Time Compressed TV

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Joe, Sep 21, 2007.

  1. Joe

    Joe Guest

    A lot of programs are being sped up, probably to free up more time for
    commercials.

    It looks roughly like a 10% or more speed up.

    This speed up was even on a movie *DVD* that I checked out from the library.

    What is this process called? I haven't seen or heard anything about it,
    except with my own TV viewing.

    --- Joe

    --
    Delete the second "o" to email me.
    Joe, Sep 21, 2007
    #1
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  2. (Joe) wrote:

    >A lot of programs are being sped up, probably to free up more time for
    >commercials.
    >
    >It looks roughly like a 10% or more speed up.
    >
    >This speed up was even on a movie *DVD* that I checked out from the library.
    >
    >What is this process called? I haven't seen or heard anything about it,
    >except with my own TV viewing.


    It's called time compression.

    Some of the movie channels will tell you that they've done it, in a
    disclaimer at the beginning of the movie. TVLand seems to do it to
    everything they show.

    They can get an extra minute of commercials into a half-hour show with
    just a 4% speedup, the same amount applied to all films for broadcast in
    PAL countries, and the PAL folks will tell you no one ever notices. Right.

    There is no reason to do this to a DVD, but I've also seen chopped-up
    syndicated versions of TV shows make it to DVD, so it depends on the DVD
    maker and how diligent they are in getting the proper materials.
    Kimba W. Lion, Sep 21, 2007
    #2
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  3. Joe

    Stuart Guest

    "Kimba W. Lion" <kimbawlion> wrote in message
    news:...
    > (Joe) wrote:
    >
    >>A lot of programs are being sped up, probably to free up more time for
    >>commercials.
    >>
    >>It looks roughly like a 10% or more speed up.
    >>
    >>This speed up was even on a movie *DVD* that I checked out from the
    >>library.
    >>
    >>What is this process called? I haven't seen or heard anything about it,
    >>except with my own TV viewing.

    >
    > It's called time compression.
    >
    > Some of the movie channels will tell you that they've done it, in a
    > disclaimer at the beginning of the movie. TVLand seems to do it to
    > everything they show.
    >
    > They can get an extra minute of commercials into a half-hour show with
    > just a 4% speedup, the same amount applied to all films for broadcast in
    > PAL countries, and the PAL folks will tell you no one ever notices. Right.
    >
    > There is no reason to do this to a DVD, but I've also seen chopped-up
    > syndicated versions of TV shows make it to DVD, so it depends on the DVD
    > maker and how diligent they are in getting the proper materials.



    Half right! In PAL countries "shot on film" movies from foreign sources like
    the USA etc are shot at 24 fps and shown at 25 fps on TV (at 24fps in
    cinemas) so yes that's 4% fast. Where you do hear the difference is if an US
    actor is being interviewed live on TV and then a film clip is shown suddenly
    it sounds like he's lost one of his ***** !!

    On the other hand all TV produced material in PAL countries is produced at
    25 fps and indeed some but not very much film material is also shot at 25
    fps especially if it is for local TV use - so it's a mixed bag really.

    The technology to speed up audio without affecting the pitch has been around
    since the early 1950's. The EMT Pitch and Tempo regulator a tape technology
    does this, these days it's dead easy with a plug-in in Adobe Audition...

    The other complication with DVD's is where they are authored. In most PAL
    countries modern TV's and DVD players are multi- standard, ie PAL or NTSC
    and most are easily multi region. So I can play a NTSC DVD on my DVD player
    set my TV on NTSC and play as intended or basically leave it on automatic
    and it all just happens..
    Stuart, Sep 22, 2007
    #3
  4. Joe

    teem Guest

    On Fri, 21 Sep 2007 23:38:42 GMT, "Stuart" <stuart€@whodunnit8.com>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Kimba W. Lion" <kimbawlion> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> (Joe) wrote:
    >>
    >>>A lot of programs are being sped up, probably to free up more time for
    >>>commercials.
    >>>
    >>>It looks roughly like a 10% or more speed up.
    >>>
    >>>This speed up was even on a movie *DVD* that I checked out from the
    >>>library.
    >>>
    >>>What is this process called? I haven't seen or heard anything about it,
    >>>except with my own TV viewing.

    >>
    >> It's called time compression.
    >>
    >> Some of the movie channels will tell you that they've done it, in a
    >> disclaimer at the beginning of the movie. TVLand seems to do it to
    >> everything they show.
    >>
    >> They can get an extra minute of commercials into a half-hour show with
    >> just a 4% speedup, the same amount applied to all films for broadcast in
    >> PAL countries, and the PAL folks will tell you no one ever notices. Right.
    >>
    >> There is no reason to do this to a DVD, but I've also seen chopped-up
    >> syndicated versions of TV shows make it to DVD, so it depends on the DVD
    >> maker and how diligent they are in getting the proper materials.

    >
    >
    >Half right! In PAL countries "shot on film" movies from foreign sources like
    >the USA etc are shot at 24 fps and shown at 25 fps on TV (at 24fps in
    >cinemas) so yes that's 4% fast. Where you do hear the difference is if an US
    >actor is being interviewed live on TV and then a film clip is shown suddenly
    >it sounds like he's lost one of his ***** !!
    >
    >On the other hand all TV produced material in PAL countries is produced at
    >25 fps and indeed some but not very much film material is also shot at 25
    >fps especially if it is for local TV use - so it's a mixed bag really.
    >
    >The technology to speed up audio without affecting the pitch has been around
    >since the early 1950's. The EMT Pitch and Tempo regulator a tape technology
    >does this, these days it's dead easy with a plug-in in Adobe Audition...
    >
    >The other complication with DVD's is where they are authored. In most PAL
    >countries modern TV's and DVD players are multi- standard, ie PAL or NTSC
    >and most are easily multi region. So I can play a NTSC DVD on my DVD player
    >set my TV on NTSC and play as intended or basically leave it on automatic
    >and it all just happens..
    >

    I 1st noticed this compression a few years ago while watching a
    Waltons ep.there was a far shot of someone walking outside in a town &
    it looked like he had the ''hiccups'' in the legs.
    teem, Sep 22, 2007
    #4
  5. Joe

    Mark W Guest

    "Joe" <> wrote in message
    news:none-2009072249560001@dialup-4.232.126.114.dial1.losangeles1.level3.net...
    >A lot of programs are being sped up, probably to free up more time for
    > commercials.
    >
    > It looks roughly like a 10% or more speed up.
    >
    > This speed up was even on a movie *DVD* that I checked out from the
    > library.
    >
    > What is this process called? I haven't seen or heard anything about it,
    > except with my own TV viewing.
    >
    > --- Joe



    Are you sure your brain isn't slowing down?
    Mark W, Sep 24, 2007
    #5
  6. On Fri, 21 Sep 2007 10:17:46 -0400, Kimba W. Lion <kimbawlion> wrote:

    >They can get an extra minute of commercials into a half-hour show with
    >just a 4% speedup, the same amount applied to all films for broadcast in
    >PAL countries, and the PAL folks will tell you no one ever notices. Right.


    Seriously, we don't. The reason we speed up to 25fps is that we then
    get one film frame for one video frame and thus very good motion
    rendition, unlike the 3:2 pulldown stutter that you have to put up
    with in the US. You probably don't even notice it, but it sticks out
    like a sore thumb to us! I guess it's what you grow up with...

    Steve

    The Doctor Who Restoration Team Website
    http://www.restoration-team.co.uk
    Steve Roberts, Sep 25, 2007
    #6
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