This Is Strange, Hmmm

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by =?Utf-8?B?QWxpYXM=?=, Aug 18, 2006.

  1. Hello to all,


    I have two computers in a wireless setup.

    machine #1 is the host with router
    machine #2 has an adapter sharing internet connection.

    I cannot access the "Program Files" or the "Windows" folders on machine #2
    from machine #1 and vice versa.

    Now here's the strange part: If I create an account on machine #2 with the
    same name as my account on machine #1 then I am able to access those folders.

    So, does anyone in cyberworld know why this is? Can someone school me on
    this!

    -A
     
    =?Utf-8?B?QWxpYXM=?=, Aug 18, 2006
    #1
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  2. =?Utf-8?B?QWxpYXM=?=

    Frankster Guest

    When you "access" a drive on the other computer, your *current* logon
    credentials are passed, in the background. You *must* have the same
    userID/password combo on both machines in order to pass the authentication
    (assuming the permissions are set up that way).

    It is customary to set up each users username/password on each and every
    computer on a workgroup to share files and printers and such.

    -Frank

    "Alias" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hello to all,
    >
    >
    > I have two computers in a wireless setup.
    >
    > machine #1 is the host with router
    > machine #2 has an adapter sharing internet connection.
    >
    > I cannot access the "Program Files" or the "Windows" folders on machine #2
    > from machine #1 and vice versa.
    >
    > Now here's the strange part: If I create an account on machine #2 with
    > the
    > same name as my account on machine #1 then I am able to access those
    > folders.
    >
    > So, does anyone in cyberworld know why this is? Can someone school me on
    > this!
    >
    > -A
     
    Frankster, Aug 18, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Frankster,

    Well that sucks. Is there a way to get around this authentication stuff and
    still be able to access both Program Files and Windows folders on local
    machines?

    -A

    "Frankster" wrote:

    > When you "access" a drive on the other computer, your *current* logon
    > credentials are passed, in the background. You *must* have the same
    > userID/password combo on both machines in order to pass the authentication
    > (assuming the permissions are set up that way).
    >
    > It is customary to set up each users username/password on each and every
    > computer on a workgroup to share files and printers and such.
    >
    > -Frank
    >
    > "Alias" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Hello to all,
    > >
    > >
    > > I have two computers in a wireless setup.
    > >
    > > machine #1 is the host with router
    > > machine #2 has an adapter sharing internet connection.
    > >
    > > I cannot access the "Program Files" or the "Windows" folders on machine #2
    > > from machine #1 and vice versa.
    > >
    > > Now here's the strange part: If I create an account on machine #2 with
    > > the
    > > same name as my account on machine #1 then I am able to access those
    > > folders.
    > >
    > > So, does anyone in cyberworld know why this is? Can someone school me on
    > > this!
    > >
    > > -A

    >
    >
    >
     
    =?Utf-8?B?QWxpYXM=?=, Aug 18, 2006
    #3
  4. =?Utf-8?B?QWxpYXM=?=

    Malke Guest

    Alias wrote:

    > Frankster,
    >
    > Well that sucks. Is there a way to get around this authentication stuff
    > and still be able to access both Program Files and Windows folders on
    > local machines?


    > "Frankster" wrote:
    >
    >> When you "access" a drive on the other computer, your *current* logon
    >> credentials are passed, in the background. You *must* have the same
    >> userID/password combo on both machines in order to pass the
    >> authentication (assuming the permissions are set up that way).
    >>
    >> It is customary to set up each users username/password on each and every
    >> computer on a workgroup to share files and printers and such.


    >> > I have two computers in a wireless setup.
    >> >
    >> > machine #1 is the host with router
    >> > machine #2 has an adapter sharing internet connection.
    >> >
    >> > I cannot access the "Program Files" or the "Windows" folders on machine
    >> > #2 from machine #1 and vice versa.
    >> >
    >> > Now here's the strange part: If I create an account on machine #2 with
    >> > the
    >> > same name as my account on machine #1 then I am able to access those
    >> > folders.


    There's nothing strange about this. It is the way computer networking works
    with operating systems like XP, *nix, Win2k which are designed to be
    multi-user and scalable (not Win9x/ME). There has to be some way for the
    target computer to authenticate the request for resources. In a domain, the
    authentication is kept on the server. In a peer-to-peer network (Workgroups
    in the Windows world) the computer getting the request looks locally at who
    (username/password) is permitted to access its shared resources. If you are
    on the list, you get in.

    You didn't say what operating systems you are running, but if XP:

    If one or more of the computers is XP Pro:

    a. If you need Pro's ability to set fine-grained permissions, turn off
    Simple File Sharing (Folder Options>View tab) and create identical user
    accounts/passwords on all computers.

    b. If you don't care about using Pro's advanced features, leave the Simple
    File Sharing enabled.

    Simple File Sharing means that Guest (network) is enabled. This means that
    anyone without a user account on the target system can use its resources.
    This is a security hole but only you can decide if it matters in your
    situation.

    Then create shares as desired. XP Home does not permit sharing of users'
    home directories (My Documents) or Program Files, but you can share folders
    inside those directories. A better choice is to simply use the Shared
    Documents folder.

    There is usually no reason to share the Program Files directory because you
    can't normally run a program from a remote machine anyway. There is *never*
    any reason to share the Windows directory over the network and that would
    be very bad practice, even in a home user situation.

    If you want to understand more about the mechanics of network sharing,
    there's lots of information on the web about it. Here are some links to get
    you started:

    http://www.practicallynetworked.com/
    http://www.practicallynetworked.com/sharing/xp/network_protocols.htm
    http://www.practicallynetworked.com/sharing/xp/filesharing.htm (Home)
    http://www.practicallynetworked.com/sharing/xp_filesharing/index.htm (Pro)

    http://www.bcmaven.com/networking/faq.htm
    http://www.bcmaven.com/networking/myths.htm

    http://nitecruzr.blogspot.com/

    Malke
    --
    MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
    Elephant Boy Computers
    www.elephantboycomputers.com
    "Don't Panic"
     
    Malke, Aug 18, 2006
    #4
  5. Malke and Frankster,

    Thanks for the info and links. I have a better understanding about networks
    now, but wish I had more control over how authentication works. I still have
    questions but I'll start a new thread for that.

    Thanks again you two :)

    -A

    "Malke" wrote:

    > Alias wrote:
    >
    > > Frankster,
    > >
    > > Well that sucks. Is there a way to get around this authentication stuff
    > > and still be able to access both Program Files and Windows folders on
    > > local machines?

    >
    > > "Frankster" wrote:
    > >
    > >> When you "access" a drive on the other computer, your *current* logon
    > >> credentials are passed, in the background. You *must* have the same
    > >> userID/password combo on both machines in order to pass the
    > >> authentication (assuming the permissions are set up that way).
    > >>
    > >> It is customary to set up each users username/password on each and every
    > >> computer on a workgroup to share files and printers and such.

    >
    > >> > I have two computers in a wireless setup.
    > >> >
    > >> > machine #1 is the host with router
    > >> > machine #2 has an adapter sharing internet connection.
    > >> >
    > >> > I cannot access the "Program Files" or the "Windows" folders on machine
    > >> > #2 from machine #1 and vice versa.
    > >> >
    > >> > Now here's the strange part: If I create an account on machine #2 with
    > >> > the
    > >> > same name as my account on machine #1 then I am able to access those
    > >> > folders.

    >
    > There's nothing strange about this. It is the way computer networking works
    > with operating systems like XP, *nix, Win2k which are designed to be
    > multi-user and scalable (not Win9x/ME). There has to be some way for the
    > target computer to authenticate the request for resources. In a domain, the
    > authentication is kept on the server. In a peer-to-peer network (Workgroups
    > in the Windows world) the computer getting the request looks locally at who
    > (username/password) is permitted to access its shared resources. If you are
    > on the list, you get in.
    >
    > You didn't say what operating systems you are running, but if XP:
    >
    > If one or more of the computers is XP Pro:
    >
    > a. If you need Pro's ability to set fine-grained permissions, turn off
    > Simple File Sharing (Folder Options>View tab) and create identical user
    > accounts/passwords on all computers.
    >
    > b. If you don't care about using Pro's advanced features, leave the Simple
    > File Sharing enabled.
    >
    > Simple File Sharing means that Guest (network) is enabled. This means that
    > anyone without a user account on the target system can use its resources.
    > This is a security hole but only you can decide if it matters in your
    > situation.
    >
    > Then create shares as desired. XP Home does not permit sharing of users'
    > home directories (My Documents) or Program Files, but you can share folders
    > inside those directories. A better choice is to simply use the Shared
    > Documents folder.
    >
    > There is usually no reason to share the Program Files directory because you
    > can't normally run a program from a remote machine anyway. There is *never*
    > any reason to share the Windows directory over the network and that would
    > be very bad practice, even in a home user situation.
    >
    > If you want to understand more about the mechanics of network sharing,
    > there's lots of information on the web about it. Here are some links to get
    > you started:
    >
    > http://www.practicallynetworked.com/
    > http://www.practicallynetworked.com/sharing/xp/network_protocols.htm
    > http://www.practicallynetworked.com/sharing/xp/filesharing.htm (Home)
    > http://www.practicallynetworked.com/sharing/xp_filesharing/index.htm (Pro)
    >
    > http://www.bcmaven.com/networking/faq.htm
    > http://www.bcmaven.com/networking/myths.htm
    >
    > http://nitecruzr.blogspot.com/
    >
    > Malke
    > --
    > MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
    > Elephant Boy Computers
    > www.elephantboycomputers.com
    > "Don't Panic"
    >
     
    =?Utf-8?B?QWxpYXM=?=, Aug 18, 2006
    #5
  6. Malke and Frankster,

    Thanks for the info and links. I have a better understanding about networks
    now, but wish I had more control over how authentication works. I still have
    questions but I'll start a new thread for that.

    Thanks again you two :)

    -A


    "Alias" wrote:

    > Hello to all,
    >
    >
    > I have two computers in a wireless setup.
    >
    > machine #1 is the host with router
    > machine #2 has an adapter sharing internet connection.
    >
    > I cannot access the "Program Files" or the "Windows" folders on machine #2
    > from machine #1 and vice versa.
    >
    > Now here's the strange part: If I create an account on machine #2 with the
    > same name as my account on machine #1 then I am able to access those folders.
    >
    > So, does anyone in cyberworld know why this is? Can someone school me on
    > this!
    >
    > -A
     
    =?Utf-8?B?QWxpYXM=?=, Aug 18, 2006
    #6
  7. Malke and Frankster,

    Thanks for the info and links. I have a better understanding about networks
    now, but wish I had more control over how authentication works. I still have
    questions but I'll start a new thread for that.

    Thanks again you two :)

    -A


    "Alias" wrote:

    > Hello to all,
    >
    >
    > I have two computers in a wireless setup.
    >
    > machine #1 is the host with router
    > machine #2 has an adapter sharing internet connection.
    >
    > I cannot access the "Program Files" or the "Windows" folders on machine #2
    > from machine #1 and vice versa.
    >
    > Now here's the strange part: If I create an account on machine #2 with the
    > same name as my account on machine #1 then I am able to access those folders.
    >
    > So, does anyone in cyberworld know why this is? Can someone school me on
    > this!
    >
    > -A
     
    =?Utf-8?B?QWxpYXM=?=, Aug 18, 2006
    #7
  8. "Alias" wrote:

    > Hello to all,
    >
    >
    > I have two computers in a wireless setup.
    >
    > machine #1 is the host with router
    > machine #2 has an adapter sharing internet connection.
    >
    > I cannot access the "Program Files" or the "Windows" folders on machine #2
    > from machine #1 and vice versa.
    >
    > Now here's the strange part: If I create an account on machine #2 with the
    > same name as my account on machine #1 then I am able to access those folders.
    >
    > So, does anyone in cyberworld know why this is? Can someone school me on
    > this!
    >
    > One way around is to run the network wizard on both machines. Make sure the administrator passwords match as well. Also use the run command and type gpedit.msc to check network permissons. look at the allow category, if nothing is in it, add everyone. Then check the deny category, leave this empty.
     
    =?Utf-8?B?QklPIE1lZA==?=, Aug 19, 2006
    #8
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