
    >You're often quick to take a dig at Linux and OSS, claiming its
    >only good for commies, yet here you 'fess up to using it, using
    >the term 'reasonably extensively'...
    >

    Absolutely not. To my knowledge, I've never said it's "only good for
    commies".

    What I HAVE said is Linux advocates who blindly spout on about their
    operating system, while totally ignoring the fact that others are
    better at many tasks (just like theirs is better at some tasks) are
    akin to commies.
     
    Fred Dagg, Jun 6, 2006
    #12
  13. Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    Fred Dagg Guest

    On Sun, 04 Jun 2006 16:51:34 +1200, Allistar <> exclaimed:

    >>>>>http://www.linuxtoday.com/developer/2006060202826OPMRDV
    >>>>>
    >>>>>"" According to survey, by the end of the year, it is expected that the
    >>>>>number of developers expected to be working on Linux will match the
    >>>>>number of expected Windows developers. ... the trend is showing a strong
    >>>>>growth of Linux developers, and sometime in the near future, their
    >>>>>numbers will pass those of Windows. When that happens, a lot more
    >>>>>applications and solutions are going to find their way to Linux.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>"Watching the developers is like watching the future," Handy told me. If
    >>>>>so, then the future's looking mighty good for Linux. ""
    >>>>
    >>>> LOL!! Thanks for the laugh!
    >>>
    >>>You are a fool, and as the saying goes never agure with one, people may
    >>>not know the difference.

    >>
    >> Oh come on, thingy. Do you honestly believe that there will be the
    >> same number of Linux developers as Windows developers by the end of
    >> the year? That's just crazy talk.
    >>
    >> Sure, Linux has it's uses (contrary to what you might believe, I use
    >> it reasonably extensively - right tool for the job and all that).
    >> Sure, Linux use is slowly growing. But to say that Linux developers
    >> will overtake Windows developers this year?
    >>
    >> That's dreamland stuff - totally laughable.

    >
    >It depends who you're counting. The majority of Windows developers (i.e.
    >those developing the Windows operating systems) would be in Redmond,
    >surely. Those contributing to the Linux kernel are all over the place. I
    >suppose it depends on what you classify as "Linux". Just the kernel, or
    >user space applications too?


    I read "Windows Developers" to mean those developing for the Windows
    platform, and "Linux Developers" to mean those developing applications
    for the Linux platforms.
     
    Fred Dagg, Jun 6, 2006
    #13
  14. Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    impossible Guest

    "Have A Nice Cup of Tea" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > On Mon, 05 Jun 2006 13:47:19 -0700, Jedmeister wrote:
    >
    >> These linux developers will all want to do their own thing. Who
    >> takes
    >> executive control of linux ? Isn't having multiple versions of the
    >> core OS code a bad thing?

    >
    > There is only one version of Linux - that which is approved by Linus
    > Torvolds.
    >
    >


    Kind of puts a dent in your "tipping point" theory. Linux development
    is more an amateur sport than a professional occupation. For every
    person who actually sends something useful to Torvald, you have 10,000
    fanboy tinkerers running around chanting "Freedom!" Hence the dearth
    of first-class professional applications for the Linux OS.
     
    impossible, Jun 6, 2006
    #14
  15. Hi there,

    Fred Dagg wrote:
    > On Tue, 06 Jun 2006 10:05:33 +1000, Chris Wilkinson
    > <> exclaimed:
    >
    >
    >>>Sure, Linux has it's uses (contrary to what you might believe, I use
    >>>it reasonably extensively - right tool for the job and all that).
    >>>Sure, Linux use is slowly growing. But to say that Linux developers
    >>>will overtake Windows developers this year?
    >>>
    >>>That's dreamland stuff - totally laughable.

    >>
    >>You're often quick to take a dig at Linux and OSS, claiming its
    >>only good for commies, yet here you 'fess up to using it, using
    >>the term 'reasonably extensively'...
    >>

    >
    > Absolutely not. To my knowledge, I've never said it's "only good for
    > commies".
    >
    > What I HAVE said is Linux advocates who blindly spout on about their
    > operating system, while totally ignoring the fact that others are
    > better at many tasks (just like theirs is better at some tasks) are
    > akin to commies.


    Quote:

    "The communist countries have always been very keen on Linux, and vice
    versa. They can keep it."

    Did you write that? Seems you need to elaborate more. If Linux is such
    a socialist plug why do you use it? Again, you're a hypocrit...

    --
    Kind regards,

    Chris Wilkinson, Brisbane, Australia.
    Anyone wishing to email me directly can remove the obvious
    spamblocker, and replace it with t p g <dot> c o m <dot> a u
     
    Chris Wilkinson, Jun 7, 2006
    #15
  16. On Tue, 06 Jun 2006 18:39:34 -0400, impossible wrote:

    > Hence the dearth
    > of first-class professional applications for the Linux OS.


    LOL!

    Says the fulla who uses Micro$oft Outlook Express!

    The more I see of the problems people get with Outlook the more I feel
    confirmed that it is a steaming pile of shite.

    Software should be well thought out, easy to drive, and reliable.

    Outlook is none of the above.

    You shouldn't have to dig 4-5 layers deep into a GUI in order to make a
    simple change to configuration files for an email account.


    Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    --
    1/ Migration to Linux only costs money once. Higher Windows TCO is forever.
    2/ "Shared source" is a poison pill. Open Source is freedom.
    3/ Only the Windows boxes get the worms.
     
    Have A Nice Cup of Tea, Jun 7, 2006
    #16
  17. Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    Jasen Betts Guest

    On 2006-06-05, Jedmeister <> wrote:
    > Have A Nice Cup of Tea wrote:
    >> http://www.linuxtoday.com/developer/2006060202826OPMRDV
    >>
    >> "" According to survey, by the end of the year, it is expected that the
    >> number of developers expected to be working on Linux will match the number
    >> of expected Windows developers. ...

    >
    > Too many cooks will spoil the broth.


    many hand make light work

    > These linux developers will all want to do their own thing.


    Vive Le Difference!

    > Who takes executive control of linux ?


    Linus Torvalds.

    > Isn't having multiple versions of the core OS code a bad thing?


    No, why would it be?

    > Change control is surely linuxes biggest issue?


    That's why versions are numbered.

    Bye.
    Jasen
     
    Jasen Betts, Jun 7, 2006
    #17
  18. Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    Peter Nield Guest

    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "Have A Nice Cup of Tea" <>
    Newsgroups: nz.comp
    Sent: Tuesday, June 06, 2006 6:57 PM
    Subject: Re: Tipping Point Ahead


    > On Mon, 05 Jun 2006 13:47:19 -0700, Jedmeister wrote:
    >
    > > These linux developers will all want to do their own thing. Who takes
    > > executive control of linux ? Isn't having multiple versions of the
    > > core OS code a bad thing?

    >
    > There is only one version of Linux - that which is approved by Linus
    > Torvolds.
    >
    >
    > Have A Nice Cup of Tea



    Cuppa, At best that's a very poor generalisation, .

    There is one "branch" of the Linux Kernal that is maintained by Linus
    Torvolds.

    There have been many versions of that branch along the way - from the very
    first alpha Linus released to the current version (which escapes me at the
    moment)

    Since it is licensed under the GPL, it is possible there are many forks from
    the various versions available from that one branch. Whether or not a given
    fork continues to be supported is up to the maintainer of that branch.
    Sometimes code from newer versions get back-ported to forks from older
    versions. Sometimes code from a fork is ported to the main branch.

    Surrounding the kernal are all of the utilities, compilers and applications
    that are assembled together into a distribtion, which are either specific
    use (e.g. Knoppmyth) or more general (Unbutu, Suse, Mandriva, to some extent
    Linspire, Fedora Core), or targetted to a server evnironment (e.g. Red Hat
    Enterprise). Each of these is maintained by its distributor. Support for
    those distributions come from the maintainer. The support costs time and
    money to supply. That time and money has to come from somewhere. Hence
    paid-for support agreements (e.g. RHE).

    If you build an application, regardless of the environment it runs in, it's
    up to you to maintain it.

    If you pay someone else to write an application, regardless of the
    environment it runs in, it's up to you to make arrangements to have it
    maintained. (check the warrantee all applications have in the EULA - "not
    intended for any particular purpose" etc).

    By itself, GPL code is put out as "here's something I've written that I find
    useful. Do with it what you will so long as 1) you ackowledge me as the
    original writer, 2) you make your source available freely also, and 3) No
    support implied". Basically, if you use a GPL'd application, you get to
    maintain it. Or make arrangements to have someone help you with it.

    If you use Linux, you will still need to have System Administrators to
    maintain your system. Those system administrators need access to support
    for the OS and applications. For business critical functions, it would be a
    poor business decision to rely on an OS or application that does not have a
    formal support arrangement with the vendor. Switching from Windows to Linux
    removes the capital outlay required to purchase the OS. But you've still
    got the software deployment cycles to go through, patching to do etc. Those
    costs do not go away, although they may change, possibly down.

    I find some TCO comparisions misleading . Given that once you've made the
    change, you are may be relying on projections for cost estimates for the old
    platform. If the old platform was not being managed properly, perhaps
    fixing that problem would have reduced the costs (I have seen problems like
    this). Also, what business leader in their right mind would let on to a
    competitor that they saved millions from their bottom line? (Mind you, ASB
    did this recently, trumpting moving across to virtualisation to save them a
    packet on server hardware. I suspect they got ESX server for free, and the
    article was a PR piece for VMWare - the usual agreement in these cases)

    Consider a example of two solutions that provide identical functionality.
    If one is cheaper than the other, it probably won't stay that way for long,
    as it's supplier increase the price to reduce demand, or the price of the
    expensive one will come down (i.e. the "monopoly rent" will be removed) -
    look at the price of a home phone line in the Wellington region compared
    with rest of the country.

    Sorry, I'd better stop ranting now. I really don't care what platform
    people use. If it's linux, fine, I probably won't be able to help them if
    things go wrong for them, SEP (Somebody Else's Problem). If it's Windows, I
    have a fair chance of having seen the problem, or be able to nut out how to
    fix it, but still, SEP, unless someone pays me to have it BMP (Be My
    Problem, preferrably known as Be My Opportunity To Make Ends Meet), which is
    often the case for me being an SME for Windows, Active Directory, Exchange,
    ISA, IIS and BizTalk Installation where I work...
     
    Peter Nield, Jun 7, 2006
    #18
  19. On Wed, 07 Jun 2006 22:28:56 +1200, Peter Nield wrote:

    > There is one "branch" of the Linux Kernal that is maintained by Linus
    > Torvolds.


    The "branch" that Linus maintains is in fact the trunk of the development
    tree for Linux.

    If it has not been approved by Linus then it does not get into Linux.

    And yes - anybody is entitled to take that source code and either
    redistribute it, or to modify it in some way or other. In reality Linux
    development is happening in a very orderly and unified way. (that's not
    saying that there are not disagreements on the way)


    Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    --
    1/ Migration to Linux only costs money once. Higher Windows TCO is forever.
    2/ "Shared source" is a poison pill. Open Source is freedom.
    3/ Only the Windows boxes get the worms.
     
    Have A Nice Cup of Tea, Jun 7, 2006
    #19
  20. On Wed, 07 Jun 2006 22:28:56 +1200, Peter Nield wrote:

    > If you use Linux, you will still need to have System Administrators to
    > maintain your system. Those system administrators need access to support
    > for the OS and applications.


    I use Linux. I don't have a "System Administrator". A friend also uses
    Linux. He too doesn't have a "System Administrator".

    But of course you are talking about an enterprise environment which
    employs clueless muppets that think doing the right thing is opening email
    attachments that any normal person would instantly recognise as a virus.

    Even in that environment If they were using Linux-based desktops &
    servers, there would be far fewer problems to sort out., and they would
    not need to employ as many Systems Administrators.


    Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    --
    1/ Migration to Linux only costs money once. Higher Windows TCO is forever.
    2/ "Shared source" is a poison pill. Open Source is freedom.
    3/ Only the Windows boxes get the worms.
     
    Have A Nice Cup of Tea, Jun 7, 2006
    #20
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