Timelapse of table

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Sandman, Nov 19, 2011.

  1. Sandman

    Sandman Guest

    So I want to make a timelapse movie of me drawing, and I will be
    drawing on paper on a table. I have a DSLR and I was wondering if you
    knew about a good way to mount it above the paper?

    I have two tripods and putting them on the table may be a bit
    cumbersome but it's possible, but I don't seem to be able to zoom
    out/move the camera far up enough without seeing the tripod in frame.
    Not a huge problem per se, but I would prefer a mounting solution that
    works without seeing it of course.

    Any ideas?

    --
    Sandman[.net]
    Sandman, Nov 19, 2011
    #1
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  2. Sandman

    Bob Dobbs Guest

    Sandman wrote:
    >So I want to make a timelapse movie of me drawing, and I will be
    >drawing on paper on a table. I have a DSLR and I was wondering if you
    >knew about a good way to mount it above the paper?
    >
    >I have two tripods and putting them on the table may be a bit
    >cumbersome but it's possible, but I don't seem to be able to zoom
    >out/move the camera far up enough without seeing the tripod in frame.
    >Not a huge problem per se, but I would prefer a mounting solution that
    >works without seeing it of course.
    >
    >Any ideas?


    What about using the paper mounted/pinned on the wall as your target?
    --

    http://bit.ly/g2PCII
    Bob Dobbs, Nov 19, 2011
    #2
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  3. Sandman

    Peter Irwin Guest

    Sandman <> wrote:
    > So I want to make a timelapse movie of me drawing, and I will be
    > drawing on paper on a table. I have a DSLR and I was wondering if you
    > knew about a good way to mount it above the paper?
    >
    > I have two tripods and putting them on the table may be a bit
    > cumbersome but it's possible, but I don't seem to be able to zoom
    > out/move the camera far up enough without seeing the tripod in frame.
    > Not a huge problem per se, but I would prefer a mounting solution that
    > works without seeing it of course.
    >
    > Any ideas?


    Do either of your tripods have a reversible column? It is
    a somewhat under-advertised feature of many tripods.

    Sometimes mounting the camera on a reversed column below
    the apex of the tripod can help. Leg shadows can still be
    a big problem though.

    Peter.
    --
    Peter Irwin, Nov 19, 2011
    #3
  4. Sandman

    Nervous Nick Guest

    On Nov 19, 3:51 am, Sandman <> wrote:
    > So I want to make a timelapse movie of me drawing, and I will be
    > drawing on paper on a table. I have a DSLR and I was wondering if you
    > knew about a good way to mount it above the paper?
    >
    > I have two tripods and putting them on the table may be a bit
    > cumbersome but it's possible, but I don't seem to be able to zoom
    > out/move the camera far up enough without seeing the tripod in frame.
    > Not a huge problem per se, but I would prefer a mounting solution that
    > works without seeing it of course.


    Crop the fucking tripods out of the final photo.
    Nervous Nick, Nov 19, 2011
    #4
  5. Sandman

    ray Guest

    On Sat, 19 Nov 2011 10:51:06 +0100, Sandman wrote:

    > So I want to make a timelapse movie of me drawing, and I will be drawing
    > on paper on a table. I have a DSLR and I was wondering if you knew about
    > a good way to mount it above the paper?
    >
    > I have two tripods and putting them on the table may be a bit cumbersome
    > but it's possible, but I don't seem to be able to zoom out/move the
    > camera far up enough without seeing the tripod in frame. Not a huge
    > problem per se, but I would prefer a mounting solution that works
    > without seeing it of course.
    >
    > Any ideas?


    Build yourself a scaffold to mount it on.
    ray, Nov 19, 2011
    #5
  6. Sandman

    Sandman Guest

    In article <ja881e$q4n$>, Peter Irwin <>
    wrote:

    > Sandman <> wrote:
    > > So I want to make a timelapse movie of me drawing, and I will be
    > > drawing on paper on a table. I have a DSLR and I was wondering if you
    > > knew about a good way to mount it above the paper?
    > >
    > > I have two tripods and putting them on the table may be a bit
    > > cumbersome but it's possible, but I don't seem to be able to zoom
    > > out/move the camera far up enough without seeing the tripod in frame.
    > > Not a huge problem per se, but I would prefer a mounting solution that
    > > works without seeing it of course.
    > >
    > > Any ideas?

    >
    > Do either of your tripods have a reversible column? It is
    > a somewhat under-advertised feature of many tripods.
    >
    > Sometimes mounting the camera on a reversed column below
    > the apex of the tripod can help. Leg shadows can still be
    > a big problem though.
    >
    > Peter.


    I'm not sure I understand what a reversible column would be, and how
    to check if I can use it? :) Sorry


    --
    Sandman[.net]
    Sandman, Nov 19, 2011
    #6
  7. Sandman

    Sandman Guest

    In article <2011111907041788124-savageduck1@REMOVESPAMmecom>,
    Savageduck <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:

    > On 2011-11-19 04:39:10 -0800, Peter Irwin <> said:
    >
    > > Sandman <> wrote:
    > >> So I want to make a timelapse movie of me drawing, and I will be
    > >> drawing on paper on a table. I have a DSLR and I was wondering if you
    > >> knew about a good way to mount it above the paper?
    > >>
    > >> I have two tripods and putting them on the table may be a bit
    > >> cumbersome but it's possible, but I don't seem to be able to zoom
    > >> out/move the camera far up enough without seeing the tripod in frame.
    > >> Not a huge problem per se, but I would prefer a mounting solution that
    > >> works without seeing it of course.
    > >>
    > >> Any ideas?

    > >
    > > Do either of your tripods have a reversible column? It is
    > > a somewhat under-advertised feature of many tripods.
    > >
    > > Sometimes mounting the camera on a reversed column below
    > > the apex of the tripod can help. Leg shadows can still be
    > > a big problem though.
    > >
    > > Peter.

    >
    > Yup!
    > My Manfrotto allows me to mount the camera so that I can avoid a
    > shadow. In this case the target area is on the floor, but I am sure I
    > could make it work over a desk drawing surface.
    > < http://homepage.mac.com/lco/filechute/IMG_0378w.jpg >
    > < http://homepage.mac.com/lco/filechute/IMG_0379w.jpg >


    That was a very nifty setup. My Manfrotto doesn't allow for that,
    unfortunately:

    http://sandman.net/files/manfrotto.jpg

    The small silver latches on the legs make them bend outwards more, but
    I don't think that would help me...

    Maybe I need to get myself one of those that you have...


    --
    Sandman[.net]
    Sandman, Nov 19, 2011
    #7
  8. Sandman

    Sandman Guest

    In article <4ec77c90.6203968@chupacabra>,
    Bob Dobbs <> wrote:

    > Sandman wrote:
    > >So I want to make a timelapse movie of me drawing, and I will be
    > >drawing on paper on a table. I have a DSLR and I was wondering if you
    > >knew about a good way to mount it above the paper?
    > >
    > >I have two tripods and putting them on the table may be a bit
    > >cumbersome but it's possible, but I don't seem to be able to zoom
    > >out/move the camera far up enough without seeing the tripod in frame.
    > >Not a huge problem per se, but I would prefer a mounting solution that
    > >works without seeing it of course.
    > >
    > >Any ideas?

    >
    > What about using the paper mounted/pinned on the wall as your target?


    Because, drawing on a paper pinned to a wall isn't very ergonomic :)


    --
    Sandman[.net]
    Sandman, Nov 19, 2011
    #8
  9. Sandman

    Sandman Guest

    In article
    <>,
    Nervous Nick <> wrote:

    > On Nov 19, 3:51 am, Sandman <> wrote:
    > > So I want to make a timelapse movie of me drawing, and I will be
    > > drawing on paper on a table. I have a DSLR and I was wondering if you
    > > knew about a good way to mount it above the paper?
    > >
    > > I have two tripods and putting them on the table may be a bit
    > > cumbersome but it's possible, but I don't seem to be able to zoom
    > > out/move the camera far up enough without seeing the tripod in frame.
    > > Not a huge problem per se, but I would prefer a mounting solution that
    > > works without seeing it of course.

    >
    > Crop the fucking tripods out of the final photo.


    Right, problem seems to be that the two legs in the image would invade
    the frame to such a degree that cropping them out would also crop away
    the area I'm working on - i.e. the two legs would be on both side of
    it. Or at least that's how it seems in my testing.


    --
    Sandman[.net]
    Sandman, Nov 19, 2011
    #9
  10. Sandman

    Sandman Guest

    In article <>,
    Alan Browne <> wrote:

    > On 2011-11-19 04:51 , Sandman wrote:
    > > So I want to make a timelapse movie of me drawing, and I will be
    > > drawing on paper on a table. I have a DSLR and I was wondering if you
    > > knew about a good way to mount it above the paper?
    > >
    > > I have two tripods and putting them on the table may be a bit
    > > cumbersome but it's possible, but I don't seem to be able to zoom
    > > out/move the camera far up enough without seeing the tripod in frame.
    > > Not a huge problem per se, but I would prefer a mounting solution that
    > > works without seeing it of course.
    > >
    > > Any ideas?

    >
    > Two tripod legs on the floor, one on the table (shorter of course).


    Well, in my testing, the three tripod legs were on the table and at
    their shortest, and the area to photograph was in between two legs,
    yet still they would show up in the frame. One leg at its shortest
    would probably be even worse, but I like your thinking :)


    --
    Sandman[.net]
    Sandman, Nov 19, 2011
    #10
  11. Sandman

    Tim Conway Guest

    "Sandman" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > So I want to make a timelapse movie of me drawing, and I will be
    > drawing on paper on a table. I have a DSLR and I was wondering if you
    > knew about a good way to mount it above the paper?
    >
    > I have two tripods and putting them on the table may be a bit
    > cumbersome but it's possible, but I don't seem to be able to zoom
    > out/move the camera far up enough without seeing the tripod in frame.
    > Not a huge problem per se, but I would prefer a mounting solution that
    > works without seeing it of course.
    >
    > Any ideas?
    >

    What do you want to include in the photo? If you want to include yourself
    drawing, just put the tripod on the floor with a suffieiently wide angle to
    cover you plus your artwork. You will problably need a tripod that will get
    you high enough to angle downward to show the artwork plus yourself. If you
    need to correct for distortion beause of the wide angle, you most likely can
    do that in photoshop or with the plugins such as PTLens..

    Otherwise, you may just have to clone out the tripod legs if you go the
    table mount route.
    Tim Conway, Nov 19, 2011
    #11
  12. Sandman

    Peter Irwin Guest

    Sandman <> wrote:
    >
    > I'm not sure I understand what a reversible column would be, and how
    > to check if I can use it? :) Sorry
    >

    Based on the picture of your tripod, I would try to see if I could
    take the cap off the bottom of the central column of the tripod,
    loosen the knob holding the central column in place and then pull
    the central column up out of the tripod. Then insert the column
    upside down into the bottom of the apex of the tripod.

    If the cap on the bottom of your tripod central column comes off,
    this will probably work. The advantage is that since your camera
    is now a bit lower than your tripod legs, the legs won't show
    when pointing down. You may need to be careful about lighting
    to keep tripod leg shadows out of the picture.

    Peter.
    --
    Peter Irwin, Nov 19, 2011
    #12
  13. Sandman <> writes:

    > So I want to make a timelapse movie of me drawing, and I will be
    > drawing on paper on a table. I have a DSLR and I was wondering if you
    > knew about a good way to mount it above the paper?
    >
    > I have two tripods and putting them on the table may be a bit
    > cumbersome but it's possible, but I don't seem to be able to zoom
    > out/move the camera far up enough without seeing the tripod in frame.
    > Not a huge problem per se, but I would prefer a mounting solution that
    > works without seeing it of course.
    >
    > Any ideas?


    A boom mounted on the tripod (or across two tripods) could put the
    camera directly over the paper and far away from the legs.

    The cheapest solution I can think of that meets my standards of neatness
    is one Bogen Superclamp or equivalent. Now, support a scrap piece of
    pipe or lumber of suitable size or something across above the work area
    with suitable quantities of Gaffer's tape (or duct tape if you don't
    have to worry about the finish on anything), and mount camera below it
    using the clamp. A new Superclamp was $36 last time I bought one, and
    they're amazingly flexible and secure. Look in the studio lighting
    sections of stores and catalogs.

    You could get about the same effect with one of those "gorilla pods" with
    the bendy legs made of balls. Wrapping the legs around the cross-beam
    would let the camera hang below pointing down. It wouldn't be as stable
    or as secure.

    In my own office, I'd just have the superclamp grip the edge of the
    shelf that's conveniently over my workspace. Sometimes the best hack is
    very specific to the space.

    If you've got a shelf up there, you could also have the tripod lie on
    the shelf (legs not spread), probably duct-taped down, with the head
    sticking out off the edge supporting the camera.
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, ; http://dd-b.net/
    Snapshots: http://dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/
    Photos: http://dd-b.net/photography/gallery/
    Dragaera: http://dragaera.info
    David Dyer-Bennet, Nov 19, 2011
    #13
  14. Sandman

    tony cooper Guest

    On Sat, 19 Nov 2011 10:51:06 +0100, Sandman <> wrote:

    >So I want to make a timelapse movie of me drawing, and I will be
    >drawing on paper on a table. I have a DSLR and I was wondering if you
    >knew about a good way to mount it above the paper?
    >
    >I have two tripods and putting them on the table may be a bit
    >cumbersome but it's possible, but I don't seem to be able to zoom
    >out/move the camera far up enough without seeing the tripod in frame.
    >Not a huge problem per se, but I would prefer a mounting solution that
    >works without seeing it of course.
    >
    >Any ideas?


    I do quite a bit of table-top still photography, and I've kludged
    together some Rube Goldberg set-ups that work very well but look
    terrible.

    Here's one that I would use for your project:

    http://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f244/cooper213/gadget.jpg

    In the top image, the camera body is not the one I'd use and the strap
    would be detached. I just wanted to show a body in place.

    The base is a section of plywood with a hole drilled in it that
    accepts a long, threaded section that I bought from Ace Hardware. A
    wing nut holds it in place and two large flat washers hold it steady.
    When I'm not using it, the threaded section is removed for easier
    storage.

    I slotted the base on my table saw so opaque sheets of plastic can be
    inserted to act as light diffusers when I use external lights from the
    side.

    The horizontal pieces are some things I picked up at a yard sale for a
    buck or so each. Flash brackets of some kind, I think. I can use
    just the piece in the middle image, or extend the camera out with the
    piece in the lower image.

    I have a section of parachute material with a lens opening cut-out
    that can be spread across the top of the plastic inserts when I want
    to diffuse light from above.

    This set-up works well for photographs where I'm shooting relatively
    straight down on the subject. Antique pocket watch works, for
    example. I have a tripod with a reversible shaft, but this is quicker
    and easier to set up and work with. No legs in the way and it puts
    the camera at eye level when I place the base on a bench.

    Ugly photos here, and an ugly set-up, but it works.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Nov 19, 2011
    #14
  15. Sandman

    Mike Guest

    On 19/11/2011 4:51 AM, Sandman wrote:
    > So I want to make a timelapse movie of me drawing, and I will be
    > drawing on paper on a table. I have a DSLR and I was wondering if you
    > knew about a good way to mount it above the paper?
    >
    > I have two tripods and putting them on the table may be a bit
    > cumbersome but it's possible, but I don't seem to be able to zoom
    > out/move the camera far up enough without seeing the tripod in frame.
    > Not a huge problem per se, but I would prefer a mounting solution that
    > works without seeing it of course.
    >
    > Any ideas?
    >

    In the old days we used a copystand. You can also use a tripod boom arm
    such as this:

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/554334-REG/Manfrotto_131DD_131DD_Tripod_Accessory_Arm.html

    I would suggest a counterweight to balance the weight. Other similar
    items exist from other makers. Often sold a macro arms, etc.


    Mike
    Mike, Nov 19, 2011
    #15
  16. Sandman

    Robert Coe Guest

    On Sat, 19 Nov 2011 09:36:58 -0800, "Frank S" <> wrote:
    :
    : "Sandman" <> wrote in message
    : news:...
    : > In article <>,
    : > Alan Browne <> wrote:
    : >
    : >> On 2011-11-19 04:51 , Sandman wrote:
    : >> > So I want to make a timelapse movie of me drawing, and I will be
    : >> > drawing on paper on a table. I have a DSLR and I was wondering if you
    : >> > knew about a good way to mount it above the paper?
    : >> >
    : >> > I have two tripods and putting them on the table may be a bit
    : >> > cumbersome but it's possible, but I don't seem to be able to zoom
    : >> > out/move the camera far up enough without seeing the tripod in frame.
    : >> > Not a huge problem per se, but I would prefer a mounting solution that
    : >> > works without seeing it of course.
    : >> >
    : >> > Any ideas?
    : >>
    : >> Two tripod legs on the floor, one on the table (shorter of course).
    : >
    : > Well, in my testing, the three tripod legs were on the table and at
    : > their shortest, and the area to photograph was in between two legs,
    : > yet still they would show up in the frame. One leg at its shortest
    : > would probably be even worse, but I like your thinking :)
    : >
    : >
    :
    : I suppose if your tripod head allows you to point the camera straight up,
    : you could suspend it all from the ceiling? Or the wall?

    The OP wants to take time-lapse pictures of himself drawing. The setup you
    propose would seem to make that operation geometrically impossible. :^)

    Bob
    Robert Coe, Nov 19, 2011
    #16
  17. Sandman

    Tim Conway Guest

    "Sandman" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > So I want to make a timelapse movie of me drawing, and I will be
    > drawing on paper on a table. I have a DSLR and I was wondering if you
    > knew about a good way to mount it above the paper?
    >
    > I have two tripods and putting them on the table may be a bit
    > cumbersome but it's possible, but I don't seem to be able to zoom
    > out/move the camera far up enough without seeing the tripod in frame.
    > Not a huge problem per se, but I would prefer a mounting solution that
    > works without seeing it of course.
    >
    > Any ideas?


    Did I misunderstand or something? It seems to me the OP wants to take a
    series of photos of himself doing the artwork as it progresses. (timelapse)
    A copystand would be fine for the artwork, but will not include the artist.
    My previous comment about a floor standing tripod with a somewhat wide angle
    lens from high enough to include both the artist and the artwork seems to be
    what's required. If the tripod won't go high enough, you could always stand
    it on encyclopedias or some other solid extension! good luck!
    Tim Conway, Nov 19, 2011
    #17
  18. Sandman

    tony cooper Guest

    On Sat, 19 Nov 2011 17:02:39 -0500, "Tim Conway"
    <> wrote:

    >
    >"Sandman" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> So I want to make a timelapse movie of me drawing, and I will be
    >> drawing on paper on a table. I have a DSLR and I was wondering if you
    >> knew about a good way to mount it above the paper?
    >>
    >> I have two tripods and putting them on the table may be a bit
    >> cumbersome but it's possible, but I don't seem to be able to zoom
    >> out/move the camera far up enough without seeing the tripod in frame.
    >> Not a huge problem per se, but I would prefer a mounting solution that
    >> works without seeing it of course.
    >>
    >> Any ideas?

    >
    >Did I misunderstand or something? It seems to me the OP wants to take a
    >series of photos of himself doing the artwork as it progresses. (timelapse)
    >A copystand would be fine for the artwork, but will not include the artist.
    >My previous comment about a floor standing tripod with a somewhat wide angle
    >lens from high enough to include both the artist and the artwork seems to be
    >what's required. If the tripod won't go high enough, you could always stand
    >it on encyclopedias or some other solid extension! good luck!


    The OP hasn't been particularly clear, but I get the impression that
    the timelapse is of what is drawn as the drawing emerges. The OP
    would not be in the image, or only the OP's hands would be in the
    image. Hard to tell.

    I'm guessing something like this:
    http://www.neatorama.com/2010/06/11/time-lapse-pen-drawing/


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Nov 19, 2011
    #18
  19. Sandman

    Tim Conway Guest

    "tony cooper" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sat, 19 Nov 2011 17:02:39 -0500, "Tim Conway"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"Sandman" <> wrote in message
    >>news:...
    >>> So I want to make a timelapse movie of me drawing, and I will be
    >>> drawing on paper on a table. I have a DSLR and I was wondering if you
    >>> knew about a good way to mount it above the paper?
    >>>
    >>> I have two tripods and putting them on the table may be a bit
    >>> cumbersome but it's possible, but I don't seem to be able to zoom
    >>> out/move the camera far up enough without seeing the tripod in frame.
    >>> Not a huge problem per se, but I would prefer a mounting solution that
    >>> works without seeing it of course.
    >>>
    >>> Any ideas?

    >>
    >>Did I misunderstand or something? It seems to me the OP wants to take a
    >>series of photos of himself doing the artwork as it progresses.
    >>(timelapse)
    >>A copystand would be fine for the artwork, but will not include the
    >>artist.
    >>My previous comment about a floor standing tripod with a somewhat wide
    >>angle
    >>lens from high enough to include both the artist and the artwork seems to
    >>be
    >>what's required. If the tripod won't go high enough, you could always
    >>stand
    >>it on encyclopedias or some other solid extension! good luck!

    >
    > The OP hasn't been particularly clear, but I get the impression that
    > the timelapse is of what is drawn as the drawing emerges. The OP
    > would not be in the image, or only the OP's hands would be in the
    > image. Hard to tell.
    >
    > I'm guessing something like this:
    > http://www.neatorama.com/2010/06/11/time-lapse-pen-drawing/
    >
    >

    Cool. I see what you're saying. A copystand would work fine for that.
    Probably not necessary to show complete artist. :)
    Tim Conway, Nov 19, 2011
    #19
  20. Sandman <> wrote:
    > In article <4ec77c90.6203968@chupacabra>,
    > Bob Dobbs <> wrote:


    >> Sandman wrote:
    >> >So I want to make a timelapse movie of me drawing, and I will be
    >> >drawing on paper on a table. I have a DSLR and I was wondering if you
    >> >knew about a good way to mount it above the paper?
    >> >
    >> >I have two tripods and putting them on the table may be a bit
    >> >cumbersome but it's possible, but I don't seem to be able to zoom
    >> >out/move the camera far up enough without seeing the tripod in frame.
    >> >Not a huge problem per se, but I would prefer a mounting solution that
    >> >works without seeing it of course.
    >> >
    >> >Any ideas?

    >>
    >> What about using the paper mounted/pinned on the wall as your target?


    > Because, drawing on a paper pinned to a wall isn't very ergonomic :)


    Drawing on an easel? Or architect's type drawing board?

    --
    Chris Malcolm
    Chris Malcolm, Nov 19, 2011
    #20
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