this could be a problem

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by thingy, May 22, 2006.

  1. thingy

    thingy Guest

    "Since then, a Supreme Court ruling and a series of Federal
    Communications Commission (FCC) decisions have eliminated this barrier,
    prompting Congress to rewrite the nation's telecommunications laws. The
    new bill, which could be finalized as early as the summer, will in all
    likelihood officially eliminate net neutrality as the legal principle
    that governs the Internet. "If net neutrality goes away, it will
    fundamentally change everything about the Internet," says James Hilton,
    associate provost for Academic IT Works of the University of Michigan."

    http://www.cio.com/archive/041506/net.html

    So a somone's 1 & 0 is worth more than someone elses 1 & 0.....but only
    if you are a greedy corporate bent on screwing customers
    over.....Interesting that do do this sort of thing requires expensive
    and complex kit which will be slower to do what it is meant to do, route
    packets.....but of course they doe not stand in the way ofmCisco aiming
    to make lots of $

    regards

    Thing
     
    thingy, May 22, 2006
    #1
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  2. On Mon, 22 May 2006 16:40:26 +1200, someone purporting to be thingy didst
    scrawl:

    *SNIP*
    > So a somone's 1 & 0 is worth more than someone elses 1 & 0.....but only
    > if you are a greedy corporate bent on screwing customers over.....


    Greedy telco. MS (yes, really), Google, Amazon, Yahoo and a bunch of
    others made REALLY loud noises against this. Unfortunately they weren't
    louder than the loud noises made by the telco lobby.
    I can see there being a massive market for a couple of T1 carriers that
    won't engage in this behaviour, but sadly I can't think of two that are
    independent of the telco's. Talk about a game theorist's nightmare.

    > Interesting that do do this sort of thing requires expensive and complex
    > kit which will be slower to do what it is meant to do, route
    > packets.....but of course they doe not stand in the way ofmCisco aiming
    > to make lots of $
    >

    Not Cisco's fault. There are legitimate uses for packet-prioritisation
    hardware, particularly as telco's replace their PSTN backbones with VoIP.
    This is just another QoS metric, and QoS isn't new or evil - just like
    most other technology, it is what it is and it's the end use that is
    virtuous or villainous.

    --
    Matthew Poole
    "Don't use force. Get a bigger hammer."
     
    Matthew Poole, May 22, 2006
    #2
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