this might be a silly question but

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Nick, Aug 19, 2004.

  1. Nick

    Nick Guest

    when you buy a mother board, it comes with the cpu chip. right ? Or is
    the cpu purchased as a separate article. Or is that a matter of choice
    if you buy it separately or not ?

    Sorry if some of these questions are silly questions, but Im really
    trying to get others thoughts on this and that as well as looking around
    google. Not to mention dick smiths etc. lol
    Nick, Aug 19, 2004
    #1
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  2. Nick

    cowboyz Guest

    Nick wrote:
    > when you buy a mother board, it comes with the cpu chip. right ? Or
    > is the cpu purchased as a separate article. Or is that a matter of
    > choice if you buy it separately or not ?
    >
    > Sorry if some of these questions are silly questions, but Im really
    > trying to get others thoughts on this and that as well as looking
    > around google. Not to mention dick smiths etc.


    The motherboard and CPU are seperate components. You buy them seperately.
    Take notice when/if you buy a CPU that it comes with a fan because some
    "deals" on the CPUs don't.

    Don't shop at DSE for components. Check out pricespy.co.nz for a computer
    parts company and pick one that is close to your location that you can visit
    and ask questions. If you have a mate who is knowledgeable in putting
    things together it will pay to get him to look over your shoulder while
    building/rebuilding your machine. Once you get into building your own (and
    it is not very hard at all) you will never buy a PC off the shelf again.
    cowboyz, Aug 19, 2004
    #2
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  3. Nick

    Nick Guest

    cowboyz wrote:

    > Nick wrote:
    >
    >>when you buy a mother board, it comes with the cpu chip. right ? Or
    >>is the cpu purchased as a separate article. Or is that a matter of
    >>choice if you buy it separately or not ?
    >>
    >>Sorry if some of these questions are silly questions, but Im really
    >>trying to get others thoughts on this and that as well as looking
    >>around google. Not to mention dick smiths etc.

    >
    >
    > The motherboard and CPU are seperate components. You buy them seperately.
    > Take notice when/if you buy a CPU that it comes with a fan because some
    > "deals" on the CPUs don't.
    >
    > Don't shop at DSE for components. Check out pricespy.co.nz for a computer
    > parts company and pick one that is close to your location that you can visit
    > and ask questions. If you have a mate who is knowledgeable in putting
    > things together it will pay to get him to look over your shoulder while
    > building/rebuilding your machine. Once you get into building your own (and
    > it is not very hard at all) you will never buy a PC off the shelf again.
    >
    >
    >

    Yeah. got that cowboys. Im doing a partime course, in combination with
    earning a crust and doin another paper too. (geesh my head hurts) but
    I pulled a pc apart and put it together again so yes, it simple enough.
    Im just wading into this area and getting a sence of direction on the
    topic. Combinations , makes etc. thats why Im asking around.

    thanks.
    Nick, Aug 19, 2004
    #3
  4. In article <cg338t$gli$> in nz.comp on Fri, 20 Aug 2004
    08:41:00 +1200, cowboyz <> says...
    > Nick wrote:
    > > when you buy a mother board, it comes with the cpu chip. right ? Or
    > > is the cpu purchased as a separate article. Or is that a matter of
    > > choice if you buy it separately or not ?
    > >
    > > Sorry if some of these questions are silly questions, but Im really
    > > trying to get others thoughts on this and that as well as looking
    > > around google. Not to mention dick smiths etc.

    >
    > The motherboard and CPU are seperate components. You buy them seperately.


    That said, CPUs change so often that changing CPU type often requires
    changing the motherboard as well.
    Patrick Dunford, Aug 20, 2004
    #4
  5. Nick

    A Guest

    On Fri, 20 Aug 2004 08:41:00 +1200, "cowboyz" <> wrote:

    >Nick wrote:
    >> when you buy a mother board, it comes with the cpu chip. right ? Or
    >> is the cpu purchased as a separate article. Or is that a matter of
    >> choice if you buy it separately or not ?
    >>
    >> Sorry if some of these questions are silly questions, but Im really
    >> trying to get others thoughts on this and that as well as looking
    >> around google. Not to mention dick smiths etc.

    >
    >The motherboard and CPU are seperate components. You buy them seperately.
    >Take notice when/if you buy a CPU that it comes with a fan because some
    >"deals" on the CPUs don't.
    >
    >Don't shop at DSE for components. Check out pricespy.co.nz for a computer
    >parts company and pick one that is close to your location that you can visit
    >and ask questions. If you have a mate who is knowledgeable in putting
    >things together it will pay to get him to look over your shoulder while
    >building/rebuilding your machine. Once you get into building your own (and
    >it is not very hard at all) you will never buy a PC off the shelf again.


    I'll have to disagree with the cowboyz there. DSE are ok for some
    components. My 512MB legend DDR400 ram is from there ($149 on special)
    and so is my MSI Nforce2 motherboard ($88 -- again on special)

    The three main advantages with DSE is a) availability - they generally
    have it in stock b) opening times 7 days a week c) they accept credit
    cards without a surcharge

    Still, shop around to see what everyone else is offering.
    A, Aug 20, 2004
    #5
  6. Nick

    Nick Guest

    Patrick Dunford wrote:
    > In article <cg338t$gli$> in nz.comp on Fri, 20 Aug 2004
    > 08:41:00 +1200, cowboyz <> says...
    >
    >>Nick wrote:
    >>
    >>>when you buy a mother board, it comes with the cpu chip. right ? Or
    >>>is the cpu purchased as a separate article. Or is that a matter of
    >>>choice if you buy it separately or not ?
    >>>
    >>>Sorry if some of these questions are silly questions, but Im really
    >>>trying to get others thoughts on this and that as well as looking
    >>>around google. Not to mention dick smiths etc.

    >>
    >>The motherboard and CPU are seperate components. You buy them seperately.

    >
    >
    > That said, CPUs change so often that changing CPU type often requires
    > changing the motherboard as well.
    >

    Hmmmmmm
    Nick, Aug 20, 2004
    #6
  7. Nick

    cowboyz Guest

    A wrote:

    > I'll have to disagree with the cowboyz there. DSE are ok for some
    > components. My 512MB legend DDR400 ram is from there ($149 on special)
    > and so is my MSI Nforce2 motherboard ($88 -- again on special)
    >
    > The three main advantages with DSE is a) availability - they generally
    > have it in stock b) opening times 7 days a week c) they accept credit
    > cards without a surcharge
    >
    > Still, shop around to see what everyone else is offering.


    Probably a fair call. My DVD ROM is from DSE. But generally speaking, if
    you aren't 100% sure about what you want and the price you want to pay DSE
    are to be avoided. Their "knowledgable" staff are few and far between.
    cowboyz, Aug 20, 2004
    #7
  8. Nick

    ~misfit~ Guest

    cowboyz wrote:
    > A wrote:
    >
    >> I'll have to disagree with the cowboyz there. DSE are ok for some
    >> components. My 512MB legend DDR400 ram is from there ($149 on
    >> special) and so is my MSI Nforce2 motherboard ($88 -- again on
    >> special)
    >>
    >> The three main advantages with DSE is a) availability - they
    >> generally have it in stock b) opening times 7 days a week c) they
    >> accept credit cards without a surcharge
    >>
    >> Still, shop around to see what everyone else is offering.

    >
    > Probably a fair call. My DVD ROM is from DSE. But generally
    > speaking, if you aren't 100% sure about what you want and the price
    > you want to pay DSE are to be avoided. Their "knowledgable" staff
    > are few and far between.


    They do have an excellent 14 day right-of-return (used to be 7-day) policy
    though. No questions asked, as long as the original packaging is returned
    along with and instructions etc. I must admit to having used it once to rule
    out a PSU as being the problem in a system I had when I didn't have a spare
    on hand.

    Also they have a VIP club, I got free membership for spending a certain
    amount in one hit ($250?). You get a laminated card that entitles you to 10%
    or more off software (games) that aren't already on special and, if you
    register the card number on the website you get a wee cookie that logs you
    in as a VIP member when you go to their site and when you click on an item
    you often get a VIP price offered as well as the regular price. I bought a
    NiMH/NiCad smart-charger (inc 4 x 2,000mAh NiMH AA batts) last week for my
    digi-cam, list price $89.95, they scanned my card and it dropped to $81.50.
    Not a lot but worth having. On items that have a VIP price the savings range
    from 5-15%. Also, apparently each time you scan your card with a purchase
    you go into the draw for $100 store-credit per month, per store.

    I believe it's free membership if you make a big buy, or there's a fee to
    join otherwise. It's saved me quite a few bucks over the years.

    Oh well, my pain-killers are kicking in, time to go pick up some 'computer
    gear'. I met a nice lady (cultured accent) when our rented house was on the
    market a couple of weeks ago who saw I was into computers (hard to miss, I
    had a soldering iron in one hand, a capacitor in the other and a mobo
    between my knees at the time) and said that her son, who is a software
    engineer, went overseas a year ago and left them with a pile of "computer
    gear, including a couple of screens" that she was didn't want cluttering up
    her house. She told me she'd contact him and ask if she could give them to
    me. She rang this morning and asked if I'd like to go around today and pick
    it up. I'm just hoping it isn't a few 486's and 14" VGA monitors. <fingers
    crossed>.
    --
    ~misfit~
    ~misfit~, Aug 20, 2004
    #8
  9. Nick

    A Guest

    On Sat, 21 Aug 2004 08:11:33 +1200, "cowboyz" <> wrote:

    >A wrote:
    >
    >> I'll have to disagree with the cowboyz there. DSE are ok for some
    >> components. My 512MB legend DDR400 ram is from there ($149 on special)
    >> and so is my MSI Nforce2 motherboard ($88 -- again on special)
    >>
    >> The three main advantages with DSE is a) availability - they generally
    >> have it in stock b) opening times 7 days a week c) they accept credit
    >> cards without a surcharge
    >>
    >> Still, shop around to see what everyone else is offering.

    >
    >Probably a fair call. My DVD ROM is from DSE. But generally speaking, if
    >you aren't 100% sure about what you want and the price you want to pay DSE
    >are to be avoided. Their "knowledgable" staff are few and far between.
    >


    Two more advantages I forgot about:

    d) as misfit pointed out, their returns policy is much better than
    most PC stores

    e) they're not afraid to seriously markdown items for clearance (my
    15" LCD screen was on clearance for $388 last year and I once picked
    up an xbox game for $5 and other PC games for $5-$10)
    A, Aug 21, 2004
    #9
  10. Nick

    ~misfit~ Guest

    ~misfit~ wrote:
    >
    > Oh well, my pain-killers are kicking in, time to go pick up some
    > 'computer gear'. I met a nice lady (cultured accent) when our rented
    > house was on the market a couple of weeks ago who saw I was into
    > computers (hard to miss, I had a soldering iron in one hand, a
    > capacitor in the other and a mobo between my knees at the time) and
    > said that her son, who is a software engineer, went overseas a year
    > ago and left them with a pile of "computer gear, including a couple
    > of screens" that she was didn't want cluttering up her house. She
    > told me she'd contact him and ask if she could give them to me. She
    > rang this morning and asked if I'd like to go around today and pick
    > it up. I'm just hoping it isn't a few 486's and 14" VGA monitors.
    > <fingers crossed>.


    Two 14" monitors, (1991) four AT midi-towers, one sub-1GB HDD, one CDROM and
    one FDD drive amongst them, don't know if they work, I haven't tested
    anything yet. One 486, two P1's and a really old (AT) slot 1 board with no
    CPU. One of the cases had a couple of fairly new two-port PCI USB 1 cards,
    (Anyone want one?) I got a 56k ISA modem and an ISA Vibra 16, (All still
    untested) few 4-8MB sticks of 72-pin RAM, otherwise pretty much all going in
    the rubbish.

    Oh well, worth a look, kept me busy for a couple of hours so far and will
    keep the wheelie-bin topped up for the next couple of weeks. LOL, she asked
    me if I knew anyone who wanted to buy a laptop for around $500. I asked the
    specs, she said it's a 486 but doesn't know anything else. I gently
    mentioned that it wasn't even worth $100 if it was in excellent condition in
    a leather carry-case. (I was going to say $50 but I didn't want to shock her
    too much after she said $500). She said she'll talk to her son again and
    maybe get back to me. I don't want to hurt her feelings if she does, she
    *is* a nice person. However, if it is in perfect condition (the battery
    *will* be shot) I'd only give her $20 for it, and then only to be nice. I
    have no use for a 486 lappy. Who does these days? It wouldn't even be any
    good for off-loading pics from my digital camera. (That's about the only
    reason I'd have for getting a low-end lappy, for trips away, and then the
    money would probably be better spent on a bigger card for the camera).
    --
    ~misfit~
    ~misfit~, Aug 21, 2004
    #10
  11. Nick

    Divine Guest

    On Sat, 21 Aug 2004 14:41:57 +1200, ~misfit~ wrote:

    > Two 14" monitors, (1991) four AT midi-towers, one sub-1GB HDD, one CDROM and
    > one FDD drive amongst them, don't know if they work, I haven't tested
    > anything yet. One 486, two P1's and a really old (AT) slot 1 board with no
    > CPU. One of the cases had a couple of fairly new two-port PCI USB 1 cards,
    > (Anyone want one?) I got a 56k ISA modem and an ISA Vibra 16, (All still
    > untested) few 4-8MB sticks of 72-pin RAM, otherwise pretty much all going in
    > the rubbish.


    Remember the days when the Vibra 16 actually sounded good?

    You could use one of the Pentiums as a firewall/router for your home
    network if you haven't already got one running. They are very good for
    things like that. From experience I'd recommend using a separate dual
    speed hub tho', if you want the network to function at the faster of the
    two speeds.


    Divine

    --
    "A life? Sounds great! Do you know where I could download one?"
    Divine, Aug 21, 2004
    #11
  12. ~misfit~ wrote:
    > I
    > have no use for a 486 lappy. Who does these days? It wouldn't even be any
    > good for off-loading pics from my digital camera.


    I passed a heap of old lappys from work to some car guys that I know who
    use them for the serial port to capture engine data.

    they run the cable to the cabin, and power the lappy off the cig lighter.

    running windows 98, but only for the ability to easily transfer the data
    to a desktop via network.
    Dave - Dave.net.nz, Aug 21, 2004
    #12
  13. Nick

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Divine wrote:
    > On Sat, 21 Aug 2004 14:41:57 +1200, ~misfit~ wrote:
    >
    >> Two 14" monitors, (1991) four AT midi-towers, one sub-1GB HDD, one
    >> CDROM and one FDD drive amongst them, don't know if they work, I
    >> haven't tested anything yet. One 486, two P1's and a really old (AT)
    >> slot 1 board with no CPU. One of the cases had a couple of fairly
    >> new two-port PCI USB 1 cards, (Anyone want one?) I got a 56k ISA
    >> modem and an ISA Vibra 16, (All still untested) few 4-8MB sticks of
    >> 72-pin RAM, otherwise pretty much all going in the rubbish.

    >
    > Remember the days when the Vibra 16 actually sounded good?


    Sure do.

    > You could use one of the Pentiums as a firewall/router for your home
    > network if you haven't already got one running. They are very good for
    > things like that. From experience I'd recommend using a separate dual
    > speed hub tho', if you want the network to function at the faster of
    > the two speeds.


    I tried that once using E-Smith but it didn't like me. I gave up on it after
    a few days.
    --
    ~misfit~
    ~misfit~, Aug 21, 2004
    #13
  14. Nick

    cowboyz Guest

    A wrote:
    > On Sat, 21 Aug 2004 08:11:33 +1200, "cowboyz" <> wrote:
    >
    >> A wrote:
    >>
    >>> I'll have to disagree with the cowboyz there. DSE are ok for some
    >>> components. My 512MB legend DDR400 ram is from there ($149 on
    >>> special) and so is my MSI Nforce2 motherboard ($88 -- again on
    >>> special)
    >>>
    >>> The three main advantages with DSE is a) availability - they
    >>> generally have it in stock b) opening times 7 days a week c) they
    >>> accept credit cards without a surcharge
    >>>
    >>> Still, shop around to see what everyone else is offering.

    >>
    >> Probably a fair call. My DVD ROM is from DSE. But generally
    >> speaking, if you aren't 100% sure about what you want and the price
    >> you want to pay DSE are to be avoided. Their "knowledgable" staff
    >> are few and far between.
    >>

    >
    > Two more advantages I forgot about:
    >
    > d) as misfit pointed out, their returns policy is much better than
    > most PC stores
    >
    > e) they're not afraid to seriously markdown items for clearance (my
    > 15" LCD screen was on clearance for $388 last year


    So you were the bugger. I heard about the $388 LCD monitors and went in but
    they had just sold the last one. Bugger. I am *still* on CRTs!

    >and I once picked
    > up an xbox game for $5 and other PC games for $5-$10)
    cowboyz, Aug 21, 2004
    #14
  15. Nick

    Divine Guest

    On Sat, 21 Aug 2004 17:32:15 +1200, ~misfit~ wrote:

    >> You could use one of the Pentiums as a firewall/router for your home
    >> network if you haven't already got one running. They are very good for
    >> things like that. From experience I'd recommend using a separate dual
    >> speed hub tho', if you want the network to function at the faster of
    >> the two speeds.

    >
    > I tried that once using E-Smith but it didn't like me. I gave up on it
    > after a few days.


    I can well recomend using Smoothwall - it's been simply superb! I update
    it from time to time when they release updates for it. I've been using it
    since about version 0.8.x or 0.9.x . It is presently based on the Linux
    2.4.x kernel. A friend gave me a copy of it burned to disc back when I
    really had no clue at all about *any* networking stuff or about any OS
    other than Windows98. It has worked faultlessly.


    Now if anyone can post a link to a downloadable manual for the 3Com
    SuperStack 2 PS Hub 40 12 port, especially detailing how to programme it
    I'd be most appreciative. :eek:)


    Divine

    --
    "A life? Sounds great! Do you know where I could download one?"
    Divine, Aug 21, 2004
    #15
  16. Nick

    Divine Guest

    On Sat, 21 Aug 2004 17:53:39 +1200, cowboyz wrote:

    > So you were the bugger. I heard about the $388 LCD monitors and went in but
    > they had just sold the last one. Bugger. I am *still* on CRTs!


    Nothing wrong with CRTs. Certainly if you are doing any kind of graphic
    design work you pretty much need to use CRTs if you want to see the
    colours accurately.


    Divine

    --
    43 - for those who require slightly more than the answer to life, the universe
    and everything.
    Divine, Aug 21, 2004
    #16
  17. Nick

    cowboyz Guest

    Divine wrote:
    > On Sat, 21 Aug 2004 17:53:39 +1200, cowboyz wrote:
    >
    >> So you were the bugger. I heard about the $388 LCD monitors and
    >> went in but they had just sold the last one. Bugger. I am
    >> *still* on CRTs!

    >
    > Nothing wrong with CRTs. Certainly if you are doing any kind of
    > graphic design work you pretty much need to use CRTs if you want to
    > see the colours accurately.
    >
    >
    > Divine


    Not my ones. One is a Philips 107S and we all know what the S stands for.
    It is really dark and a pain in the arse to play games on so it is my
    secondary. My Primary is a ViewSonic 17EA which is not too bad.
    cowboyz, Aug 21, 2004
    #17
  18. Nick

    Divine Guest

    On Sat, 21 Aug 2004 20:20:58 +1200, cowboyz wrote:

    >> Nothing wrong with CRTs. Certainly if you are doing any kind of
    >> graphic design work you pretty much need to use CRTs if you want to
    >> see the colours accurately.
    >>
    >>
    >> Divine

    >
    > Not my ones. One is a Philips 107S and we all know what the S stands for.
    > It is really dark and a pain in the arse to play games on so it is my
    > secondary. My Primary is a ViewSonic 17EA which is not too bad.


    "S" is for "shite" made by Philips.

    I have a Philips 109p. It has a trinitron tube and is very nice indeed!


    Divine

    --
    43 - for those who require slightly more than the answer to life, the universe
    and everything.
    Divine, Aug 21, 2004
    #18
  19. Divine wrote:
    > Nothing wrong with CRTs. Certainly if you are doing any kind of graphic
    > design work you pretty much need to use CRTs if you want to see the
    > colours accurately.


    is this the case even when using digital input?

    just wondered as I thought that this was the reason for using the
    digital input on LCDs.
    Dave - Dave.net.nz, Aug 21, 2004
    #19
  20. Nick

    Divine Guest

    On Sat, 21 Aug 2004 23:00:03 +1200, Dave - Dave.net.nz wrote:

    >> Nothing wrong with CRTs. Certainly if you are doing any kind of graphic
    >> design work you pretty much need to use CRTs if you want to see the
    >> colours accurately.

    >
    > is this the case even when using digital input?
    >
    > just wondered as I thought that this was the reason for using the
    > digital input on LCDs.


    Yes.

    IIRC, the digital input consists of the analogue signals plus a few other
    things to control the monitor.

    Fonts do not display well on a LCD screen - they require special
    processing.

    Standard LCD screens are also incapable of high resolutions such as
    1600*1200, which are most useful when doing graphic stuff as they give you
    more screen real estate.

    And the colour and brightness of LCD displays is uneven due to the change
    of viewing angle.


    Divine

    --
    "What some people have against Open Source Software is what Fundamentalist
    Christians or Moslems have against Knowledge."
    Divine, Aug 21, 2004
    #20
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