Ticking "archive" and "hidden" in Windows Explorer

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by RJ, Sep 10, 2004.

  1. RJ

    RJ Guest

    I right clicked on a folder in Windows Explorer and, just to see what
    happens, I ticked the "archive" and "hidden" boxes, then did "apply". I
    can't see that anything has changed. It opens just fine and when I did a
    search the file was found no prob. Can someone tell me what happens, or is
    *supposed* to happen when you do this? Is the file/folder saved or archived
    somewhere else as well? Thank.
     
    RJ, Sep 10, 2004
    #1
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  2. RJ

    Old Gringo Guest

    RJ wrote:
    > I right clicked on a folder in Windows Explorer and, just to see what
    > happens, I ticked the "archive" and "hidden" boxes, then did "apply". I
    > can't see that anything has changed. It opens just fine and when I did a
    > search the file was found no prob. Can someone tell me what happens, or is
    > *supposed* to happen when you do this? Is the file/folder saved or archived
    > somewhere else as well? Thank.
    >
    >

    Just look the 2 words up in the dictionary. You will find the answer
    there.

    --
    Old Gringo George
    Just West Of Nowhere
    Enjoy Life And Live It To Its Fullest
    Freedom For The World <http://www.nuboy-industries.com/>
     
    Old Gringo, Sep 10, 2004
    #2
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  3. RJ

    Unk Guest

    On Fri, 10 Sep 2004 00:09:19 GMT, "RJ" <> wrote:

    >I right clicked on a folder in Windows Explorer and, just to see what
    >happens, I ticked the "archive" and "hidden" boxes, then did "apply". I
    >can't see that anything has changed. It opens just fine and when I did a
    >search the file was found no prob. Can someone tell me what happens, or is
    >*supposed* to happen when you do this? Is the file/folder saved or archived
    >somewhere else as well? Thank.
    >

    Source: The Microsoft Computer Dictionary, Fifth Edition

    Archive bit n. A bit that is associated with a file and is used to indicate
    whether the file has been backed up. (In other words, a copy)

    Hidden bit n. A file that, in order to protect it from deletion or
    modification, is not shown in the normal listing of the files contained in a
    directory. Such a file is often used to store code or data critical to the
    operating system.
     
    Unk, Sep 10, 2004
    #3
  4. "Unk" <> az alábbiakat írta a következo hírüzenetben:
    ...
    > On Fri, 10 Sep 2004 00:09:19 GMT, "RJ" <> wrote:
    >
    > >I right clicked on a folder in Windows Explorer and, just to see what
    > >happens, I ticked the "archive" and "hidden" boxes, then did "apply". I
    > >can't see that anything has changed. It opens just fine and when I did a
    > >search the file was found no prob. Can someone tell me what happens, or

    is
    > >*supposed* to happen when you do this? Is the file/folder saved or

    archived
    > >somewhere else as well? Thank.
    > >

    > Source: The Microsoft Computer Dictionary, Fifth Edition
    >
    > Archive bit n. A bit that is associated with a file and is used to

    indicate
    > whether the file has been backed up. (In other words, a copy)
    >
    > Hidden bit n. A file that, in order to protect it from deletion or
    > modification, is not shown in the normal listing of the files contained in

    a
    > directory. Such a file is often used to store code or data critical to the
    > operating system.
    >
     
    Megapluszterv, Sep 10, 2004
    #4
  5. RJ

    RJ Guest

    "Megapluszterv" <> wrote in message
    news:gjb0d.263992$...
    >
    > "Unk" <> az alábbiakat írta a következo hírüzenetben:
    > ...
    > > On Fri, 10 Sep 2004 00:09:19 GMT, "RJ" <> wrote:
    > >
    > > >I right clicked on a folder in Windows Explorer and, just to see what
    > > >happens, I ticked the "archive" and "hidden" boxes, then did "apply". I
    > > >can't see that anything has changed. It opens just fine and when I did

    a
    > > >search the file was found no prob. Can someone tell me what happens, or

    is*supposed* to happen when you do this? Is the file/folder saved or
    > archived somewhere else as well? Thanks.


    > > Source: The Microsoft Computer Dictionary, Fifth Edition
    > >
    > > Archive bit n. A bit that is associated with a file and is used to

    > indicate whether the file has been backed up. (In other words, a copy)
    > > Hidden bit n. A file that, in order to protect it from deletion or
    > > modification, is not shown in the normal listing of the files contained

    in
    > a directory. Such a file is often used to store code or data critical to

    the
    > > operating system.


    Okay, but WHERE would the 'archive', or 'backed up' copy be? Where is it
    stored? If I deleted the original, would I still be able to restore it from
    the archived copy? If so, how would I find it?
    I figured out the "hidden" part of my question. The folder was there all
    along, it just didn't show as long as I had "do not show hidden files"
    selected in the Tools> Folder Options> View menu .
    Thanks again.
     
    RJ, Sep 10, 2004
    #5
  6. RJ

    Unk Guest

    It's only MARKED as archived. That prevents it from being added to a backup
    set that's being refreshed. It's a holdever from the old DOS days and
    really doesn't count for much these days....

    On Fri, 10 Sep 2004 08:25:23 GMT, "RJ" <> wrote:

    >
    >"Megapluszterv" <> wrote in message
    >news:gjb0d.263992$...
    >>
    >> "Unk" <> az alábbiakat írta a következo hírüzenetben:
    >> ...
    >> > On Fri, 10 Sep 2004 00:09:19 GMT, "RJ" <> wrote:
    >> >
    >> > >I right clicked on a folder in Windows Explorer and, just to see what
    >> > >happens, I ticked the "archive" and "hidden" boxes, then did "apply". I
    >> > >can't see that anything has changed. It opens just fine and when I did

    >a
    >> > >search the file was found no prob. Can someone tell me what happens, or

    >is*supposed* to happen when you do this? Is the file/folder saved or
    >> archived somewhere else as well? Thanks.

    >
    >> > Source: The Microsoft Computer Dictionary, Fifth Edition
    >> >
    >> > Archive bit n. A bit that is associated with a file and is used to

    >> indicate whether the file has been backed up. (In other words, a copy)
    >> > Hidden bit n. A file that, in order to protect it from deletion or
    >> > modification, is not shown in the normal listing of the files contained

    >in
    >> a directory. Such a file is often used to store code or data critical to

    >the
    >> > operating system.

    >
    >Okay, but WHERE would the 'archive', or 'backed up' copy be? Where is it
    >stored? If I deleted the original, would I still be able to restore it from
    >the archived copy? If so, how would I find it?
    >I figured out the "hidden" part of my question. The folder was there all
    >along, it just didn't show as long as I had "do not show hidden files"
    >selected in the Tools> Folder Options> View menu .
    >Thanks again.
    >
     
    Unk, Sep 11, 2004
    #6
  7. RJ

    RJ Guest

    Gotcha, Unk. Appreciate it.

    "Unk" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > It's only MARKED as archived. That prevents it from being added to a

    backup
    > set that's being refreshed. It's a holdever from the old DOS days and
    > really doesn't count for much these days....
    >
    > On Fri, 10 Sep 2004 08:25:23 GMT, "RJ" <> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >"Megapluszterv" <> wrote in message
    > >news:gjb0d.263992$...
    > >>
    > >> "Unk" <> az alábbiakat írta a következo hírüzenetben:
    > >> ...
    > >> > On Fri, 10 Sep 2004 00:09:19 GMT, "RJ" <>

    wrote:
    > >> >
    > >> > >I right clicked on a folder in Windows Explorer and, just to see

    what
    > >> > >happens, I ticked the "archive" and "hidden" boxes, then did

    "apply". I
    > >> > >can't see that anything has changed. It opens just fine and when I

    did
    > >a
    > >> > >search the file was found no prob. Can someone tell me what happens,

    or
    > >is*supposed* to happen when you do this? Is the file/folder saved or
    > >> archived somewhere else as well? Thanks.

    > >
    > >> > Source: The Microsoft Computer Dictionary, Fifth Edition
    > >> >
    > >> > Archive bit n. A bit that is associated with a file and is used to
    > >> indicate whether the file has been backed up. (In other words, a copy)
    > >> > Hidden bit n. A file that, in order to protect it from deletion or
    > >> > modification, is not shown in the normal listing of the files

    contained
    > >in
    > >> a directory. Such a file is often used to store code or data critical

    to
    > >the
    > >> > operating system.

    > >
    > >Okay, but WHERE would the 'archive', or 'backed up' copy be? Where is it
    > >stored? If I deleted the original, would I still be able to restore it

    from
    > >the archived copy? If so, how would I find it?
    > >I figured out the "hidden" part of my question. The folder was there all
    > >along, it just didn't show as long as I had "do not show hidden files"
    > >selected in the Tools> Folder Options> View menu .
    > >Thanks again.
    > >

    >
     
    RJ, Sep 11, 2004
    #7
  8. RJ

    Jim Berwick Guest

    Unk <> wrote in
    news::

    > It's only MARKED as archived. That prevents it from being added to a
    > backup set that's being refreshed. It's a holdever from the old DOS
    > days and really doesn't count for much these days....
    >


    Actually, being marked archive doesn't prevent it from being added to a
    backup set, it says "I'm ready to be backed up". When a backup program
    runs, it removes the archive bits from the files it backs up. If anything
    saves over them or touches them, it puts the archive back on so that the
    backup program knows the file has changed.
     
    Jim Berwick, Sep 11, 2004
    #8
  9. RJ

    RJ Guest

    "Jim Berwick" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns95617F5304C2Bjimbsnipnet@207.103.26.26...
    > Unk <> wrote in
    > news::
    >
    > > It's only MARKED as archived. That prevents it from being added to a
    > > backup set that's being refreshed. It's a holdever from the old DOS
    > > days and really doesn't count for much these days....
    > >

    >
    > Actually, being marked archive doesn't prevent it from being added to a
    > backup set, it says "I'm ready to be backed up". When a backup program
    > runs, it removes the archive bits from the files it backs up. If anything
    > saves over them or touches them, it puts the archive back on so that the
    > backup program knows the file has changed.


    So, in actuality, the whole archiving system deals only with *selectively*
    backing up files? Once I delete the file, if I need it again I can no longer
    retrieve it from some "archive" hidden away somewhere, like I first
    supposed? It isn't like the recycle bin at all?
     
    RJ, Sep 11, 2004
    #9
  10. RJ

    Jim Berwick Guest

    "RJ" <> wrote in
    news:FRG0d.22886$MQ5.16839@attbi_s52:

    > So, in actuality, the whole archiving system deals only with
    > *selectively* backing up files? Once I delete the file, if I need it
    > again I can no longer retrieve it from some "archive" hidden away
    > somewhere, like I first supposed? It isn't like the recycle bin at
    > all?


    No, nothing at all like the recycle bin.
     
    Jim Berwick, Sep 12, 2004
    #10
  11. RJ

    DevilsPGD Guest

    In message <FRG0d.22886$MQ5.16839@attbi_s52> "RJ"
    <> wrote:

    >> > It's only MARKED as archived. That prevents it from being added to a
    >> > backup set that's being refreshed. It's a holdever from the old DOS
    >> > days and really doesn't count for much these days....
    >> >

    >>
    >> Actually, being marked archive doesn't prevent it from being added to a
    >> backup set, it says "I'm ready to be backed up". When a backup program
    >> runs, it removes the archive bits from the files it backs up. If anything
    >> saves over them or touches them, it puts the archive back on so that the
    >> backup program knows the file has changed.

    >
    >So, in actuality, the whole archiving system deals only with *selectively*
    >backing up files? Once I delete the file, if I need it again I can no longer
    >retrieve it from some "archive" hidden away somewhere, like I first
    >supposed? It isn't like the recycle bin at all?


    Nope. In the old days (This goes back to DOS ~3.3, I believe, although
    it might be earlier) what happened was simple. Each file that created
    or modified had the archive bit set.

    This meant that it was a simple matter to create a "backup" using xcopy
    that would only copy new or changed files without reading the source
    files (or even having a previous backup handy)

    In reality you can't have 100% trust that this bit will be set
    correctly, so it's not totally safe for backups in todays world.


    --
    A: Maybe because some people are too annoyed by top-posting.
    Q: Why do I not get an answer to my question(s)?
    A: Because it messes up the order in which people normally read text.
    Q: Why is top-posting such a bad thing?
     
    DevilsPGD, Sep 12, 2004
    #11
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